Global Events Archive

For more information about previous events, please contact the Haenicke Institute at wmu-international@wmich.edu or call (269) 387-5890.

October 2018

Monday, October 1

  • CELCIS conversation circle—2 to 3 p.m. in the fourth-floor reception area of Ellsworth Hall, hosted by the Center for English Language and Culture for International Students. Join students learning English in relaxed conversation about local and social topics. Free.
  • Maria Erazo: Author in Search of my Father—6 to 7 p.m. at the Kalamazoo Public Library Eastwood Branch, 1112 Gayle St., Kalamazoo, hosted by the Kalamazoo Public Library. Meet the author of "In Search of My Father," an inspirational biography that shares the struggles of a family amidst adversity and one woman’s dream. Free.
  • Multicultural Review—6 p.m. at the Bernhard Center, hosted by the Office of Diversity and Inclusion. The Multicultural Review is an event where students showcase their talents in poetry, reading, music, dance, and much more. Free.

Tuesday, October 2

  • CELCIS conversation circle—2 to 3 p.m. in the fourth-floor reception area of Ellsworth Hall, hosted by the Center for English Language and Culture for International Students. Join students learning English in relaxed conversation about local and social topics. Free.
  • How F.D.R Segregated Kalamazoo—6 to 7 p.m. at the Kalamazoo Public Library Alma Powell Branch, 1000 W Paterson St., Kalamazoo, hosted by the Kalamazoo Public Library. Join us for a presentation and discussion about the history of redlining, racially restrictive covenants, and segregation in Kalamazoo. Learn how the federal government and the city of Kalamazoo successfully financed white home ownership while instituting black segregation. Free.
  • Pizza & Pages: Hispanic Heritage Month—6:30 to 7:30 p.m. at the Kalamazoo Public Library Oshtemo Branch, 7265 W Main St., Kalamazoo, hosted by the Kalamazoo Public Library. We will be reading "I Am not Your Perfect Mexican Daughter," by Erika Sánchez. Read it and come back to talk about it with pizza! Registration is required; free.

Wednesday, October 3

  • "African American Studies in Action: The Call to Public Scholarship," AAAS Brown Bang Talks—noon to 1 p.m. at 1101 Moore Hall, hosted by the African American and African Studies program. This talk will be presented by Dr. Michelle Johnson. Free.
  • CELCIS conversation circle—2 to 3 p.m. in the fourth-floor reception area of Ellsworth Hall, hosted by the Center for English Language and Culture for International Students. Join students learning English in relaxed conversation about local and social topics. Free.
  • Pizza & Pages: Hispanic Heritage Month—6:30 to 7:30 p.m. at the Kalamazoo Public Library Washington Square Branch, 1244 Portage St., Kalamazoo, hosted by the Kalamazoo Public Library. We will be reading "I Am not Your Perfect Mexican Daughter," by Erika Sánchez. Read it and come back to talk about it with pizza! Registration is required; free.

Thursday, October 4

  • CELCIS conversation circle—2 to 3 p.m. in the fourth-floor reception area of Ellsworth Hall, hosted by the Center for English Language and Culture for International Students. Join students learning English in relaxed conversation about local and social topics. Free.
  • "How Far Have We Come?" exhibit— 3:30 p.m. at the Trimpe Multicultural Center, hosted by the Center of Ethics in Society and facilitated by the Office for Diversity and Inclusion. Black History 101 Mobile Museum exhibit follow-up discussion. Free.

Saturday, October 6

  • Parade of Flags at the WMU Homecoming game—noon to 1 p.m. at Waldo Stadium, hosted by the Haenicke Institute of Global Education. The parade of flags is a colorful display of multicultural diversity on the WMU campus that has become an annual tradition that precedes the WMU Homecoming football game. The event will begin with a tailgate at Kanley Track at 8 a.m. Free. 
  • Great Stories Club: The Hate U Give by Angie Thomas—4 to 6 p.m. at the Fire Historical and Cultural Arts Collaborative "Safe Space", 1249 Portage St., Kalamazoo, hosted by Kalamazoo Public Library and Truth, Racial Healing, and Transformation. Join us for discussion of identity, social justice, and community, based around the remarkable book The Hate U Give by Angie Thomas. Free. 
  • Martin Luther King Jr. Program 50th Anniversary Celebration—7 to 9 p.m. in the Bernhard Center East Ballroom, hosted by the Office of Diversity and Inclusion. This event will recognize fifty years of program success and bring alumni and current participants together to celebrate and reconnect. Admission is $45 per person; Registration required. 

Monday, October 8

  • CELCIS conversation circle—2 to 3 p.m. in the fourth-floor reception area of Ellsworth Hall, hosted by the Center for English Language and Culture for International Students. Join students learning English in relaxed conversation about local and social topics. Free .

Tuesday, October 9

  • CELCIS conversation circle—2 to 3 p.m. in the fourth-floor reception area of Ellsworth Hall, hosted by the Center for English Language and Culture for International Students. Join students learning English in relaxed conversation about local and social topics. Free.
  • ARTbreak talk: Global Glass: Art and Artists—noon to 1 p.m. at the Kalamazoo Institute of Arts (KIA), 314 S Park St., Kalamazoo, hosted by the KIA. Laura Cotton, Curator and Gallery Manager at the Alfred Berkowitz Gallery, will discuss the art and artists that are featured in the Berkowitz glass collection. Free. 
  • Ladies Sports Club—2:30 to 3:30 at the Student Recreation Center, hosted by International Student Activities. Exercise with women from around the world through yoga, body strength training, and more. Classes will meet at 2:25 at the Student Recreation help desk prior to each meeting: Free. 
  • China Town Hall—6 to 7:30 p.m. at the Gerald R. Ford Presidential Museum, 303 Pearl St. NW, Grand Rapids, hosted by the World Affairs Council of Western Michigan. China Town Hall will include and interactive webcast with Condoleezza Ric, former U.S. Secretary of State and National Security Advisory, and an in-person talk with Kaiser Kuo, Co-founder of Sinica Podcast. Free. 

Wednesday, October 10

  • "China: Current and Future Food Trends" lecture—Times TBA, held in the Lee Honors College lounge, hosted by the Lee Honors College. The talk will be led by Dr. Ann Veeck, Professor of Geography at WMU. Free.
  • CELCIS conversation circle—2 to 3 p.m. in the fourth-floor reception area of Ellsworth Hall, hosted by the Center for English Language and Culture for International Students. Join students learning English in relaxed conversation about local and social topics. Free.
  • "Propaganda and the State" Research Briefs in Global Studies—4 to 5 p.m. in the Knauss Hall Humanities Center, hosted by the Global and International Studies Program. This talk will be led by Tom Kostrzewa and Anna Popkova about China's security campaigns. Free. 
  • With/Out Borders: Toward the Future, Land Opening Ceremony—6 p.m. at the Dalton Theater at Kalamazoo College, 1200 Academy St., Kalamazoo, hosted by the Kalamazoo College Arcus Center. Join us in welcoming global land activists to Kalamazoo! Free.

