Fall 2012 Undergraduate Course Listings

Fall 2012 Undergraduate Course Listings

Fall 2012 Undergraduate Courses

 

English 2100: Film Interpretation (Honors College) English 3710: Structures of Modern English
English 2100: Film Interpretation English 3720: Development of Modern English
English 2110: Folklore and Mythology English 3830: Literature for the Intermediate Reader
English 2220: Literatures and Cultures of the United States English 3840: Adolescent Literature
English 2220: Literatures and Cultures of the United States - Slavery and Segregation English 3840: Adolescent Literature
English 2230: African-American Literature English 4060: Topics in Textual Production - Proposals and Pitches: Grant Writing for Professionals
English 2230: African-American Literature English 4080: Special Topics in Rhetoric and Writing Studies - Parody and Rhetoric
English 2520: Shakespeare English 4150: Literary Theory and Criticism
English 3050: Introduction to Professional Writing English 4400: Studies in Verse
English 3050: Introduction to Professional Writing English 4420: Studies in Drama
English 3060: Rhetoric, Writing, and Culture English 4440: Studies in the Novel
English 3080: Quest for Self English 4440: Studies in the Novel
English 3120: Western World Literature English 4520: Shakespeare Seminar
English 3130: Asian Literature English 4720: Language Variation in American English
English 3140: African Literature English 4720: Language Variation in American English
English 3200: American Literature I English 4790: Writing in the Secondary School
English 3200: American Literature I English 4800: Teaching Literature in Secondary Schools
English 3210: American Literature II English 5300: Medieval Literature
English 3300: British Literature I English 5360: Romantic Literature
English 3310: British Literature II English 5660: Creative Writing Workshop, Fiction
English 3310: British Literature II English 5660: Creative Writing Workshop, Fiction
English 3660: Advanced Fiction Writing English 5670: Creative Writing Workshop, Poetry
English 3680: Playwriting English 5680: Creative Writing Workshop, Playwriting
English 3690: Writing in the Elementary School English 5970: Studies in English, Variable Topics - Slavery and the American Literary Imagination

 

 

English 2100: Film Interpretation (Honors College)

Mondays and Wednesdays, 2:00 - 4:50; Brown 1028
Dr. Nicolas Witschi

You say, "it's just a movie"? Film is a complex art form designed to communicate, enlighten, and entertain. Whether we‘re talking about Citizen Kane or Dude, Where's My Car, all films require their viewers to be intensely active in piecing together a complex set of associations, narrative devices, and ideas. By looking at the closely related matters of art (style, theme, meaning) and craft (lighting, cinematography, editing, design, sound), this class offers an account of how meaning arises in the interaction between viewers and the medium. Also, with both historically classic films and popular genre movies on our screening schedule, we'll explore a number of themes and issues crucial to the representation (even creation) of America‘s cultural and ideological identity. Understanding what we as viewers do every time we watch a film allows us to enjoy, learn from, and appreciate them to an ever greater degree. This, then, is a class in how to watch and listen to films. Please note: several of the films in this class contain intense, mature, and possibly controversial subject matter and representations. I expect us to approach each and every screening and discussion in a manner consistent with and well-suited to academic inquiry. This course satisfies one (1) General Education requirement in: Area I – Fine Arts.



English 2100: Film Interpretation

Tuesdays and Thursdays, 2:00 - 2:50; Knaus 3512
Tuesdays and Thursdays, 10:00 – 12:20; Brown 1028
Mondays and Wednesdays, 10:00 – 12:20; Brown 2028
Dr. Casey McKittrick

Film Interpretation is a course designed to acclimate students to thinking critically about the medium of cinema. In watching films of various genres, time periods, and nationalities, and learning critical vocabularies for assessing the cinematic experience, students will learn to discuss how narrative, sound, mise-en-scene, cinematography, and editing work together to produce meaning for the film spectator. Students will confront aesthetic, social, and ideological questions surrounding the production and reception of movies. Films may include, but are not limited to: Citizen Kane, Election, Women on the Verge of a Nervous Breakdown, Boogie Nights, Grand Illusion, Nosferatu, The Hours, Mildred Pierce, Rear Window, Vertigo, Higher Learning, and Rebel Without a Cause.



English 2110: Folklore and Mythology

Tuesdays and Thursdays, 10:00 - 11:50; Brown 3048
Dr. Mustafa Mirzeler

In this course students will explore the folklore and mythology of people who live in disparate parts of the world. In the world, past and present, what assuage the pain and suffering of people are the stories, the myths, and the imaginary worlds of the ancient storytellers. In reading the accounts of these storytellers, the students will enter into their magical worlds and experience the magical truth of storytelling as well as the magic of the words. In every age, human societies have produced their master storytellers who have moved tradition into new dispensations through the magic of words. They have exerted their influence on the present, giving it a mythic image in a traditional context. The genius of these ancient storytellers can be traced in the traditional genres of the popular ballad and in the art forms of contemporary master storytellers and poets. In the work of these storytellers new myths arise from and intertwine with the old to create unique and inventive new worlds. Drawing from the contemporary folklore and mythology, this course historicizes and conceptualizes cultural and social contexts that produce folklore and myths around the world.



English 2220: Literatures and Cultures of the United States

Mondays and Wednesdays, 2:00 - 3:50; Brown 3017
Dr. Katherine Joslin

This course looks closely at the idea of a national literature, specifically a literature of the United States, and reflects on the relationship between literature and the culture that creates it. As we read essays, stories, novels, and nonfiction narratives this semester, we will think about how the United States produces a variety of literatures, distinctive from each other in significant ways, and consider the nature of our collective identity as a country. We will spend class time in conversation and writing. You will need to keep up with the reading and participate actively in discussions. The class will select one of the books we will read this semester and work in groups to plan presentations that focus on writers not on the syllabus. In addition to writing assignments, you will take a midterm and a final exam.

