New Issues Poetry & Prose - WMU
TitlesSubmission GuidelinesOrderingDonateAbout Us

Marni Ludwig

Marni Ludwig

Marni Ludwig is also the author of Little Box of Cotton and Lightning, selected by Susan Howe for a 2011 Poetry Society of America Chapbook Fellowship. She holds degrees from Sarah Lawrence College, Columbia University, and Washington University in St. Louis.  Her poems have appeared in Boston Review, Boulevard, FIELD, Gulf Coast, High Chair, JERRY, Western Humanities Review, and other journals. She lives in Athens, GA, where she is a PhD candidate at the University of Georgia, and in Brooklyn, NY.

www.marniludwig.com

 

Pinwheel

PinwheelPinwheel

$15.00 paper | 63 pages
ISBN: 978-1-936970-14-8
Publication Date: March 2013
Buy: Amazon.com | spdbooks.org | Barnes & Noble

Winner of the 2012 New Issues Poetry Prize

Marni Ludwig has a vast and original mind and spirit, which along with her quiet, sometimes sharp humor, and her tenderness, implicate everyone.  Her skill is like a good horse, who becomes one with the rider and with her wild, unheard of travels.  Here is the real thing.
            —Jean Valentine

Like surrealist paintings, these poems construct their psychological truths from real world matter that’s been estranged and made mysterious—think of Dalí, ordinary pocket watches, yes, but now bent to an edge, or draped over the branch of a distant leafless tree, or reclining on something that looks like it might be a body part. And as there, here too, the disquieting landscape has a beating-heart hypnotic logic to it. “The birds sing: systole,/diastole. The puppeteer/appears to be wearing/the same outfit/as her marionette.” I have rarely loved a book of poems as I do this one.
            —Mary Jo Bang

Marni Ludwig’s work exhibits the keen symptoms of some kind of magic. That which we lov’st well— the breathtaking violence of precision, the transcendence. From what “Where” could these adumbrated machines have issued? The heart is handsome and the craft is shot with lucency. And all this takes place intravenously. Ruin reigns. Beauty is all over the place! I’ve been waiting for this book to happen for a long time.
            —Lucie Brock-Broido

 

Poem

Dying So a Scene May Be Repeated

If it’s four, it’s six.
We’ve not slept.
What I would say now would be
too clear for this light.

The streets we walk
lose half their shade
with morning.

This won’t be settled.
Still, when night comes
we bend

like railwaymen pitching
sand toward the last
blood of a jumper.