Thursday, October 11

  • With/Out Borders: Toward the Future, Community Breakfast—8 a.m. at the Arcus Center for Social Justice Leadership, 205 Monroe St.., Kalamazoo, hosted by the Kalamazoo College Arcus Center. Join us in welcoming global land activists to Kalamazoo! Free.
  • CELCIS conversation circle—2 to 3 p.m. in the fourth-floor reception area of Ellsworth Hall, hosted by the Center for English Language and Culture for International Students. Join students learning English in relaxed conversation about local and social topics. Free.
  • RaceTalk Panel—5 to 7:30 p.m. in the Adrian Trimpe Multicultural Center, hosted by the Office of Diversity and Inclusion. Students will have the opportunity to listen to diverse human experiences that are similar and vastly different to their racial experience; additionally, this model provides opportunities to ask questions that students may not have felt comfortable enough to articulate about race before. Free.

Friday, October 12

  • Chinese Language Tables—noon to 1 p.m. in the Bernhard Center lower-level dining area, hosted by the Confucius Institute at WMU. Chinese Language Table's offer a free opportunity  to practice Chinese skills by easy conversations  and interesting activities. Free.

Saturday, October 13

  • Great Stories Club: The Hate U Give by Angie Thomas—4 to 6 p.m. at the Fire Historical and Cultural Arts Collaborative "Safe Space", 1249 Portage St., Kalamazoo, hosted by Kalamazoo Public Library and Truth, Racial Healing, and Transformation. Join us for discussion of identity, social justice, and community, based around the remarkable book The Hate U Give by Angie Thomas. Free. 

Monday, October 15

  • CELCIS conversation circle—2 to 3 p.m. in the Bernhard Center Global Lounge, hosted by the Center for English Language and Culture for International Students. Join students learning English in relaxed conversation about local and social topics. Free.

Tuesday, October 16

  • CELCIS conversation circle—2 to 3 p.m. in the Bernhard Center Global Lounge, hosted by the Center for English Language and Culture for International Students. Join students learning English in relaxed conversation about local and social topics. Free.

September 2018

Tuesday, September 4  

  • "Establishing a Daily Spiritual Practice" class—7 to 8:30 p.m. at the People's Church , 1758 10th St., Kalamazoo, hosted by Jewel Heart.  Learn Tibetan Buddhist meditative techniques including concentration, contemplative analysis, visualization, mantras and prayer applied daily in a structured format. Free.

Thursday, September 6  

  • International Student Activities Welcome Party—2 to 4 p.m. at the Goldsworth Valley Pond Pavilion, hosted by International Student Activities. Help welcome new international students to campus at the annual Welcome Party! Free. 
  • Mix It Up Thursday: Study Abroad—7 p.m. in the Lee Honors College Lounge, hosted by the Lee Honors College. Thursday session will be a presentation from WMU Study Abroad. Free. 

Friday, September 7  

  • Japanese conversation table—4 to 5 p.m. in the Bernhard center first-floor faculty dining room, hosted by the Soga Japan Center. Take advantage of opportunities to practice your Japanese language skills. Free. 

Saturday, September 8   

  • Fall Fab Fest—1 p.m. in the Trimpe Building Multicultural Center, hosted by the WMU Office of Lesbian, Bisexual, Gay, and Transgender Student Services. Open to all local students and community members, this event celebrates community as well as welcomes LBGT people and their allies to Kalamazoo. Free.

Sunday, September 9

  • "Power and Beauty in China's Last Dynasty: A New Approach" talk—3 p.m. in Room 2008 Richmond Center for Visual Arts, hosted by the Haenicke Institute for Global Education, the Timothy Light Center for Chinese Studies, the Confucius Institute at WMU, the Center for the Humanities, Kalamazoo Institute of Arts and the Kalamazoo Art League. The talk will be given by Dr. Yang Liu, head of the Chinese, South and Southeast Asian art department at the Minneapolis Institute of Arts. Free. 

Monday, September 10  

  • "Jade as Painting" talk—noon in the Faculty Dining Room in the Bernhard Center, hosted by the Haenicke Institute for Global Education, the Timothy Light Center for Chinese Studies, the Confucius Institute at WMU, the Center for the Humanities, Kalamazoo Institute of Arts and the Kalamazoo Art League. The talk will be given by Dr. Yang Liu, head of the Chinese, South and Southeast Asian art department at the Minneapolis Institute of Arts. Free. 
  • CELCIS conversation circle—2 to 3 p.m. in the fourth-floor reception area of Ellsworth Hall, hosted by the Center for English Language and Culture for International Students. Join students learning English in relaxed conversation about local and social topics. Free.
  • Multicultural Meet and Greet—6 to 8:30 p.m. at the Bernhard Center, Second floor, hosted by the Division of Multicultural Affairs and the College of Education and Human Development. The Multicultural Meet and Greet is an orientation that encourages sense of belonging for students of color at WMU and in the greater Kalamazoo community. Free; registration required.

Tuesday, September 11  

  • CELCIS conversation circle—2 to 3 p.m. in the fourth-floor reception area of Ellsworth Hall, hosted by the Center for English Language and Culture for International Students. Join students learning English in relaxed conversation about local and social topics. Free.
  • Ladies Sports Club—2:30 to 3:30 at the Student Recreation Center, hosted by International Student Activities. Exercise with women from around the world through yoga, body strength training, and more. Classes will meet at 2:25 at the Student Recreation help desk prior to each meeting: Free. 
  • "Establishing a Daily Spiritual Practice" class—7 to 8:30 p.m. at the People's Church , 1758 10th St., Kalamazoo, hosted by Jewel Heart.  Learn Tibetan Buddhist meditative techniques including concentration, contemplative analysis, visualization, mantras and prayer applied daily in a structured format. Free.

Wednesday, September 12  

  • Local Global Market—10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Sangren Hall, hosted by WMU International and PFC Grocery & Deli. Join us for a farmers market at Western Michigan University this September! Some of your favorite Kalamazoo Farmers Market growers, producers, and artisans will come together to bring the market experience to students and staff right on campus. Free.
  • CELCIS conversation circle—2 to 3 p.m. in the fourth-floor reception area of Ellsworth Hall, hosted by the Center for English Language and Culture for International Students. Join students learning English in relaxed conversation about local and social topics. Free.