Texts will include Sherman Alexie, Reservation Blues; Bonnie Jo Campbell , American Salvage; Maxine Hong Kingston, The Woman Warrior: Memoirs of a Girlhood Among Ghosts; Barak Obama, Dreams from My Father: A Story of Race and Inheritance; and Richard Rodriguez, Brown: The Last Discovery of America.



English 2220: Literatures and Cultures of the United States - Slavery and Segregation

Tuesdays and Thursdays, 12:00 - 1:50; Brown 3048
Dr. Scott Slawinski

This section of English 2220 will spend the semester looking at images of African-American chattel slavery and the plight of the freed slaves in the aftermath of the American Civil War. We will read autobiographies written by slaves, novelistic efforts to attack and defend the South’s “peculiar institution,” stories that look back nostalgically or realistically at the antebellum era, and ultimately narratives critical or supportive of Jim Crow segregation. Chronologically, for the most part will shall remain in the nineteenth century, reading those authors who had first hand experience with slavery and segregation. Both African-American and European-American authors will be on the syllabus. Likely texts include autobiographies by Frederick Douglass and Harriet Jacobs, novels by Harriet Beecher Stowe and Carline Lee Hentz, and short stories by Charles Chesnutt. Students can expect to write at least two essays, take frequent reading quizzes, and complete a final exam.



English 2230: African-American Literature

Tuesdays and Thursdays, 2:00 - 3:50; Brown 3017
Dr. John Saillant

This course surveys African-American literature from the era of the slave trade to the present. Written work includes three essays.



English 2230: African-American Literature

Mondays and Wednesdays, 4:00 - 5:50; Brown 1048
Dr. Casey McKittrick

This section of African American Literature examines predominantly 20th century African-American literary and cultural production. Students will become conversant with some of the social, political, and aesthetic questions bound up in Black authorship and readership. The focus for this course is on the novel, with a foray into essays and short stories. Authors may include, but are not limited to, W. E. B. DuBois, Booker T. Washington, Zora Neale Hurston, Ann Petry, Richard Wright, James Baldwin, Toni Morrison, and Ntozake Shange.



English 2520: Shakespeare

Tuesdays and Thursdays, 10:00 - 11:50; Brown 4017
Dr. Anthony Ellis

Catalog Description: A survey of Shakespeare’s art through study of selected tragedies, histories, and comedies.



English 3050: Introduction to Professional Writing

Mondays and Wednesdays, 12:00 - 1:50; Brown 1045
Dr. Charlotte Thralls

English 3050 is a course designed to develop your confidence and competency in written communication. Whatever your future career plans or your current, favorite media for communicating (print, digital, twitter, Facebook or other social media), you are likely to need strong writing skills. Numerous studies, for example, show that in many professions, communication skills are ranked at the top (first or second place) of the most valued qualities for success. Many of you might be surprised at how central writing is in the day-to-day life of most professionals. To help prepare you for the challenges ahead, this class will expand your writing repertoires beyond the academic essay or research paper. Through various class projects, you will

  • Become familiar with the formats and rhetorical challenges of various practical genres and document formats (memos, reports, manuals, web text, visual displays and designs, etc.)

  • Develop skill for anticipating (and addressing) the needs and reactions of audiences to communications in different contexts

  • Learn the fundamentals of reader-centered communication, including the fundamentals of document design and readability used to create well-crafted documents

  • Learn about some documents and communication habits typical for professionals in your discipline

The course is held in a computer lab with plenty of opportunity for personalized help with course projects.



English 3050: Introduction to Professional Writing

Tuesdays and Thursdays, 2:00 - 3:50; Brown 1045
Dr. Thomas Kent

This course will cover the rhetorical strategy of reader-centered writing, and students will have the opportunity to compose several kinds of documents regularly employed in work-place settings.



English 3060: Rhetoric, Writing, and Culture

Mondays and Wednesdays, 3:30 - 4:45; Brown 1045
Dr. Charlotte Thralls

It is not uncommon to hear rhetoric used as a derogatory term, as if rhetoric is synonymous with deceitful and flashy language, standing in stark opposition to nonrhetoric, which is clear and honest. While rhetoric can certainly be used to manipulate, the term encompasses a much broader meaning and a rich history going back to the ancient Greeks and Romans. Simply put, rhetoric is the study of the various signs and symbols that make human communication possible.

A central focus of the course will be how rhetoric functions in contemporary cultural life, giving significance, meaning, and value to day-to-day practices in consumer, corporate, organizational, and popular culture. The overarching course goal is to help you gain knowledge about human communication and how it works, so that you have greater insight into your own communication practices and can better assess the effects and consequences of the communications around you.

Through class readings and course projects, you’ll have the opportunity to study rhetoric in written, oral, and visual forms representing a range of genres and media. Possibilities include literature, business and professional documents, advertising, television, film and video, music, blogs, websites, social media, and more. We will study some of these rhetorical forms together, but for major course papers, you’ll have the chance to choose rhetorical forms of particular interest to you.

Students can expect to

  • read a range of articles and essays that define rhetoric and rhetorical concepts, explain rhetorical theories, and model effective rhetorical analyses

  • conduct research about rhetorical artifacts

  • synthesize and evaluate your research in writing: two short (3-4 pages) papers and one longer (10-12 pages) paper.



