Real Talk Diversity Series 2018-19

Accessibility

Please notify the director for diversity education at (269) 387-6324 or lindsey.palar@wmich.edu, if accommodations are needed to make the event accessible for you or your guests.

RaceTalk Panels: Sharing Racialized experiences through narrative

RaceTalk Panel presentations provide unique access to diverse narratives of individuals that have been trained to interrogate their racialized experience through narrative.  Participants will have the opportunity to listen to diverse human experiences that are similar and vastly different to their racial experience.  Additionally, this model offers the opportunity to ask questions that individuals may not have felt safe enough to articulate about race before.  This model gives participants access to resources (e.g., books, movies, online articles and videos) to help facilitate their racial identity development process. Community partners: Racial Literacy Advocates, LLC.

  • Monday, Sept. 24, 2018 from 5 to 7:30 p.m. in Wood Hall, Rm. 1001.
  • Thursday, Oct. 11, 2018 from 5 to 7:30 p.m. in the Multicultural Center in the Adrian Trimpe Building.
  • Monday, Nov. 19, 2018 from 1 to 3:30 p.m. in the Multicultural Center in the Adrian Trimpe Building.

"'68: How far have we come?" Black History 101 Mobile Museum exhibit

Using original artifacts from the exhibit, Khalid el-Hakim will make present-day connections with the past by inviting the audience to engage in an honest dialogue about the impact of racism and the struggle for social justice in America. Campus partners: Richmond Center for the Arts; Center for the Study of Ethics in Society.

  • Tuesday, Sept. 25 and Wednesday, Sept. 26, 2018 from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. in the Atrium of the Richmond Center for Visual Arts.

"The truth Hurts: Black History, Honesty, and Healing the Racial Divide" 

Khalid el-Hakim’s talk will center on the development of the Black History 101 Mobile Museum with a focus on the current exhibit "’68: How Far Have We Come?"

Khalid el-Hakim is an educator, entrepreneur, founder and curator of the Black History 101 Mobile Museum, a collection of more than 7,000 original artifacts of Black memorabilia dating from the trans-Atlantic slave trade era to hip-hop culture. Khalid has been called the "Schomburg of the Hip-Hop generation" because of his passionate commitment to carrying on the rich tradition of the Black Museum Movement.  He has received national and international attention for his innovative work of exhibiting Black history outside of traditional museum spaces.  Most recently Khalid was named one of the 100 Men of Distinction for 2017 by the highly respected business magazine Black Enterprise. el-Hakim taught social studies in Detroit for 15 years and is currently a doctoral student in the College of Education at the University of Illinois (Champaign-Urbana). Campus partners: Richmond Center for the Arts; Center for the Study of Ethics in Society.

  • Tuesday, Sept. 25, 2018 from 3:30 to 5 p.m. in Rm. 2008 of the Richmond Center for Visual Arts.

Film Screening and discussion: 'Dolores'

Join campus and local community members in learning more about Dolores Huerta, co-founder of the first farm workers' unions and steadfast activist to this day.  Her tireless work toward labor rights, racial justice, and gender equity are honored in this film and will be discussed by guest panelists directly following the film.

  • Thursday, Sept. 27, 2018 from 6 to 8:30 p.m. in Brown Hall, Rm. 1028. Light refreshments provided.

'How Far Have we Come?' Black history 101 mobile Museum Follow-up Discussion

Following Khalid el-Hakim's Black History 101 Mobile Museum at the Richmond Center on Sept. 25 and 26, participants are invited to join the Office of Diversity and Inclusion and additional campus partners working toward racial justice and equity to share reactions and generate ideas for creating social change. 

  • Thursday, Oct. 4, 2018 from 3:30 to 5 p.m. in the Multicultural Center in the Adrian Trimpe Building. Light refreshments provided.

Seeking Access, togetherness, and meaning 

Campus community members will discuss their experiences with migrant farm work, family, and college access at this interactive presentation. Campus partners: WMU College Assistance Migrant Program (CAMP).

  • Wednesday, Oct. 24, 2018 from 3:30 to 5 p.m. in the Multicultural Center in the Adrian Trimpe Building. Light refreshments provided.

El Día de los muertos interactive exhibit

This exhibit will celebrate El Día de Los Muertos, Day of the Dead, a multi-day celebration most strongly associated with Mexico, where the tradition originated and pre-dated the arrival of Europeans. Observers of El Día de Los Muertos honor friends and family members who have died and offer support for their spiritual journeys. The first day is set aside to remember the children, and the second day is to honor the memory of adult relatives. Each year the celebration is marked by preparation of foods in honor of those relatives who have departed. Today, El Día de Los Muertos is acknowledged and celebrated internationally and among a range of cultures. Campus Partners: WMU Department of Spanish.

  • Thursday, Nov. 1 through Tuesday, Nov. 6, 2018 during Waldo Library hours on the Second Floor of Waldo Library.

Moving toward Cultural Humility: A Lifelong Process

Participants are invited to engage with a panel of campus community members on the topic of cultural humility and the notion that, “Cultural humility is a lifelong process of self-reflection and self-critique whereby the individual not only learns about another’s culture, but one starts with an examination of her/his own beliefs and cultural identities” (Tervalon & Murray-Garcia, 1998). Campus partners: Haenicke Institute for Global Education; Office of Precollege Programming.

  • Tuesday, Nov. 13, 2018 from 5:30 to 7 p.m. in the Multicultural Center in the Adrian Trimpe Building. Light refreshments provided.

Transgender Day of visibility Celebration

In celebration of Trans Day of Visibility (TDOV), campus and community participants are invited to join in this celebration and show support for the transgender community. Activities will recognize the livelihood and empowerment that transgender individuals demonstrate daily around the globe. In addition, ideas and knowledge for addressing cissexism and transphobia will be shared. Campus partner: LBGT Student Services.

  • Thursday, March 28, 2019 from 4 to 5:30 p.m. in the Multicultural Center in the Adrian Trimpe Building. Light refreshments provided.

Celebrating us all: Asian Pacific American Heritage

In celebration of the history of Asian American and Pacific Islanders' enrichment of the United States and the important role of Asian American and Pacific Islanders in our future, campus and local community members are invited to participate in festivities in honor of a range of Asian Pacific American traditions and experiences. Campus partner: WMU Asian Pacific American Student Association (APASA).
  • Thursday, April 4, 2019 from 5:30 to 7 p.m. in the Multicultural Center in the Adrian Trimpe Building. Light refreshments provided.