Thursday, September 13  

  • CELCIS conversation circle—2 to 3 p.m. in the fourth-floor reception area of Ellsworth Hall, hosted by the Center for English Language and Culture for International Students. Join students learning English in relaxed conversation about local and social topics. Free.
  • "Neuroethics: Science in Society" lecture—5:30 p.m. in the WMU Homer Stryker School of Medicine, 300 Portage St., Kalamazoo, hosted by the Center for the Study of Ethics in Society. The lecture will be given by Dr. Stephanie J. Bird, former vice president for research at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Free. 
  • "Los Bandits: More than a Tex-Mex Band" UNREELED film screening—6:30 p.m. at the Kalamazoo Institute of Arts, 314 S. Park St., hosted by the KIA. The documentary tells the journey of a local Kalamazoo band, their origins in Mexico and Texas and how they brought their talents to Michigan. Adults $5; students with ID $2. 

Saturday, September 15

  • Poetry Workshop for Messages of Hope—1 to 4 p.m. at the Kalamazoo Public Library Alma Powell Branch, 1000 W Paterson St., Kalamazoo, hosted by the Kalamazoo Public Library, Gryphon Place and Kinetic Affect. This event will consist of several workshops for youth to compose poetry about overcoming challenges, struggles, and adversity. Free. 

Monday, September 17  

  • CELCIS conversation circle—2 to 3 p.m. in the fourth-floor reception area of Ellsworth Hall, hosted by the Center for English Language and Culture for International Students. Join students learning English in relaxed conversation about local and social topics. Free.
  • Poetry Workshop for Messages of Hope—5:30 to 8:30 p.m. at the Kalamazoo Public Library Central Branch, 315 S Rose St., Kalamazoo, hosted by the Kalamazoo Public Library, Gryphon Place and Kinetic Affect. This event will consist of several workshops for youth to compose poetry about overcoming challenges, struggles, and adversity. Free. 

Tuesday, September 18 

  • "Craft in America: Borders and Neighbors" ARTbreak video—noon to 1 p.m. at the Kalamazoo Institute of the Arts, 314 S Park St., Kalamazoo.  Learn about the connections between Mexico and the United States through craft. Free.
  • CELCIS conversation circle—2 to 3 p.m. in the fourth-floor reception area of Ellsworth Hall, hosted by the Center for English Language and Culture for International Students. Join students learning English in relaxed conversation about local and social topics. Free.
  • "Conspicuous by Their Invisibility" presentation—7 p.m. at the Arcus Center for Social Justice Leadership, 205 Monroe St., Kalamazoo, hosted by the Kalamazoo College Arcus Center. The presentation by Anne Dueweke will give an account of the founding years of Kalamazoo College, describe the interactions of the College's founders with Indigenous people and explain how white settlement affected the Potawatomi and Ottawa people living here. Free; registration required. 
  • "Establishing a Daily Spiritual Practice" class—7 to 8:30 p.m. at the People's Church , 1758 10th St., Kalamazoo, hosted by Jewel Heart.  Learn Tibetan Buddhist meditative techniques including concentration, contemplative analysis, visualization, mantras and prayer applied daily in a structured format. Free.

Wednesday, September 19  

  • Local Global Market—10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Sangren Hall, hosted by WMU International and PFC Grocery & Deli. Join us for a farmers market at Western Michigan University this September! Some of your favorite Kalamazoo Farmers Market growers, producers, and artisans will come together to bring the market experience to students and staff right on campus. Free.
  • CELCIS conversation circle—2 to 3 p.m. in the fourth-floor reception area of Ellsworth Hall, hosted by the Center for English Language and Culture for International Students. Join students learning English in relaxed conversation about local and social topics. Free.
  • "How Did Meat Become a Global Food?" Lyseum lecture Series—noon to 1 p.m., held in the Lee Honors College lounge, hosted by the Lee Honors College. The talk will be led by Dr. Wilson Warren, chair and professor of history at WMU. Free.

Thursday, September 20  

  • "Get the Picture: Philemona Williamson"—noon to 1 p.m. at the Kalamazoo Institute of Arts (KIA), 314 S. Park St., Kalamazoo, hosted by the KIA. Enjoy an in-depth exploration of one of our new acquisitions: Philemona Williamson's Tender Breeze, 2008, oil on linen. Adults $5; students with ID $2.
  • CELCIS conversation circle—2 to 3 p.m. in the fourth-floor reception area of Ellsworth Hall, hosted by the Center for English Language and Culture for International Students. Join students learning English in relaxed conversation about local and social topics. Free.

Friday, September 21

  • Chinese Language Tables—noon to 1 p.m. in the Bernhard Center lower-level dining area, hosted by the Confucius Institute at WMU. Chinese Language Table's offer a free opportunity  to practice Chinese skills by easy conversations  and interesting activities. Free.

Saturday, September 22  

  • Kalamazoo Reptile & Exotic Animal Show— 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the Kalamazoo County Expo Center, 2900 Lake St., Kalamazoo, hosted by the Kalamazoo Reptile & Exotic Pet Expo. Come to this monthly event to learn from pet experts about exotic pets from around the world. Adults $5; Children $2; children under six are free.
  • Audiotree Music Festival—noon to 11 p.m. at Arcadia Creek Festival Place, 145 E Water St., Kalamazoo, hosted by Audiotree Live. Audiotree Music Festival returns to Kalamazoo to showcase 20 plus new and emerging artists from all over the world. $45/ day general admission.

Sunday, September 23  

  • Audiotree Music Festival—noon to 11 p.m. at Arcadia Creek Festival Place, 145 E Water St., Kalamazoo, hosted by Audiotree Live. Audiotree Music Festival returns to Kalamazoo to showcase 20 plus new and emerging artists from all over the world. $45/ day general admission.

Monday, September 24  

  • "Inform. Empower. Prevent. Let's End Campus Sexual Assault" summit—details and full agenda TBA at  endcampussexualassault.com. Free.
  • CELCIS conversation circle—2 to 3 p.m. in the fourth-floor reception area of Ellsworth Hall, hosted by the Center for English Language and Culture for International Students. Join students learning English in relaxed conversation about local and social topics. Free.
  • RaceTalk Panel—5 to 7:30 p.m. in 1001 Wood Hall, hosted by the Office of Diversity and Inclusion. Students will have the opportunity to listen to diverse human experiences that are similar and vastly different to their racial experience; additionally, this model provides opportunities to ask questions that students may not have felt comfortable enough to articulate about race before. Free.