English 3080: Quest for Self

Tuesdays and Thursdays, 9:30 - 10:45; Brown 4010
Dr. Philip Egan

This section of Quest for Self will examine principally two kinds of works.  Early in the semester we will read a number of “initiation” stories and some short plays, which treat young people who are either confronting a new situation or are passing from one developmental stage to another.  In the middle and later portions of the course, we will consider a number of longer works focused primarily mostly upon adolescents and young adults.  We will also study some theories of psychological development to see how they enrich (or even dispute) development as it is portrayed in the literature. 



English 3120: Western World Literature

Wednesdays, 4:00 - 6:20; Moore 1121
TBA

Catalog Description: Study of works selected from the Western literary tradition, excluding those from Great Britain and the U.S.A. Selections may range from biblical literature and great works of Greece and Rome through classics of the Middle Ages and Renaissance to major works of the present. Works will be studied in English.



English 3130: Asian Literature

Tuesdays and Thursdays, 12:30 - 1:45; Brown 1028
Dr. Mustafa Mirzeler

This course introduces students to the richness and variety of literary traditions in various regions of Asia: Ancient Mesopotamia, Arabia, Turkey, Kurdistan, Azerbaijan, Afghanistan, and Palestine. Asian storytellers have always been imaginative and innovative; relying on oral tradition and the written word they have worked and continue to work within the realms of fantasy and reality. The fantasy element of their oral tradition and written literature is the link to a fabulous and grandly mythicized past created in epic tales, stories, and novels. The genius of Asian storytellers can be found in their ability to work within the traditional genres of the popular ballad and the ancient epic. You will find traces of the epic narrative form in the modern masters Yashar Kemal, Said Kurban, or Khaled Hosseini. In the work of Asian storytellers new myths arise from and intertwine with the old to create unique and inventive new worlds.



English 3140: African Literature

Thursdays, 4:00 - 6:20; Brown 3045
Dr. Allen Webb

Today there are 1 billion people living in Africa, speaking perhaps 2000 languages. The continent comprises 20% of the land of the planet, is enormously rich in resources, yet much of Africa is desperately poor with vast populations attempting to live on less than $2 per day.

This course seeks to use African literature, memoir, film, biography, autobiography, history, library and on-line sources to begin to understand the enormous complexity of Africa and the challenges facing the continent. A cornerstone of this course is the idea that knowledge creates responsibility. Students will be expected to address what they are learning by research, collaboration, and action.

We begin our study of the current crisis in Africa by looking at the colonial and early national period. Turning to literature from the present we will encounter issues such as economic and political corruption and collapse, resource exploitation, poverty, education, the condition of women, the environment, warfare and child soldiers, AIDS, immigration, etc.

As we learn about challenges in Africa we will also explore solutions. Africa is young; in some countries half of the population is under 25. Most of our reading will be about young people, many college age, their life experience and how they are making a positive difference. After extensive reading and study as a class, students will form groups focused on specific issues to engage in additional reading, research, action, and work with African and international organizations dedicated to a brighter future for the continent.

For further information consult allenwebb.net.



English 3200: American Literature I

Mondays, 4:00 - 6:20; Brown 3017
Dr. Daneen Wardrop

In English 3200, we will encounter a variety of American literatures of different genres. Our readings will include works such as the Native American tale, Puritan poem, slave narrative, gothic tale, Transcendentalist essay, frontier humor, nurse narrative, and many others. Some of the authors whose works we investigate will be the following: Anne Bradstreet, Mary Rowlandson, Benjamin Franklin, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Edgar Allan Poe, Margaret Fuller, Frederick Douglass, Herman Melville, Harriet Jacobs, and Emily Dickinson. Our objective will be to read American literature from beginnings up to the Civil War, aiming for both coverage and acute comprehension. Because the course is a survey course our readings will be fast and furious but not, it is to be hoped, without depth. Requirements include class participation, group presentation, responsible reading, writing, mid-term and final examinations.



English 3200: American Literature I

Tuesdays and Thursdays, 11:00 - 12:15; Brown 4010
Dr. John Saillant

Survey of American literature from the planting of the colonies to the Civil War. Writings studied include poetry, autobiography, sermons, fiction, essays, and political documents. Student assignments include three essays.



English 3210: American Literature II

Tuesdays and Thursdays, 11:00 - 12:15; Brown 4003
Tuesdays and Thursdays, 3:30 – 4:45; Brown 3010
Dr. Jon Adams

Description: Exploring authors beginning with late 19th-Century realists through contemporary writers, this course will introduce students to American Literature since 1865 and help them identify, interpret, and/or understand the divergent styles of those responsible for shaping literary arts in 20th-Century America.

Graded assignments include: two essays, 5 reading responses, a comprehensive final, an individual lead for discussion, and in-class exercises on material read for the day.

Required Texts:
Anderson, Sherwood. Winesburg, Ohio. Dover, 0486282694
Auster, Paul. Oracle Night. Picador, 0312423667
Erdrich, Louise. Tracks. Harper, 0060972459
Hemingway, Ernest. In Our Time. Scribners, 0684822768
Jewett, Sarah Orne. The Country of Pointed Firs. Dover, 0486281965
Larsen, Nella. Passing. Dover, 0486437132
Morrison, Toni. Jazz. Vintage, 1400076218
O‘Connor, Flannery. Wise Blood. Farrar, Strauss, 0374505845
Okada, John. No-No Boy. U Wash. Press, 0295955252
Toomer, Jean. Cane. Norton, 0393956008



English 3300: British Literature I

Mondays and Wednesdays, 2:00 - 3:15; Welborn 1122
Dr. Grace Tiffany

This class broadly surveys the first eight hundred years of English literature, starting with Anglo-Saxon poetry in translation (c. 900), continuing through the Middle English poetry of Chaucer (late 14th century), then moving through the ages of Shakespeare and Milton during the English Renaissance (1580-1660), and ending with the 18th-century authors Jonathan Swift and Alexander Pope. The class is designed to promote understanding of major historical trends as they pertained to the greatest and most influential works of literature in the English language.

