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Shelley Aurand
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Clifford Pulley III
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Cameron Tew

Cameron Tew

Taking supply chain savvy to nation’s capital

With General Motors and American Axle internships under his belt and an independent study project done in collaboration with Mercedes Benz Technology, Cameron Tew seemed slated for a career in the auto industry.

Instead, the Rochester, Mich., resident and recent WMU graduate has leveraged his experience and status as a nationally honored supply chain management scholar to land a Washington, D.C., post as a consultant with IBM’s public sector section.

Tew came to WMU specifically for its Integrated Supply Chain Management Program. Part of the Haworth College of Business, the 19-year-old program made its national rankings debut in 2011, placing 12th on a list of the best undergraduate programs.

“I was looking for a college in Michigan, and something just clicked for me at WMU,” says Tew, whose older brother also is a Bronco. “It was the perfect fit for me.”

Tew is one of two WMU supply chain management majors to be awarded a 2011 Richter Scholarship—a national award that identifies, nurtures and fast tracks the nation’s future leaders into the discipline. Tew and fellow senior Christopher Mulcahy, of Livonia, Mich., constitute 20 percent of the nation’s Richter Scholars honored that year.

As an undergraduate intern, Tew led an industry team to build an electronic filing system for sensitive documents in American Axle’s purchasing department, eliminating manual paper searches for critical records.

As a GM intern, he worked in customer care and after-sales, designing a system that allows the company to order parts more efficiently by finding what he calls “the sweet spot" between the savings of ordering parts in large quantities and the cost of warehousing those parts over the life of the product.

“For me personally, the most exciting feature about supply chain management is that it requires my work to be results-driven,” Tew says. “I take pride in pointing to an implemented system or accomplished cost savings as an example of my team's ability to create a positive outcome.”