Take advantage of global engagement opportunities in April

contact: Korey Force
| WMU News
CELCIS students engaging in conversation

Attend a CELCIS conversation circle to discuss social and local topics with students learning English.

KALAMAZOO, Mich.—Western Michigan University and the extended Kalamazoo community will offer numerous global engagement opportunities in April. Highlights include art exhibits, CELCIS conversation circles, jewelry making, family concerts and a choreography showcase.

Opportunities to get globally engaged are published weekly at wmich.edu/global/events by WMU's Haenicke Institute for Global Education.

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April 2018 opportunities

Monday, April 2

  • African American and African studies open house—11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. in 1115 Moore Hall, hosted by the College of Arts and Sciences. Learn about the reinstated major and minor in African American and African studies. Free and open to the public.
  • CELCIS conversation circle—2 to 3 p.m. in the fourth-floor reception area of Ellsworth Hall, hosted by the Center for English Language and Culture for International Students. Join students learning English in relaxed conversation about local and social topics. Free and open to the public.
  • "Education Equity: From the 'Kalamazoo Case' to the 'Kalamazoo Promise' and Beyond" lecture—6 p.m. in 204 Bernhard Center, hosted by the Center for the Study of Ethics in Society. Join this lecture series discussion with panelists Jim Robb, general counsel and associate dean of alumni and public relations, WMU Cooley Law School; Cyekeia Lee, director of outreach and partnerships, Kalamazoo Promise; Michael Evans, executive director, Kalamazoo Literacy Council; and Sandra Standish, executive director, KC Ready 4s. Free and open to the public.
  • Introduction to Arabic Language—6:30 to 7:30 p.m. at the Kalamazoo Public Library Oshtemo Branch Community Room, 7265 W Main St., Kalamazoo, hosted by the Kalamazoo Public Library. This six-week course is a basic introduction to the Arabic language for beginners. All materials are provided; registration is limited.

Tuesday, April 3

  • "International Research: Opportunities and Challenges," Discover Discovery research workshop—12:30 to 1:45 at the Fetzer Center, hosted by Research at WMU. This session will provide an overview of some of the opportunities that are available for international partnerships and conducting research. Registration is required by the Friday prior to each workshop.
  • CELCIS conversation circle—2 to 3 p.m. in the Bernhard Center Bronco Global Lounge, hosted by the Center for English Language and Culture for International Students. Join students learning English in relaxed conversation about local and social topics. Free and open to the public.

Wednesday, April 4

  • "Healthy Relationships" Lyceum Lecture Series—noon in the Lee Honors College lounge, hosted by the Lee Honors College. Talk given by Dr. Gary Bischof, dean of the Lee Honors College, and Dr. Jou-Chen Chen, family and consumer services. Free and open to the public.
  • CELCIS conversation circle—2 to 3 p.m. in the fourth-floor reception area of Ellsworth Hall, hosted by the Center for English Language and Culture for International Students. Join students learning English in relaxed conversation about local and social topics. Free and open to the public.
  • "Interviews in Fieldwork" research briefing in global studies—3 to 4 p.m. in 3025 Brown Hall, hosted by the global and International Studies Program. This talk features Chien-Juh Gu and Greg Veeck. Free and open to the public.
  • Meg Tang Jewelry—4:30 to 5:30 p.m. at the Kalamazoo Public Library Alma Powell Branch Douglass Community Center, 1000 W. Paterson St., Kalamazoo, hosted by the Kalamazoo Public Library. Make jewelry using found items, wire, and more with local artist Meg Tang. Registration is free.

Thursday, April 5

  • CELCIS conversation circle (women only)—2 to 3 p.m. in the Bernhard Center Bronco Global Lounge, hosted by the Center for English Language and Culture for International Students. Join students learning English in relaxed conversation about local and social topics. Free and open to the public.

Friday, April 6

  • "Cuba: Culture and Society" lecture—11 a.m. to noon at the Fountains at Bronson Place, 1700 Bronson Way, Kalamazoo, hosted by the Osher Lifelong Learning Institute. The lecture will be given by Dr. Kristina Wirtz, professor of Spanish at WMU. Registration is $30 for lecture series; open to the public.

Saturday, April 7

  • Exhibition Opens: Vibrant Bounty, Chinese Folk Art—11 a.m. at the Kalamazoo Institute of Arts, 314 S. Park St., Kalamazoo, hosted by the Kalamazoo Institute of Arts. Journey through the Shaanxi Province through folk paintings and artifacts of rural China. Free and open to the public.

Monday, April 9

  • CELCIS conversation circle—2 to 3 p.m. in the fourth-floor reception area of Ellsworth Hall, hosted by the Center for English Language and Culture for International Students. Join students learning English in relaxed conversation about local and social topics. Free and open to the public.
  • "Classified: Who in the World is Merze Tate?" discussion—6 to 7:30 p.m. at the Kalamazoo Public Library Eastwood Branch Community Room, 1112 Gayle Ave., Kalamazoo, hosted by the Kalamazoo Public Library. Come hear Sonya Bernard- Hollins as she walks us through her new book and tells us about Merze Tate, the first African American graduate of Western Michigan Teachers College. Free and open to the public.