Prerequisite: English 1100 (Literary Interpretation).

Text: The Norton Anthology of English Literature Vols. 1a and 2a, 8thed.
Assignments: two papers (25% ea.), daily quizzes (25%), final exam (25%).



English 3310: British Literature II

Tuesdays and Thursdays, 11:00 - 12:15; Brown 4002
Dr. Christopher MacLean-Nagle

This course provides an intensive introductory survey of British literature from the past two centuries. This era can be divided into three distinct periods: Romantic, Victorian, and Modern. Writers of the Romantic period (roughly 1780 to 1830) were inspired by dramatic social change in the American and French revolutions and initially sought to revolutionize literature by adopting what poet William Wordsworth called the "language really used by men."

The Victorian era, named for the Queen who ruled Britain from 1837 to 1901, was also revolutionary, even though it has become associated with tradition and repression. Advances in science, industry, and trade made Victorian Britain the most powerful nation on earth, but writers and artists also lamented its staggering poverty, gender inequality, declining morals, and increasing sense of uncertainty. This uncertainty came to a head in the twentieth century with a host of changes—the rise of cities, shifts in gender dynamics, the psychological devastation of world war, and the steady decline of Britain‘s empire. Major writers from each of these eras will be covered and the contexts of their writing explored, so that students emerge from this course with a strong sense of the most important literary and cultural influences in the British tradition during these centuries.



English 3310: British Literature II

Mondays and Wednesdays, 2:00 - 3:15; Brown 2048
TBA

TBA.



English 3660: Advanced Fiction Writing

Mondays, 6:30 - 9:00; Brown 2045
Dr. Richard Katrovas

Catalog Description: An advanced course in the writing of fiction, with emphasis on class discussion and criticism of each student’s writing.



English 3680: Playwriting

Mondays and Wednesdays, 2:00 - 3:15; Brown 4045
Dr. Steve Feffer

Catalog Description: An introductory course in the writing of drama, with class discussion and criticism of each student’s writing, and including study of selected examples of drama in print and in production.



English 3690: Writing in the Elementary School

Tuesdays and Thursdays, 12:00 – 1:50 and 2:00 - 3:50; Brown 3037
Wednesdays, 6:30 – 9:50; Brown 3045
Dr. Toby Kahn-Loftus

Focuses on writing development of pre-school through middle school children, and on ways one can encourage and respond to student writing, assess writing growth, and use writing as a means of learning. Fosters a theoretical understanding of the writing process in part by writing in varied genres and forms. Emphasizes writing as an integral component of the entire curriculum and demonstrates the use of powerful mentor texts for teaching craft, grammar, and vocabulary.



English 3710: Structures of Modern English

Tuesdays and Thursdays, 2:00 - 3:50; Brown 3045
Dr. Paul Johnston

The course introduces students to the idea of English (and language in general) as a multi-leveled, patterned, structured system, a vehicle for speakers to produce utterances and to communicate in a social context. Participants learn the terms and concepts needed to study each level of this structure: phonetics/phonology (sounds), the morphology (meaningful word parts), lexical studies and semantics (words and meanings), syntax (sentences), and pragmatics (texts and whole utterances). Students will also study how writers of literature use these levels of language to create effects and patterns that guide readers toward certain interpretations of their texts.



English 3720: Development of Modern English

Mondays and Wednesdays, 12:00 - 1:50; Brown 3045
Dr. Lisa Minnick

From the catalog: English 3720 traces the development of modern English from its beginnings to the present, examining historic and linguistic influences on change in spoken and written English. It explores theories of language development, with emphasis on their practical implications.Learning objectives:

Students who complete the course successfully will acquire the following:

  • Language description skills, including proficiency in the International Phonetic Alphabet.

  • Working knowledge of terminology used in the discipline of linguistics.

  • Understanding of the external (social, political, intellectual) influences on language change.

  • Understanding of the internal (linguistic) mechanisms of language change.

  • Awareness of how standard varieties are authorized and institutionalized.

  • Understanding of English as a global lingua franca and the implications of its influence.



English 3830: Literature for the Intermediate Reader

Tuesdays, 5:00 – 8:30; Brown 3010
Mondays and Wednesdays, 2:00 - 3:50; Brown 3045
Mondays and Wednesdays, 10:00 – 11:50; Dunbar 4202
Dr. Judith Rypma

English 3830 focuses on criticism of works for children in grades 4 through 8, with a focus on critical thinking and close literary analysis. Works read include a variety of novels, epics, myths, poems, biographies, etc. This a lecture and discussion class, and serves as a content course for both education and non-education majors. It also fits Distribution Area 2.

Texts will include Spinelli's Eggs, Nikki Grimes' Bronx Masquerade, The Wonderful Wizard of Oz, The Devil's Arithmetic, I am Morgan le Fay, Bruchac's The Code Talker, The Kitchen Boy, Paolini's Eragon, and Tuck Everlasting. A variety of handouts of myths, hero tales, and poems will also be provided.