Tuesday, September 25  

  • "68: How Far Have We Come" special exhibit—all day Sept. 25-26 at the Richmond Center for Visual Arts, hosted by the Center for the Study of Ethics in Society. The special mobile museum exhibit will explore black history. Free. 
  • "Craft in America: Borders and Neighbors" ARTbreak video—noon to 1 p.m. at the Kalamazoo Institute of the Arts, 314 S Park St., Kalamazoo.  Learn about the connections between Mexico and the United States through craft. Free.
  • CELCIS conversation circle—2 to 3 p.m. in the fourth-floor reception area of Ellsworth Hall, hosted by the Center for English Language and Culture for International Students. Join students learning English in relaxed conversation about local and social topics. Free.
  • Ladies Sports Club—2:30 to 3:30 at the Student Recreation Center, hosted by International Student Activities. Exercise with women from around the world through yoga, body strength training, and more. Classes will meet at 2:25 at the Student Recreation help desk prior to each meeting: Free. 
  • "The Truth Hurts: Black History, Honesty and Healing the Racial Divide" talk—3:30 p.m. in room 2008 Richmond Center for the Visual Arts, hosted by the Center for the Study of Ethics in Society. The talk will be given by Khalid el-Hakim, curator of the Black History 101 Mobile Museum with a reception to follow. Free. 
  • Reading Race Book Group—6:30 to 8 p.m. at the Kalamazoo Public Library Central Branch, 315 S Rose St., Kalamazoo, hosted by the Society for History and Racial Equity and the Kalamazoo Public Library's  Anti-racism Transformation Team. This book group focuses on race and racism in American society and will be discussing "When I was Puerto Rican" by Esmeralda Santiago. Free.
  • "Unsavory Truth: How Food Companies Skew the Science of What We Eat" Lyceum Lecture series—6:30 p.m. at Chenery Auditorium, 714 S Westnedge Ave., Kalamazoo, hosted by the Lee Honors College Lyceum Lecture series. In this talk, award-winning author, Marion Nestle, reveals how the food industry manipulates nutrition science and suggests what we can do about it. Free.
  • "Establishing a Daily Spiritual Practice" class—7 to 8:30 p.m. at the People's Church , 1758 10th St., Kalamazoo, hosted by Jewel Heart.  Learn Tibetan Buddhist meditative techniques including concentration, contemplative analysis, visualization, mantras and prayer applied daily in a structured format. Free.

Wednesday, September 26  

  • Local Global Market—10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Sangren Hall, hosted by WMU International and PFC Grocery & Deli. Join us for a farmers market at Western Michigan University this September! Some of your favorite Kalamazoo Farmers Market growers, producers, and artisans will come together to bring the market experience to students and staff right on campus. Free.
  • 2018 WMU Study Abroad Fair—11 a.m. to 3 p.m. in Sangren Hall, hosted by the WMU Study Abroad. WMU Study Abroad Fair attendees get the chance to speak with WMU students who have studied and interned abroad, as well as with WMU professors who coordinate programs and courses around the globe. Free. 
  • CELCIS conversation circle—2 to 3 p.m. in the fourth-floor reception area of Ellsworth Hall, hosted by the Center for English Language and Culture for International Students. Join students learning English in relaxed conversation about local and social topics. Free.

Thursday, September 27  

  • CELCIS conversation circle—2 to 3 p.m. in the fourth-floor reception area of Ellsworth Hall, hosted by the Center for English Language and Culture for International Students. Join students learning English in relaxed conversation about local and social topics. Free.

Friday, September 28 

  • Asian Forum—8:30 a.m. to 8 p.m. at Western Michigan University, hosted by the Haenicke Institute for Global Education, the Confucius Institute at WMU, the Soga Japan Center and the Timothy Light Center for Chinese Studies. A forum for scholars at WMU and in the West Michigan area who work on Asia to share their research and to learn about ways in which to network with other faculty. Free. 
  • Truth: Angela Davis—2 p.m. in the Dalton Center Recital Hall, hosted by the University Center for the Humanities. Join us for a panel discussion with legendary activist and academic Angela Davis and artists Maria Gaspar (Chicago, IL) and Tyanna Buie (Detroit, MI). In an intimate and wide-ranging discussion, these three women will discuss the intersection of art and activism as it pertains to the crisis of mass incarceration. Free.
  • Gibbs House Potluck—6:30 to 9 p.m. at the Gibbs House, hosted by the WMU Office for Sustainability. Join the Office for Sustainability for the first Gibbs House potluck of the year! Everyone is welcome at this community event , bring a dish to pass if you can! Free. 

Saturday, September 29  

  • 2018 Taste of Jazz—8 to 11 p.m. at the Kalamazoo Institute of the Arts, 314 S Park St., Kalamazoo, hosted by the Society For Historical and Racial Equity (SHARE). Enjoy Food and Music from the Jazz Capitals of the World. General Tickets $50, and $25 for students.
  • 2018 China Festival—noon to 5 p.m. at the WMU Student Recreation Center, hosted by the Haenicke Institute for Global Education and the Confucius Institute at WMU. China Festival at WMU commemorates the traditional Chinese Moon Festival and will include events such as: dance and music performances, a badminton tournament, hands-on activities, and more. Free.

August 2018

Friday, August 3

  • Art Hop—5 to 8 p.m. in Downtown Kalamazoo, hosted by the Arts Council of Greater Kalamazoo. An evening of art exhibits and events held on the first Friday of every month that’s fun, interactive, and a great way to explore our downtown. Free and open to the public.

Saturday, August 4

  • Reptile Weekend 2018—9 a.m. to 5 p.m. at Binder Park Zoo, 7400 Division Drive, Battle Creek, hosted by Binder Park Zoo.  One of Michigan’s largest reptile events, Reptile Weekend encompasses a full weekend of fun, entertainment, and hands-on encounters with over 100 different reptiles and amphibians from around the world. Regular admission required. 

Sunday, August 5

  • Reptile Weekend 2018—9 a.m. to 5 p.m. at Binder Park Zoo, 7400 Division Drive, Battle Creek, hosted by Binder Park Zoo.  One of Michigan’s largest reptile events, Reptile Weekend encompasses a full weekend of fun, entertainment, and hands-on encounters with over 100 different reptiles and amphibians from around the world. Regular admission required. 

Monday, August 6

  • Jennifer Pharr Davis, The Pursuit of Endurance—6:30 to 8 p.m. at the Kalamazoo Public Library Central Branch, 315 S Rose St., Kalamazoo, hosted by the Kalamazoo Public Library. Listen to Jennifer Pharr Davis, a hiker, author, and speaker who has covered over 14,000 miles of long-distance trails on six different continents, discuss her new book. Free and open to the public.

Wednesday, August 8

  • Global Art—4 to 5 p.m. at the Kalamazoo Public Library Alma Powell Branch, 1000 W Paterson St., Kalamazoo, hosted by the Kalamazoo Public Library. Explore history, geography, language, and culture by creating art inspired from around the world. Free and open to the public.

Friday, August 17 

  • 10th International Conference on African Development—in 1920 Sangren Hall, hosted by the Center of African Development Policy Research. This biennial conference will invite both past participants and new scholarsto discuss the state of African economies in the 21st century. Free and open to the public.