Tuesday, April 10

  • "Salsa, Soul and Spirit in a Multicultural Age" diversity program—9:30 a.m. and 1:30 p.m. at Chenery Auditorium, 714 S. Westnedge Ave., Kalamazoo, hosted by Kalamazoo County. Juana Bordas, president of Mestiza Leadership International, is the featured speaker for Kalamazoo County's 20th annual Respecting Differences program, which seeks to illustrate the richness and wisdom that diversity brings to the workplace.
  • "Photographing Potawatomi Regalia" artbreak talk—noon to 1 p.m. at the Kalamazoo Institute of Arts, 314 S. Park St., Kalamazoo, hosted by the Kalamazoo Institute of Arts. Photographer Sharon Hoogstraten speaks about her photographic portraits of Potawatomi Indians, with special focus on the designs and meanings of their regalia. Free and open to the public.
  • International Ladies Sports Club—2 to 3 p.m. at the Student Recreation Center, hosted by International Student Activities. Bond with women from all over the world through sports and exercise. Free and open to all women in the community.
  • CELCIS conversation circle—2 to 3 p.m. in the Bernhard Center Bronco Global Lounge, hosted by the Center for English Language and Culture for International Students. Join students learning English in relaxed conversation about local and social topics. Free and open to the public.

Wednesday, April 11

  • CELCIS conversation circle—2 to 3 p.m. in the fourth-floor reception area of Ellsworth Hall, hosted by the Center for English Language and Culture for International Students. Join students learning English in relaxed conversation about local and social topics. Free and open to the public.
  • "Environmental Justice" talk—6 to 8 p.m. in the Trimpe Building Multicultural Center, hosted by the Office of Diversity and Inclusion. The talk will be given by Laura Donders, intern coordinator in the Office for Sustainability. Free and open to the public.
  • Contemporary Religious Art in Ethiopia art league—6:30 p.m. at the Kalamazoo Institute of Arts, 314 S. Park St., Kalamazoo, hosted by the KIA. Learn about Ethiopian religious art from Dr. Raymond Silverman, the founding Director of the University of Michigan's Museum Studies Program. Open to the public; $12 for the general public, $10 for KIA members, and $3 for students.
  • "America Divided" film festival—7 to 9 p.m. at the Bernhard Center North Ballroom, hosted by the Walker Institute for the Study of Race and Ethnic Relations, FemiNOW, FOCUS Kalamazoo, and Sincerely From. Attend a film festival focusing on inequality in everyday lives with "A House Divided" a movie about New York City's affordability crisis. Doors open at 6:30 p.m; Free and open to the public.

Thursday, April 12

  • CELCIS conversation circle (women only)—2 to 3 p.m. in the Bernhard Center Bronco Global Lounge, hosted by the Center for English Language and Culture for International Students. Join students learning English in relaxed conversation about local and social topics. Free and open to the public.
  • "Inequality, Citizenship and the Promise of Education talk—7 p.m. in 2452 Knauss Hall, hosted by the University Center for the Humanities. The talk will be given by Daniella Allen, professor of government and in the Graduate School of Education at Harvard University and director of the Edmond J. Safra Center for Ethics. Free and open to the public.

Saturday, April 14

  • Kalamazoo Color Run 5k—10 a.m. at Arcadia Creek Festival Place, 145 E. Water St., Kalamazoo, hosted by the Kalamazoo Color Run. Bringing people together and make the world a happier, healthier place by creating an experience that’s more about the memories you make than your mile per minute, we made running feel accessible to a broader demographic. Registration costs may vary.
  • Spring Choreographer Showcase—6:30 to 7:30 p.m. at the Rootead Enrichment Center, 1501 Fulford St., Kalamazoo, hosted by Rootead. Witness movement arts from Kalamazoo and surrounding communities. Tickets are $8 to $10; open to the public.

Monday, April 16

Thursday, April 19

  • American Promise Panel Discussion—7 to 8:30 p.m. at the Kalamazoo Public Library Van Deusen Room, 315 S. Rose St., Kalamazoo, hosted by the Kalamazoo Public Library. Watch clips from the "American Promise" documentary and hear from a panel of community members on these issues, moderated by Jacob Pinney-Johnson of the Fatherhood Network. Free and open to the public.

Friday, April 20

  • "Nomadic Forms: Sculpture Inspired from Tibetan Plateau" lecture—11 a.m. to noon at the Fountains at Bronson Place, 1700 Bronson Way, Kalamazoo, hosted by the Osher Lifelong Learning Institute. The lecture will be given by Patrick Wilson, sculpture-area coordinator in the Gwen Frostic School of Art and assistant professor of art. Registration is $30 for lecture series; open to the public.

Saturday, April 21

  • Chasing Chopin concert—7:30 p.m. at the Little Theatre, hosted by the Gilmore Keyboard Festival. Alpin Hong performs a daring mashup of autobiographical storytelling and dazzling piano performance. Tickets are $5 for adults and kids are free; open to the public.

Sunday, April 22

Thursday, April 26

  • Christan Sands Trio Concert—at 6:30 and 9:30 p.m. at Bell's Brewery, 355 E. Kalamazoo Ave., Kalamazoo, hosted by the Gilmore Keyboard Festival. Listen to jazz pianist Christian Sands fuse swing, bebop, progressive, Brazilian, and Afro-Cuban styles. Tickets are $30; open to the public.

Sunday, April 29

  • Daniil Trifonov conert—2 p.m. in the Dalton Center Recital Hall, hosted by the Gilmore Keyboard Festival. Listen to Russian pianist Daniil Trifonov play the music of Bartók, Prokofiev, Messiaen, and more. Tickets are $35, $25, and $15, reserved seating.

For more WMU news, arts and events, visit wmich.edu/news.