English 3840: Adolescent Literature

Tuesdays and Thursdays, 9:30 - 10:45; Brown 3010
Dr. Ilana Nash

Catalog Description: This course focuses on an analysis of literature for adolescents from a variety of critical and culturally diverse perspectives. It emphasizes the adolescent experience as reflected in literature, the history of adolescent literature and media, and the distinguishing features of classical and contemporary works.



English 3840: Adolescent Literature

Tuesdays and Thursdays, 2:00 - 3:15; Moore 1115
Dr. Gwen Tarbox

English 3840, Adolescent Literature, focuses on an analysis of literature for adolescents from a variety of critical and culturally diverse perspectives. It emphasizes the adolescent experience as reflected in literature, the history of adolescent literature and media, and the distinguishing features of classical and contemporary texts.

Students in ENGL 3840 will be part of a dynamic large lecture learning environment, where they will hear lectures, participate in problem-based learning exercises, and engage in class discussion (yes, even in a 70 person classroom, it is possible to have one's voice heard...and it will be impossible for a student to disappear into the woodwork). The majority of students’ grades will come from periodic quizzes and exams. Students can learn more about the course at: http://bookcandy.typepad.com/engl_3840_fall_2012/

Here is a copy of the text list. We will be reading a graphic novel, a verse novel, as well as a number of classic and contemporary texts:

Anderson, Feed; Blume, Forever; Green and Levithan, Will Grayson, Will Grayson; Hander and Kalman, Why We Broke Up; Powell, Swallow Me Whole; Rosoff, How I Live Now; Stork, Marcelo in the Real World; Wolff, Make Lemonade.

Students will need to purchase a $5.00 fee card for the course.



English 4060: Topics in Textual Production - Proposals and Pitches: Grant Writing for Professionals

Tuesdays and Thursdays, 12:30 - 1:45; Brown 1045
Dr. Brian Gogan

Convincing stakeholders to support you—to accept one of your ideas, to fund one of your projects, or to contribute to your organization—proves an invaluable skill in today’s workplace. Grant proposals and project pitches are two genres that shoulder much of this persuasive work and, in this course, you’ll study and produce both. In particular, you will:

  • Examine the motivation behind giving

  • Practice crafting conventional parts of a grant proposal and a project pitch

  • Identify funding opportunities and stakeholder needs by conducting research

  • Produce a complete grant proposal and project pitch for a community organization

In addition to reading and evaluating actual grant proposals and project pitches, you will also read selections from Aristotle, Andrew Carnegie, Phoebe Hearst, Bill Gates, Serge-Christophe Kolm, and a proposal writing textbook (to be determined). You’ll write a short analytical paper, compose formal evaluations of actual proposals and pitches, complete a case study, and work with a team to produce a grant and pitch for an actual organization.



English 4080: Special Topics in Rhetoric and Writing Studies - Parody and Rhetoric

Thursdays, 4:00 - 6:20; Brown 1045
Dr. Brian Gogan

Parody, for some, is one of the most effective rhetorical strategies that a writer, speaker, or artist can use. For others, parody and rhetoric are so closely connected that if you change one word in the definition of parody, you end up with the definition of rhetoric. Parody and rhetoric are, in other words, closely related and this course invites you to examine that relationship.

During the semester, you’ll read theories of parody and theories of rhetoric, including selections from Mikhail Bakhtin, Jean Baudrillard, Kenneth Burke, Cicero, Simon Dentith, Robert Hariman, Linda Hutcheon, Margaret Rose, John Ruszkiewicz, and Quintilian. You’ll also study a wide range of parodies (from the classical to the contemporary, from the stage to the web, from the book to the screen), some of which you will choose. Finally, you’ll write a few short position papers, lead a class discussion, and complete a semester-long research project that you will submit for publication.



English 4150: Literary Theory and Criticism

Tuesdays and Thursdays, 12:00 - 1:50; Brown 4025
Dr. Anthony Ellis

TBA.



English 4400: Studies in Verse

Mondays and Wednesdays, 2:00 - 3:50; Brown 4010
Dr. Elizabeth Bradburn

This course is an intensive study of poetry (narrative and lyric) with an emphasis on formalism. Regular attendance and completion of all reading assignments are expected. Students will take online reading quizzes before each class period. Class time will consist mainly of discussion. The class will decide on standards for discussion participation at the beginning of the semester, and participation will be graded accordingly. The main writing project will be a long (20 pp.) analytical paper. Students will work toward this project throughout the semester, with shorter writing exercises contributing to it. We will also prepare as a class for a September visit to Kalamazoo by the U.S. Poet Laureate Philip Levine. The primary texts will be:

Louise Glück, The Wild Iris
Philip Levine, What Work Is
George Herbert, The Temple
John Milton, Paradise Lost
Ronald Johnson, Radi Os
Derek Walcott, Omeros
Elizabeth Bishop, Geography III
John Ashbery, Selected Poems
Adrienne Rich, The Fact of a Doorframe
Anne Carson, The Autobiography of Red

Some critical and theoretical essays will also be assigned.



English 4420: Studies in Drama

Mondays and Wednesdays, 10:00 - 11:50; Kohrman 3303
TBA

Catalog Description: Studies in the major styles and forms of drama. Attention shall be paid to the critical and theoretical bases of interpretation.