Saturday, August 18  

  • 10th International Conference on African Development—in 1920 Sangren Hall, hosted by the Center of African Development Policy Research. This biennial conference will invite both past participants and new scholarsto discuss the state of African economies in the 21st century. Free and open to the public.
  • Learn to Speak Mandarin Chinese—2 to 3 p.m. at the Kalamazoo Public Library Central Branch, 315 S Rose St., Kalamazoo, hosted by the Kalamazoo Public Library. Come to this introductory program and receive a free workbook to help you learn some basic words in Mandarin Chinese. Registration required; free. 

Monday, August 20  

  • Australian Didgeridoo workshop—2 to 3 p.m. at the Kalamazoo Public Library Oshtemo Branch Community Room, 7265 W Main St., Kalamazoo, hosted by the Kalamazoo Public Library. Explore Australian Aboriginal history, art, culture and music, then create your own Didgeridoo instrument and learn how to play with award-winning Australian singer & songwriter Peter D. Harper. Registration required; free.

Tuesday, August 21  

  • Global Art—4 to 5 p.m. at the Kalamazoo Public Library Eastwood Branch, 1112 Gayle Ave., Kalamazoo, hosted by the Kalamazoo Public Library. Explore history, geography, language, and culture by creating art inspired from around the world. Free and open to the public. 
  • Meg Tang Jewelry—4:30 to 5:30 p.m. at the Kalamazoo Public Library Central Branch, 315 S Rose St., Kalamazoo, hosted by the Kalamazoo Public Library. Local jewelry artist, Meg Tang, will help you craft a one-of-a-kind piece using found items, wire, and more! Supplies provided. Registration Required.

Wednesday, August 22  

  • Cultivating an Inclusive Work Environment—9:15 to 11:45 p.m. at the Kalamazoo Public Library Central Branch, 315 S Rose St., Kalamazoo, hosted by the Kalamazoo Public Library.  This workshop will assist you in crafting a work environment that is inclusive for your current staff, volunteers and those you wish to attract. Registration is free. 

Saturday, August 25  

  • Kalamazoo Scottish Festival—9 a.m. to 5 p.m. at Flesher Field, 3664 S Ninth St., Kalamazoo, hosted by the Kalamazoo Scottish Festival Association. Join the celebration of the 26th annual Scottish Festival with face painters, country dancing, the Kirking of the Tartan ceremony, Clan Tents, Harpers, Weavers and more. Free and open to the public.

July 2018

Friday, July 6

  • Art Hop—5 to 8 p.m. in Downtown Kalamazoo, hosted by the Arts Council of Greater Kalamazoo. An evening of art exhibits and events held on the first Friday of every month that’s fun, interactive, and a great way to explore our downtown. Free and open to the public.

Sunday, July 8

  • Zion Lion Reggae Band at Oshtemo's Music in the Park—6 to 7 p.m. at Flesher Field, 3664 S Ninth St., Kalamazoo, hosted by Zion Lion. Back by popular demand, Zion Lion Reggae Band will perform reggae, African zouk, mucosa, zoukous and Afro-Latin influenced songs.  Hands-on art tent available for kids during the concert. Free and open to the public.

Monday, July 9

  • Magical Africa—11 a.m. to noon at the Kalamazoo Public Library, Oshtemo Branch Community Room, 7265 W Main St., Kalamazoo, hosted by the Kalamazoo Public Library. Discover the wonder of Africa's rich and diverse cultures through the use of storytelling, puppetry and magic. Registration required; free.
  • Magical Africa—2 to 3 p.m. at the Kalamazoo Public Library, Central Branch Van Deusen Room, 315 S Rose St., Kalamazoo, hosted by the Kalamazoo Public Library. Discover the wonder of Africa's rich and diverse cultures through the use of storytelling, puppetry and magic. Registration required; free.

Tuesday, July 10

  • "Pilchuck, A Dance With Fire" Artbreak Video—noon to 1 p.m. at the Kalamazoo Institute of Arts, 314 S Park St., Kalamazoo, hosted by the Kalamazoo Institute of Arts. Through firsthand accounts, this film looks back at the people and events that mark over forty years of Pilchuck's history. Free and open to the public. 

Wednesday, July 11

  • Global Art—4 to 5 p.m. at the Kalamazoo Public Library Washington Square Branch Community Room, 1244 Portage St., Kalamazoo, hosted by the Kalamazoo Public Library. Explore history, geography, language, and culture by creating art inspired from around the world. Free and open to the public.

Friday, July 13

  • Movies in the Park: Coco—9 p.m. at the Celery Flats Historical Area, 7328 Garden Lane, Portage, hosted by the city of Portage. Come and watch "Coco", the story of Miguel, who dreams of becoming an accomplished musician despite his family's generations-old ban on music. Desperate to prove his talent, Miguel finds himself in the stunning and colorful Land of the Dead. Free and open to the public.

Saturday, July 14

  • Global Art—2 to 3 p.m. at LaCrone Park, 535 W Paterson St., Kalamazoo, hosted by the Kalamazoo Public Library. Explore history, geography, language, and culture by creating art inspired from around the world. Free and open to the public.

Friday, July 20

  • Drum Beats—2 to 3 p.m. at the Kalamazoo Public Library Alma Powell Branch, 1000 W Paterson St., Kalamazoo, hosted by the Kalamazoo Public Library. Experience an engaging and memorable introduction to West African musical culture at this hands-on drumming workshop. Registration required; free.

Saturday, July 21

  • 45th Annual Richland Art Fair—9 a.m. to 4 p.m. at Richland Village Square, downtown corner of M-89 and M-43, hosted by Gull Lake Area Community Volunteers. Up to 100 artists from all over Michigan and beyond exhibit in beautiful Richland Village Square Park. Free and open to the public.  

Monday, July 23

  • Life Cycle presents: A Tea Program—6 to 7 p.m. at the Kalamazoo Public Library Eastwood Branch Community Room, 1112 Gayle Ave., Kalamazoo, hosted by the Kalamazoo Public Library. Come, join Tony from Life Cycles at Eastwood to sample, and learn about Organic Asian teas. Free and open to the public. 

Tuesday, July 24

  • Urban Fiction Book Discussion—6 to 7 p.m. at the Kalamazoo Public Library Alma Powell Branch, 1000 W Paterson St., Kalamazoo, hosted by the Kalamazoo Public Library.  The book discussion group will discuss August Snow written by Stephen Mack Jones. Free and open to the public. 
  • Reading Race Book Group—6:30 to 7:30 p.m. in the Kalamazoo Public Library Oshtemo Branch Community Room, 7265 W Main St., Kalamazoo, hosted by the Society for History and Racial Equity and KPL's Antiracism Transformation team. Book topics focus on race and racism in American society. Free and open to the public.

Friday, July 27

  • Global Art—3 to 4 p.m. at the Kalamazoo Public Library Central Branch, 315 S Rose St., Kalamazoo, hosted by the Kalamazoo Public Library. Explore history, geography, language, and culture by creating art inspired from around the world. Free and open to the public.

