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Abstracts from Volume 35, Number 4
(December, 2008)


ESTABLISHING A BASIS FOR MULTI-SYSTEM
COLLABORATION: SYSTEMIC TEAM DEVELOPMENT

Rosalyn M. Bertram

Reports of child sexual abuse require police, child protective services, forensic and medical evaluators, prosecutors, family court and treatment providers to negotiate complementary, overlapping roles with children and families. Administrators from these agencies in Kansas City, Missouri clarified this multi-system response by applying
a theory-based model for team development previously studied in direct practice with families. This article presents that model and an exploratory case study of this effort. Findings suggest the model’s efficacy for resolving inter-agency conflict and may contribute to constructing logic models in multi-system collaboration.

AFRICAN AMERICAN GRANDMOTHERS PROVIDING EXTENSIVE CARE TO THEIR GRANDCHILDREN: SOCIO-DEMOGRAPHIC AND HEALTH DETERMINANTS OF LIFE SATISFACTION
Dorothy Smith-Ruiz

The article explores the relationships between grandmothers’ socioeconomic and health characteristics in relation to life satisfaction. Reasons for caregiving, assumption of the caregiver role, and grandmothers’ attitudes and experiences in custodial caregiving were discussed qualitatively from data gathered in detailed interviews of a convenience sample of 99 custodial African American grandmothers
caring for one or more grandchildren younger than 18 in North Carolina. Most grandmothers in this sample reported mixed feelings toward custodial caregiving, both as a burden as well as a blessing. They also reported a weak support system and relied on their faith more than family and friends to continue in their caregiving roles.

POLICY MANDATED COLLABORATION
Jan Ivery

This exploratory study examined the collaborative strategy used by Tri Cities Partnership (TCP) to facilitate the collaborative process required by the United States Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) to receive Continuum of Care funding. The study examined partner perceptions of TCP’s leadership, organizational structure, benefits and drawbacks of participation, and relationships with partners. A follow-up survey and key informant interviews explored themes related to organizational affiliation with TCP, benefits and drawbacks of participation, relationships with partners, challenges impacting the ability of TCP to facilitate collaboration and strategies for involving key stakeholders. The study also identified factors that motivate and limit organizational involvement in community partnerships formed in response to policy and funding mandates for collaboration.

RETHINKING SOCIAL WORK’S ROLE IN PUBLIC ASSISTANCE
Julie Cooper Altman and Gertrude Schaffner Goldberg

This article presents an argument for revisiting social work’s relationship to public assistance in the wake of 10 years of welfare reform. Three case studies drawn from a mixed-method study of the quality of life of former TANF recipients illustrate the range,
depth and complexity of the needs of persons while they are on the welfare rolls, transitioning off and living without cash relief. The article briefly traces the history of social work’s commitment to and provision of social services for this population and
argues that it may be time to revisit the profession’s role in public assistance. In light of history and a review of welfare “leaver” studies and the authors’ research, the article suggests interventions that could improve service to the poor, both on and off
cash relief. The role of social work in advocating for changes in welfare policy, program and practice contexts is also discussed.

RACIAL/ETHNIC DIFFERENCES IN RELIGIOUS CONGREGATION-BASED SOCIAL SERVICE DELIVERY EFFORTS
R. Khari Brown

The current study utilizes Swidler’s (1986) cultural toolkit theory to explain racial/ethnic differences in American religious congregations’ provision of social service programs. This study suggests that black Americans’ reliance upon structural tools to assess poverty contributes to their congregations being more heavily involved than majority white congregations in the provision of social services that attempt to make a longer-term impact on community life (i.e. academic tutoring and job training). In contrast, white Americans’ greater reliance upon individualistic tools to understand
poverty arguably contributes to their congregations being more heavily involved in the provision of programs that have a shorter- term impact on community life (i.e. food, thrift, and shelter). While majority Latino congregations are less likely than are black
congregations to provide longer-term impacting programs only, majority Asian congregations tend to be less heavily involved in the provision of both longer and shorter term impacting programs.

A BOILING POT OF ANIMOSITY OR AN ALLIANCE OFKINDRED SPIRITS? EXPLORING CONNECTIONS BETWEEN NATIVE AMERICANS AND AFRICAN AMERICANS
Hilary N. Weaver

The relationship between indigenous people and people of African heritage in the United States is a long and complex one. An examination of historical and contemporary connections between indigenous persons and African Americans not only clarifies complex and frequently overlooked parts of American history but sets
the stage for examining future possibilities. It is useful for helping professionals to understand these relationships since this history may serve as the basis for positive connections or animosities between clients and professionals. This article begins with a discussion of selected historical intersections between these populations that highlight the complex and varied nature of contacts between these groups. Examples of contemporary interactions illustrate the ongoing, multidimensional nature of connections between Native Americans and African Americans. Implications for the helping professions are drawn from the material presented.

“I’M GLAD YOU ASKED”: HOMELESS CLIENTS WITH SEVERE MENTAL ILLNESS EVALUATE THEIR RESIDENTIAL CARE
Katherine Tyson McCrea and Lesa Spravka

Homeless clients with severe mental illness can offer considerable insight about their residential care, but there are significant methodological challenges in eliciting their service evaluations: maximizing participation, facilitating self-expression, and preserving clients’ natural meanings. This study addresses those challenges and presents qualitative data residential care staff obtained from 210 clients. While clients prioritized meeting their subsistence needs, they emphasized attaining inner well-being and mutually respectful relationships, and that group services needed to reduce confrontational interactions in order to be helpful. For after-care services, clients sought sustained relationships with staff grounded in client initiative, combining
respect for their autonomy with psychosocial support.

BOOK REVIEWS

Gangs in the Global City: Alternatives to Traditional Criminology. John M. Hagedorn, Editor.
Reviewed by Matthew T. Theriot.

Saving Children from a Life of Crime: Early Risk Factors and Effective Interventions.
David P. Farrington and Brandon C.Welsh.
Reviewed by Stephanie Cosner Berzin.

Why Welfare States Persist: The Importance of Public Opinion in Democracies.
Clem Brooks and Jeff Manza.
Reviewed by Allan Brawley.

Survival of the Knitted: Immigrant Social Networks in a Stratified World.
Vilna Francine Bashi.
Reviewed by Qingwen Xu.

The Lost Promise of Civil Rights.
Risa L. Goluboff.
Reviewed by Wilma Peebles-Wilkins.

Citizen Lobbyists: Local Efforts to Influence Public Policy.

Brian Adams. Reviewed by Michael Woodford.

Wives without Husbands: Marriage, Desertion and Welfare
in New York, 1900-1935.
Anna R. Igra.
Reviewed by Laura Curran.

BOOK NOTES

Contested Lands: Israel-Palestine, Kashmir, Bosnia, Cyprus and
Sri Lanka.
Sumantra Bose.

Revitalising Communities in a Globalising World.
Lena Dominelli, Editor.

Dynamics of Social Welfare Policy: Right versus Left.

Gardenia Harris, Bernard Ivan Tamas, and Nancy S. Lind

Racial Diversity and Social Capital: Equality and Community in America.
Rodney E. Hero.

Social Security in Ireland, 1939-1952: The Limits to Solidarity.

Sophia Carey.

Opting Out? Why Women Really Quit Careers and Head Home.
Pamela Stone.

The Politics, Economics, and Culture of Mexican-US
Migration: Both Sides of the Border.
Edward Ashbee, Helene
Balsev Clausen, and Carl Pedersen, Editors.

INDEX OF VOLUME XXXV, ISSUES 1-4

 

 

 

 

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