English 4440: Studies in the Novel

Tuesdays and Thursdays, 2:00 - 3:50; Brown 3003
Dr. Jil Larson

Studies in the Novel is one of the university’s required baccalaureate writing courses. These courses give you the opportunity to write intensively within your major and, as such, ENGL 4440 is designed to help you hone the skills you have been developing all along in your English courses. It will also offer you in-depth study of a single genre, the novel, as well as subgenres within that larger category. We will read American, British, and international novels that employ a wide variety of narrative techniques and imagine fictional worlds of all sorts. Your writing will allow you to pursue your own particular interests in this literature and share your discoveries and insights with the rest of the class. Although the reading list is still in flux, it is likely to include 18th and early 19th century novels by Daniel Defoe, Mary Shelley, and/or Jane Austen, Victorian novels by Charlotte Bronte, Wilkie Collins, Charles Dickens, and/or Thomas Hardy, and 20th and 21st century novels by Virginia Woolf, Willa Cather, William Faulkner, Italo Calvino, Jhumpa Lahiri, Margaret Atwood, and/or Kazuo Ishiguro.



English 4440: Studies in the Novel

Wednesdays, 5:00 - 8:20; Brown 2037
Dr. Cynthia Klekar

Catalog Description: This course studies the development and diversity of the novel as a literary form. Emphasis will be on the novel from the eighteenth to the early twentieth century. Attention shall be paid to the critical and theoretical bases of interpretation. This course is approved as a writing-intensive course which may fulfill the baccalaureate-level writing requirement of students‘ curriculum.



English 4520: Shakespeare Seminar

Mondays and Wednesdays, 10:00 - 11:50; Dunbar 3210
Dr. Grace Tiffany

This is a discussion- and writing-intensive course which may fulfill the baccalaureate-level writing requirement of the student’s curriculum. We’ll read and discuss seven of Shakespeare’s plays and experiment with scene readings. We’ll also watch play-scenes on video and, if possible, see a Chicago Shakespeare Repertory production of a Shakespeare play at Navy Pier. Assignments: three very short (2-page) papers (10% each of grade), one 8-to-10-pg. researched paper (25%), final exam (25%), class participation (20%). For written work, students should familiarize themselves with the policies and procedures in the undergraduate catalogue that pertain to academic honesty. “Class participation” means reading carefully, showing up, coming to class prepared to share comments and questions, and listening with respectful attention to others’ comments and questions.

Plays and works: The Taming of the Shrew, sonnets, The Merchant of Venice, 1 Henry IV, Coriolanus, Macbeth, Hamlet, Cymbeline. Texts: Folger editions, in bookstore. Other editions may be allowed, but please check with me first.



English 4720: Language Variation in American English

Tuesdays and Thursdays, 10:00 - 11:50; Brown 3045
Dr. Paul Johnston

This course illustrates the interplay between language variation and social structures, groupings and speakers' linguistic attitudes and how these influence the formation, maintenance, use, and decline (if any) of dialects of English, with emphasis on those found in North America. Students learn the educational implications of such variation, how writers exploit it as a resource, and the methodology dialectologists and sociolinguists use to study it. They are introduced to how factors like geography, race/ethnicity and gender affect and are reflected in language variation, both within English and in respect to other languages spoken in the United States and Canada, and do projects involving researching dialect variation first-hand.



English 4720: Language Variation in American English

Mondays and Wednesdays, 4:00 - 5:50; Brown 3045
Dr. Lisa Minnick

From the Catalogue: English 4720 is the study of regional and social varieties of American English from sociolinguistic perspectives, focusing on the forces that influence different types of language variation. It examines issues of linguistic bias and offers a multi-cultural perspective on the role of language in daily life.

Course description, purpose, and objectives: In this course, we will discuss the theories and practices of language variation research, particularly as applied to American English. In doing so, we will consider approaches to the study of language variation, with attention to key figures, studies, and methodologies. We will discuss the functions and effects of dialectal variation, and how factors such as geography, ethnicity, gender, social status and other extralinguistic variables interact with language and contribute to variation. We will also explore how popular perceptions and attitudes contribute to the differential valuation of American English varieties and the effects of these valuations. Finally, students will learn the skills and practices of linguistic research and language description and apply these skills to original research projects.



English 4790: Writing in the Secondary School

Tuesdays and Thursdays, 10:00 - 11:50; Brown 3037
Dr. Jon Bush

Built around concepts of 'best practice,' this course includes intensive study and practice of all aspects of teaching writing at middle and secondary schools and will focus on concepts of audience, purpose, and genre as they apply to the processes of writing. We will practice all the skills that make an effective writing teacher – planning, development, response, grading, and classroom activities that support students’ writing processes. We will also touch on grammar, technology, and the effect of Common Core Standards on classroom practices. The course typically concludes with a practical demonstration of teaching, either at WMU or in local high school or middle school classrooms. Students will leave the course with a firm background in teaching writing.



English 4800: Teaching Literature in Secondary Schools

Monday, 500-8:20; Brown 3037
Dr. Karen Vocke

English 4800 is a capstone course which considers fundamental questions of why and how to teach literature; we will also focus on recent waves of reform, reader response, cultural studies, and the impact of the internet. Using both reader response and cultural studies approaches, we will examine the ways that culture and literature intersect to inform--and transform--our practice. We will use a thematic approach to explore a variety of themes in a problem-posing, student-led format.

Of special emphasis in this section of 4800 are the following: examining the reading process—how effective readers engage texts and use strategies to make the most of their reading experiences; understanding the history, current state, and influence of the English literary canon; examining issues of censorship, and designing curriculum and lessons sensitive to students of diverse abilities and backgrounds.

A variety of technologies are examined in this class: digital storytelling, website creation, wikis, webquests, and podcasting, to name a few. Guest speakers will include area teachers and administrators.

For additional information, contact Dr. Karen Vocke.