Saturday, July 28

  • Ramona Park Luau—3 to 9 p.m. at Ramona Park, 8600 S Sprinkle Road, Portage, hosted by the City of Portage. Enjoy carnival games, inflatables, magic shows, balloon animals, music by a local DJ, Island Dancers with a fire show, a watermelon eating contest, and a limbo contest! Food truck concessions will be available for purchase. Free and open to the public. 

Sunday, July 29

  • Historical tours and Speaker Series—2 p.m. at the Celery Flats, 7335 Garden Lane, Portage. Hear fascinating stories about the trials and tribulations of the boys from Kalamazoo County serving in the 13th Michigan Infantry during the Civil War. Free and open to the public.

Monday, July 30

  • Meg Tang Jewelry—4:30 to 5:30 p.m. at the Kalamazoo Public Library Central Branch, 315 S Rose St., Kalamazoo, hosted by the Kalamazoo Public Library. Local jewelry artist, Meg Tang, will help you craft a one-of-a-kind piece using found items, wire, and more! Supplies provided. Registration Required. 

Tuesday, July 31

  • Mystery Writer Stephen Mack Jones visits Kalamazoo—6 to 7 p.m. at the Kalamazoo Public Library Alma Powell Branch, 1000 W Paterson St., Kalamazoo, hosted by the Kalamazoo Public Library. Stephen Mack Jones, poet and writer, will join us at the Alma Powell Branch and share his story and tidbits from his book August Snow. Free and open to the public.

June 2018

Friday, June 1

  • 2018 KIA Arts Fair—3 to 8 p.m. in Bronson Park, 200 W South St., Kalamazoo, hosted by the Kalamazoo Institute of Arts. Nearly 190 jury-selected artists from across the country will offer beautiful artwork in Bronson Park. Free and open to the public. 
  • Art Hop—5 to 8 p.m. in Downtown Kalamazoo, hosted by the Arts Council of Greater Kalamazoo. An evening of art exhibits and events held on the first Friday of every month that’s fun, interactive, and a great way to explore our downtown. Free and open to the public.
  • History Untold: The Famine in the Ukraine-- the Ukrainian Holodomor of 1933—5:30 to 7 p.m. at the Kalamazoo Public Library Central Branch, 315 S Rose St., Kalamazoo, hosted by the Kalamazoo Public Library. Andrew Koehler, music director of the Kalamazoo Philharmonia, Associate Professor of Music and Chair of the Kalamazoo College Music Department will lead a discussion and lecture about the untold tragedy: the Ukrainian Holodomor of 1933, when millions of Ukrainians perished needlessly on Stalin’s orders. Free; Registration required.

Saturday, June 2

  • 2018 KIA Arts Fair—9 a.m. to 5 p.m. in Bronson Park, 200 W South St., Kalamazoo, hosted by the Kalamazoo Institute of Arts. Nearly 190 jury-selected artists from across the country will offer beautiful artwork in Bronson Park. Free and open to the public. 

Monday, June 4

  • CELCIS conversation circle—2 to 3 p.m. in the fourth-floor reception area of Ellsworth Hall, hosted by the Center for English Language and Culture for International Students. Join students learning English in relaxed conversation about local and social topics. Free and open to the public.
  • Afro-Modern dance class—5:30 to 6:30 p.m. at Rootead Enrichment Center, 1501 Fulford St., Kalamazoo, hosted by Rootead. Work with an instructor to learn the basics of Afro-Modern dance. $10 per class. 
  • Argentine Tango—6:30 to 7:30 p.m. at the Kalamazoo Public Library Oshtemo Branch, 7265 W Main St., Kalamazoo, hosted by the Kalamazoo Public Library. "Kick off" Summer reading with Art Downey from Kalamazoo DanceSport. We'll go over the basics of the Argentine Tango while enjoying good company. Free; Registration required.

Tuesday, June 5

  • CELCIS conversation circle—2 to 3 p.m. in the fourth-floor reception area of Ellsworth Hall, hosted by the Center for English Language and Culture for International Students. Join students learning English in relaxed conversation about local and social topics. Free and open to the public.
  • "Establishing a Daily Spiritual Practice" class—7 to 8:30 p.m. at The People's Church, 1758 N 10th St., Kalamazoo, hosted by Jewel Heart. Learn Tibetan Buddhist meditative techniques including concentration, contemplative analysis, visualization, mantras and prayer applied daily in a structured format. Free and open to the public.

Saturday, June 9

  • Tai Chi class—2:15 to 3:15 p.m. at the Rootead Enrichment Center, 1501 Fulford St., Kalamazoo, hosted by Rootead. Work with an instructor to learn Tai Chi in a class for all ages. $10 per class. 

Monday, June 11

  • CELCIS conversation circle—2 to 3 p.m. in the fourth-floor reception area of Ellsworth Hall, hosted by the Center for English Language and Culture for International Students. Join students learning English in relaxed conversation about local and social topics. Free and open to the public.
  • Afro-Modern dance class—5:30 to 6:30 p.m. at Rootead Enrichment Center, 1501 Fulford St., Kalamazoo, hosted by Rootead. Work with an instructor to learn the basics of Afro-Modern dance. $10 per class. 

Tuesday, June 12

  • CELCIS conversation circle—2 to 3 p.m. in the fourth-floor reception area of Ellsworth Hall, hosted by the Center for English Language and Culture for International Students. Join students learning English in relaxed conversation about local and social topics. Free and open to the public.
  • Cultivating Community through Cooking—5:30 p.m. at the Kalamazoo College Arcus Center, 205 Monrow St., Kalamazoo, hosted by the Refugee Outreach Collective. Classes are taught by individuals and families who have recently made Kalamazoo their home. Each course works to build a space for conversation, learn, and of course, eat. Free and open to the public.
  • "Establishing a Daily Spiritual Practice" class—7 to 8:30 p.m. at The People's Church, 1758 N 10th St., Kalamazoo, hosted by Jewel Heart. Learn Tibetan Buddhist meditative techniques including concentration, contemplative analysis, visualization, mantras and prayer applied daily in a structured format. Free and open to the public.

Friday, June 15

  • Pride Night at the Kalamazoo Growlers—6 to 9:30 p.m. at Homer Stryker Field, 251 Mills St., Kalamazoo, hosted by the Kalamazoo Growlers and OutFront Kalamazoo. We are hosting a Tailgate Party that includes all-inclusive food/drink and 3 beers. Use the code "kzoopride", proceeds will benefit OutFront Kalamazoo. The first 100 people through the gates will receive rainbow swag from Bell's Brewery, and Sparkleberry will be on tap! Stick around for fireworks after the game! Tickets are $17. 

Saturday, June 16

  • Tai Chi class—2:15 to 3:15 p.m. at the Rootead Enrichment Center, 1501 Fulford St., Kalamazoo, hosted by Rootead. Work with an instructor to learn Tai Chi in a class for all ages. $10 per class. 

