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Academic Scheduling

The mission of academic acheduling is to provide support to academic departments in the development of the schedule of classes and assignment of classroom space. Classroom facilities are primarily for use by students, faculty and staff for activities and programs that are directly related to the basic educational functions of teaching, research, and preparation of scholarly material. Every effort will be made to ensure that classrooms are assigned fairly, used appropriately, and accommodate the University’s academic and instructional needs. The Registrar’s Office maintains a central record of all assignments, which is the only official source of information about class meeting locations.

Effective class and academic classroom scheduling is critical to the academic mission of the University. It enables students to take the classes they need in a timely manner and contributes to on-going cost containment efforts through efficient space utilization and good stewardship of our valuable institutional resources.

Academic classroom scheduling is a dynamic process requiring evaluation of class size, equipment specifications, and pedagogical changes each term. The assignment of a specific room at a specific time in a given term will not automatically guarantee a continuing assignment of that space. While endeavors are made to allocate to each course the room best suited to its needs, it is not always possible to assign an individual class to the room preferred by the instructor. To best utilize classroom space, deans and department chairs should observe the academic scheduling protocol when building their course schedules.

This academic scheduling policy has been developed to ensure that both classes and classrooms are scheduled efficiently to support the needs of students, faculty, and the institution as a whole. All departments are encouraged to refer to this policy when planning classes or events that require the use of classrooms.

Academic Scheduling Protocol

Classroom Information Resources