English 4800: Teaching Literature in Secondary Schools

Tuesdays and Thursdays, 12:00 - 1:50; Brown 3045
Dr. Allen Webb

This section of English 4800 will ground students in traditional approaches to literature pedagogy while simultaneously focusing on reform movements in literature instruction including reader response, cultural studies, and the digital literacy. After the first part of the course led by the instructor, students will take significant responsibility for course leadership as we explore approaches to teaching literature.

For over a generation the reader response movement has generated reform in secondary English teaching. Yet, in confronting a wide range of students, content questions, and social and cultural issues, reader response approaches fall short. Potential answers and new directions for English teaching have emerged under the umbrella of "cultural studies." This course contends that the starting point for curriculum and teaching methodology for teaching literature is addressing what literary works are about, what literary works mean, as well as how they mean, in historical, cultural, political and social contexts including those of the student and the world we live in today.

By focusing on difficult and potentially controversial cultural studies curricular themes during the student-led portion of the course, future teachers will gain understanding of issues involved in teaching literature at the secondary level, see Course Goals. You may also want to review the WMU teacher education Program Goals, which are the basis for the evaluation of intern teaching.

Changes in information technology are offering to extend and reshape the teaching of literature. The inherited cultural archive is now available in digital format on-line and with complementary resources that far exceed what is available in textbooks. A wide range of digital tools and resources for reading, writing, and thinking about literature are now available.

Class will be held in a new, wireless, laptop classroom in Brown Hall specifically designed for English education courses. This room will allow us to integrate technology into literature teaching in a "classroom of the future." Our class will be organized by our on-line syllabus that also serves as an electronic, hyperlinked, textbook.

All students will develop and publish their own teaching website, both a portfolio of work and a real-world working site for future teaching.

A significant portion of the class will be student-led, as we explore the development of response-based, cultural studies literature teaching within the context of NCTE and the State of Michigan standards, content expectations, and model curriculums.

As the capstone experience for English Education majors, this course entails an exciting variety of professional activities and responsibilities. Students are expected to attend a professional English teacher's conference, for example the MCTE sponsored "Bright Ideas Conference" in Lansing on Saturday April 10 or the Michigan Reading Association Conference, in Detroit March 20-22. You should also join NCTE, MCTE, and/or MRA and read regularly the English Journal or Voices from the Middle. The English Companion Ning is a remarkable resource with over 17,000 members.

For further information consult allenwebb.net.


English 5300: Medieval Literature

Tuesdays, 4:00 - 6:20; Brown 4035
Dr. Eve Salisbury

Since the publication of J. L. Austin’s How to Do Things with Words (1962), the concept of performativity has developed and changed over the years, becoming ever more expansive in its implications for language use, gender identity, and transformative potentialities of various sorts. Medieval scholars whose study of this phenomenon in relation to oral/aural narratives, their transposition to written documents, and the transmission of new ideas, ideologies, legal principles, and some of the most significant concerns of everyday life have contributed significantly to the ways in which performativity may be understood. From matters of war and woe to questions of love and marriage to constructions of safe havens and pleasure zones, many of the works we study in this course reveal an indomitable premodern desire for imaginative expression. Some narratives retain the bawdy comedy and edgy humor of folk tale; some envision phantasmatic and utopian/dystopian otherworlds; others have been shaped by the writing conventions of the time into sonorous and poignant works of art. Whether read in Middle English or modern translation, all the works studied in this course are provocative and pleasure-producing in some way.

Required Texts [listed in order of use]:
The Lais of Marie de France: New Edition, trans. Glyn Burgess (New York: Penguin, 1999).
Middle English Breton Lays, ed. Anne Laskaya and Eve Salisbury (Kalamazoo: Medieval Institute Publications, 1995).
Hildegard of Bingen: Selected Writings, ed. Mark Atherton (New York: Penguin)
Abelard & Heloise: The Letters and Other Writings, trans. William Levitan (New York: Hackett, 2007).
Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, ed. and trans. Marie Boroff (New York: Norton, 1967).
Sir Gawain: Eleven Romances and Tales, ed. Thomas Hahn (Kalamazoo: Medieval Institute Publications, 2000).
Pearl, ed. Sarah Stanbury (Kalamazoo: Medieval Institute Publications, 2001).
John Gower, Confessio Amantis, vol. 1, 2nd edition, ed. Russell A. Peck (Kalamazoo: Medieval Publications, 2000).
Christine de Pizan. The Book of the City of Ladies, trans. Earl Jeffrey Richards (New York: Persea, 1982).
Giovanni Boccaccio. Decameron, trans. Guido Waldman (Oxford: Oxford World Classics, 1993).
Select Lyrics (handout)

Supplemental Critical Texts (on reserve):
Mark Amodio, ed. Writing the Oral Tradition: Oral Poetics and Literate Culture in Medieval England.
------. Oral Poetics in Middle English Poetry.
Richard Bauman, Verbal Art as Performance.
Nancy Mason Bradbury, Writing Aloud: Storytelling in Late Medieval England.
------. “Traditional Referentiality: The Aesthetic Power of Oral Traditional Structures,” in Teaching Oral Traditions, ed. John Miles Foley.
John Miles Foley, ed. Teaching Oral Traditions
Elina Gertsman, ed. Visualizing Medieval Performance: Perspectives, Histories, Contexts.
Leslie Stratyner, “The Middle English Romance and the Alliterative Tradition,” in Teaching Oral Traditions, ed. John Miles Foley.
Evelyn Vitz, Orality in Performance in Early French Romance.