Sunday, June 17

  • Historical Tours and Speaker Series—2 p.m. at the Celery Flats, 7335 Garden Lane, Portage. You may have heard of national leaders such as Susan B. Anthony advocating for national woman suffrage. Suffrage activities existed on the local and state level as well. Learn about these local leaders in the suffrage movement, which operated out of West Michigan. Free and open to the public.

Monday, June 18

  • CELCIS conversation circle—2 to 3 p.m. in the fourth-floor reception area of Ellsworth Hall, hosted by the Center for English Language and Culture for International Students. Join students learning English in relaxed conversation about local and social topics. Free and open to the public.
  • Afro-Modern dance class—5:30 to 6:30 p.m. at Rootead Enrichment Center, 1501 Fulford St., Kalamazoo, hosted by Rootead. Work with an instructor to learn the basics of Afro-Modern dance. $10 per class. 
  • "Let's talk about Puerto Rico" discussion—6:30 to 7:30 p.m. at the Kalamazoo Public Library Oshtemo Branch, 7265 W Main St., Kalamazoo, hosted by the Kalamazoo Public Library. Dr. Adriana Garriga-López, Department Chair and Associate Professor of Anthropology at Kalamazoo College, will talk about the history of Puerto Rico and the situation on the island today, nearly nine months after Hurricane Maria. Free and open to the public.

Tuesday, June 19

  • CELCIS conversation circle—2 to 3 p.m. in the fourth-floor reception area of Ellsworth Hall, hosted by the Center for English Language and Culture for International Students. Join students learning English in relaxed conversation about local and social topics. Free and open to the public.
  • "Establishing a Daily Spiritual Practice" class—7 to 8:30 p.m. at The People's Church, 1758 N 10th St., Kalamazoo, hosted by Jewel Heart. Learn Tibetan Buddhist meditative techniques including concentration, contemplative analysis, visualization, mantras and prayer applied daily in a structured format. Free and open to the public.

Saturday, June 23

  • Tai Chi class—2:15 to 3:15 p.m. at the Rootead Enrichment Center, 1501 Fulford St., Kalamazoo, hosted by Rootead. Work with an instructor to learn Tai Chi in a class for all ages. $10 per class. 

Sunday, June 24

  • "Global Glass" Sunday tour—2 to 3 p.m. at the Kalamazoo Institute of Arts, 314 S Park St., Kalamazoo, hosted by the KIA. The history of glass is an international story of industrial, scientific, and artistic contributions forging a magnificent diversity of achievements both functional and sculptural. Free and open to the public.

Monday, June 25

  • CELCIS conversation circle—2 to 3 p.m. in the fourth-floor reception area of Ellsworth Hall, hosted by the Center for English Language and Culture for International Students. Join students learning English in relaxed conversation about local and social topics. Free and open to the public.
  • Afro-Modern dance class—5:30 to 6:30 p.m. at Rootead Enrichment Center, 1501 Fulford St., Kalamazoo, hosted by Rootead. Work with an instructor to learn the basics of Afro-Modern dance. $10 per class. 

Tuesday, June 26

  • CELCIS conversation circle—2 to 3 p.m. in the fourth-floor reception area of Ellsworth Hall, hosted by the Center for English Language and Culture for International Students. Join students learning English in relaxed conversation about local and social topics. Free and open to the public.
  • "Establishing a Daily Spiritual Practice" class—7 to 8:30 p.m. at The People's Church, 1758 N 10th St., Kalamazoo, hosted by Jewel Heart. Learn Tibetan Buddhist meditative techniques including concentration, contemplative analysis, visualization, mantras and prayer applied daily in a structured format. Free and open to the public.

Thursday, June 28

  • Global Glass, A Survey of Form and Function, opening reception—5 to 8 p.m. at the Kalamazoo Institute of Arts, 314 S Park St., Kalamazoo, hosted by the KIA. Join us for an evening of beauty and community. Visit our new exhibition, Global Glass: A Survey of Form and Function (June 23 - October 14, 2018) and enjoy refreshments, conversation, and a curator's talk by Don Desmett. Free and open to the public. 

Saturday, June 30

  • Tai Chi class—2:15 to 3:15 p.m. at the Rootead Enrichment Center, 1501 Fulford St., Kalamazoo, hosted by Rootead. Work with an instructor to learn Tai Chi in a class for all ages. $10 per class. 

MAy 2018

Tuesday, May 1

  • "Establishing a Daily Spiritual Practice" class—7 to 8:30 p.m. at The People's Church, 1758 N 10th St., Kalamazoo, hosted by Jewel Heart. Learn Tibetan Buddhist meditative techniques including concentration, contemplative analysis, visualization, mantras and prayer applied daily in a structured format. Free and open to the public.

Wednesday, May 2

  • Healthy Living Conference—8:15 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the Health and Human Services Building, hosted by the Osher Lifelong Learning Institute. Half-day conference with keynote speaker Dr. Hal Jenson, dean of the WMU Homer Stryker M.D. School of Medicine, who will bring participants up-do-date on the practice of modern medicine. Registration is $30. 

Saturday, May 5

  • Spanish Harlem Orchestra—8 p.m. at Chenery Auditorium, 714 S Westnedge Ave, Kalamazoo, hosted by the Gilmore Keyboard Festival. Two-time Grammy Award-winning Salsa and Latin Jazz band. Tickets are $65, $45, and $25 reserved seating. 

Sunday, May 6

  • Middle Eastern Drumming—1 to 3 p.m. at Bellydance Kalamazoo, 1350 Portage Road, hosted by Bellydance Kalamazoo. This workshop is focused on teaching dancers to integrate their understanding of middle eastern rhythms utilizing the drum. Registration is $55. 

Tuesday, May 8

  • "Establishing a Daily Spiritual Practice" class—7 to 8:30 p.m. at The People's Church, 1758 N 10th St., Kalamazoo, hosted by Jewel Heart. Learn Tibetan Buddhist meditative techniques including concentration, contemplative analysis, visualization, mantras and prayer applied daily in a structured format. Free and open to the public.

Wednesday, May 9

  • "Rome Wasn't Built in a Day" talk—2 p.m. in the Heining Emeriti Lounge in West Walwood Hall, hosted by the Emeriti Council. The talk will be given by Dr. Helenan Robin, professor emerita of political science at WMU. Free and open to the public. 
  • Igor Levit, 2018 Gilmore Artist concert—2 p.m. at Stetson Chapel, 1200 Academy St. Kalamazoo, hosted by the Gilmore Keyboard Festival. Igor Levit, the 2018 Gilmore Artist Recipient, makes his debut Festival recital. Pre-concert talk at 1 p.m. led by Zaide Pixley. Tickets are $30; open to the public. 