English 5360: Romantic Literature

Thursdays, 6:30 - 9:00; Dunbar 4201
Dr. Christopher MacLean Nagle

This fresh incarnation of the department’s core Romanticism course spans the broad range of rich literary offerings produced in Britain from approximately 1780-1830 and will feature the use of electronic resources as part of a non-traditional exploration of a traditional literary period. We will encounter a broad survey of diverse readings from across the genres of British Romanticism—poetry, prose fiction, essays, life-writing, and the visual art created to illustrate some of these literary texts—representing the contributions of both canonical and non-canonical figures. All of the canonical "Big 6" male poets will be present (Blake, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Byron, Shelley, and Keats) as well as the essential voices of women writers such as Charlotte Smith, Mary Wollstonecraft, Hannah More, Helen Maria Williams, Mary Robinson, Anna Laetitia Barbauld, Maria Edgeworth, Mary Tighe, Sydney Owenson, Jane Austen, Mary Shelley, Letitia Elizabeth Landon, and Felicia Hemans.  Ideal for graduate students considering this exam area (or those who simply lack familiarity with some of the most important influences on later writing—both creative and critical—of the 19th and 20th centuries), advanced undergraduates considering graduate school, and anyone wishing to be prepared for teaching Romantic literature, this course will provide a thorough survey of material essential to the field in the 21st century.

During the second half of the semester participants may work with a new experimental "virtual world" (time and technology permitting: TBA) that promises to expand vastly the possibilities of both creative and critical engagement with an early 19th-century "national tale," Sydney Owenson’s /The Wild Irish Girl/. This electronic media resource, /Inismore/, is designed to complement a more traditional reading experience by bringing together a host of interdisciplinary contextual materials to enrich students’ understanding of this challenging and important work. Additional virtual resources we are likely to utilize include the Blake hypertext archive, the Romantic Circles hypertext edition of the /Keepsake for 1829/, and Laura Mandell's Poetess Archive. For those who still consider themselves less tech-savvy, you can rest assured that our primary texts will be available in traditional print form, most of them included in the anthology that will serve as our core text.

This 5000-level course will be conducted seminar-style, which means that the emphasis will be on shared class discussion and other forms of collaborative learning, with brief supplementary mini-lectures introduced when necessary. Students will be expected to make at least one presentation during the course of the semester (including both a written and oral component), to write at least one short response paper and one longer final essay, and--most importantly--to contribute actively to class activities every week without exception.



English 5660: Creative Writing Workshop, Fiction

Tuesdays, 4:00 - 7:30; Brown 4017
Professor Thisbe Nissen

This course focuses on students’ original short fiction, and on close reading of published work in the genre. Students train to be close readers, careful writers, and attentive editors. Our goal will be effective creative and critical articulation: thoughtful and artful production and critique. This course involves substantial amounts of reading and writing, both critical and creative.



English 5660: Creative Writing Workshop, Fiction

Wednesdays, 6:00 - 9:30; Brown 3048
Professor Richard Katrovas

Catalog Description: A workshop and conference course in the writing of fiction, with emphasis on refinement of the individual student’s style and skills.



English 5670: Creative Writing Workshop, Poetry

Mondays, 6:00 - 9:30; Brown 3045
Dr. Nancy Eimers

Art, says poet Carl Phillips, “is its own signature--irreplicable, strange, never seen before, not seeable again elsewhere in the future.” In this advanced poetry writing workshop, we will spend the semester exploring how, in poetry, this might be true. We’ll examine the “signatures” of contemporary poets by reading three contemporary collections, and each week we will consider the individual signatures of class members by workshopping class poems.



English 5680: Creative Writing Workshop, Playwriting

Tuesdays, 6:00 - 9:30; Brown 3003
Dr. Steve Feffer

Catalog Description: A workshop and conference course in playwriting, with emphasis on refinement of the individual student’s style and skills.



English 5970: Studies in English, Variable Topics - Slavery and the American Literary Imagination

Mondays, 4:00 - 6:20; Brown 3002
Dr. Scott Slawinski

How did chattel slavery inform and shape American literary history? This question will guide us as we explore images of slavery from the colonial era, ante- and post-bellum periods, and early twentieth century. Participants will examine a number of genres, including pamphlets, autobiographies, poems, and novels by both white and black writers. While some texts from the colonial period positioned themselves as either anti- or pro-slavery, many others merely represented the institution or used it as a metaphor to discuss other issues like American independence. The antebellum period witnessed a dramatic expansion of texts shaped by the debate over the abolition of slavery, and the post-Civil War era appropriated the memory of slavery as a basis for the authorship of nonfictional and fictional texts. Participants will also read a number of critical texts from historians, literary critics, and possibly postcolonial scholars. For Ph.D. students, the final seminar paper will determine the distribution requirement.

Tentative Booklist:
Against Slavery (Penguin Classic)
Melville, Bartleby and Benito Cereno (Dover Thrift Edition)
Douglass, Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, An American Slave (TBA)
Jacobs, Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl (Dover Thrift Edition)
Stowe, Uncle Tom’s Cabin (TBA)
Hentz, The Planter’s Northern Bride (e-text)
Chesnutt, The Conjure Woman and Other Stories (Penguin Classic)
Twain, Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (TBA)
Twain, Pudd’nhead Wilson (TBA)
Hopkins, Contending Forces (Oxford)
Dixon, The Clansman (Kentucky)
Faulkner, Absalom, Absalom! (TBA)
& Various pdfs posted to e-learning

 

Department of English
6th floor Sprau Tower
Western Michigan University
Kalamazoo MI 49008-5331 USA
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