Thursday, May 10

  • 13th Annual National Children's Mental Health Awareness Day Carnival— 4 to 7 p.m. at the Kalamazoo County Expo Center, 2900 Lake St., Kalamazoo, hosted by Kalamazoo County. This event celebrates children's mental health and helps to reduce the stigma of receiving mental health services for youth and families in a free, fun, and interactive atmosphere. Free and open to the public. 
  • "Red Terror in Kalamazoo: An Incident in the Shakespeare Strike of 1948" lecture—7 to 8:30 p.m. in the Kalamazoo Public Library Central Branch VanDeusen Room, 315 S Rose St., Kalamazoo, hosted by the Kalamazoo Public Library. Local historian Tom Dietz will recount the story of the 1948 Shakespeare Company workers strike. Free and open to the public. 

Tuesday, May 15

  • "Establishing a Daily Spiritual Practice" class—7 to 8:30 p.m. at The People's Church, 1758 N 10th St., Kalamazoo, hosted by Jewel Heart. Learn Tibetan Buddhist meditative techniques including concentration, contemplative analysis, visualization, mantras and prayer applied daily in a structured format. Free and open to the public.

Friday, May 18

  • "WMU: Higher Education at the Crossroads" speaker series—7:30 a.m. in the Fetzer Center room 1035, hosted by the Haworth College of Business. The talk will be given by President Edward Montgomery as the final speaker for this season's Mercantile Bank of Michigan Breakfast Speaker Series. Registration required; free. 
  • Stulberg International String Competition—9 a.m. to 4 p.m. in the Dalton Center Recital Hall, hosted by the Stulberg International String Competition. Twelve semifinalists from around the world compete for a chance to win cash prizes and performance opportunities. Daytime semifinals free; evening finals $20/adults and $5/ students. 

Saturday, May 19

  • Seita Scholars Foster Care Awareness walk—9 to 11 a.m. at Kanley Track, hosted by the Seita Scholars Program. Join the Seita Scholars in their third annual Foster Care Awareness Walk; walk ten laps to celebrate the 10-year anniversary of the Seita Scholars Program. Registration $15 for adults, $10 for students and free for children 12 and under. 

Sunday, May 20

  • "Vibrant Bounty: Chinese Folk Art from the Shaanxi Region" public tour—2 to 3 p.m. at the Kalamazoo Institute of Arts Galleries, 315 S Park St., Kalamazoo, hosted by the Kalamazoo Institute of Arts. Tour the beautiful Vibrant Bounty: Chinese Folk Art from the Shaanxi Region with a knowledgeable docent. Free and open to the public. 

Monday, May 21

  • CELCIS conversation circle—2 to 3 p.m. in the fourth-floor reception area of Ellsworth Hall, hosted by the Center for English Language and Culture for International Students. Join students learning English in relaxed conversation about local and social topics. Free and open to the public.
  • "Michigan, My Michigan: A History of the State- British Control to Territorial Michigan" discussion—7 to 8:30 p.m. at the Kalamazoo Public Library Van Deusen Room, 315 S Rose St., Kalamazoo, hosted by the Kalamazoo Public Library. Join Lynn Houghton for a multi-session journey looking at all aspects of Michigan's growth. Free and open to the public.

Tuesday, May 22

  • CELCIS conversation circle—2 to 3 p.m. in the fourth-floor reception area of Ellsworth Hall, hosted by the Center for English Language and Culture for International Students. Join students learning English in relaxed conversation about local and social topics. Free and open to the public.
  • Reading Race Book Group—6:30 to 8 p.m. at the Kalamazoo Public Library Alma Powell Branch Barnabee Gallery, 1000 W Paterson St., Kalamazoo, hosted by the Kalamazoo Public Library. This book group, co-sponsored by the Society for History and Racial Equity (SHARE) and KPL’s Anti-racism Transformation Team, focuses on race and racism in American society. Free and open to the public. 

Monday, May 28

  • CELCIS conversation circle—2 to 3 p.m. in the fourth-floor reception area of Ellsworth Hall, hosted by the Center for English Language and Culture for International Students. Join students learning English in relaxed conversation about local and social topics. Free and open to the public.

Tuesday, May 29

  • CELCIS conversation circle—2 to 3 p.m. in the fourth-floor reception area of Ellsworth Hall, hosted by the Center for English Language and Culture for International Students. Join students learning English in relaxed conversation about local and social topics. Free and open to the public.

april 2018

Monday, April 2

  • African American ad African Studies open house—11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. at 1115 Moore Hall, hosted by the College of Arts and Sciences. Learn about the reinstated major and minor in African American and African studies. Free and open to the public.
  • CELCIS conversation circle—2 to 3 p.m. in the fourth-floor reception area of Ellsworth Hall, hosted by the Center for English Language and Culture for International Students. Join students learning English in relaxed conversation about local and social topics. Free and open to the public.
  • "Education Equity: From the 'Kalamazoo Case' to the 'Kalamazoo Promise' and Beyond" lecture—6 p.m. in 204 Bernhard Center, hosted by the Center for the Study of Ethics in Society. Join this lecture series discussion with panelists Jim Robb, general counsel and associate dean of alumni and public relations, WMU Cooley Law School; Cyekeia Lee, director of outreach and partnerships, Kalamazoo Promise; Michael Evans, executive director, Kalamazoo Literacy Council; and Sandra Standish, executive director, KC Ready 4s. Free and open to the public.
  • Introduction to Arabic Language—6:30 to 7:30 p.m. at the Kalamazoo Public Library Oshtemo Branch Community Room, 7265 W Main St., Kalamazoo, hosted by the Kalamazoo Public Library. This six-week course is a basic introduction to the Arabic language for beginners. Registration begins March 3; all materials are provided; registration is limited.  

Tuesday, April 3

  • "International Research: Opportunities and Challenges," Discover Discovery research workshop—12:30 to 1:45 at the Fetzer Center, hosted by Research at WMU. This session will provide an overview of some of the opportunities that are available for international partnerships and conducting research. Registration is required by the Friday prior to each workshop.
  • CELCIS conversation circle—2 to 3 p.m. in the Bernhard Center Bronco Global Lounge, hosted by the Center for English Language and Culture for International Students. Join students learning English in relaxed conversation about local and social topics. Free and open to the public.

Wednesday, April 4

  • "Healthy Relationships" Lyceum Lecture Series—noon in the Lee Honors College lounge, hosted by the Lee Honors College. Talk given by Dr Gary Bischof, dean of the Lee Honors College, and Dr. Jou-Chen Chen, family and consumer services. Free and open to the public. 
  • CELCIS conversation circle—2 to 3 p.m. in the fourth-floor reception area of Ellsworth Hall, hosted by the Center for English Language and Culture for International Students. Join students learning English in relaxed conversation about local and social topics. Free and open to the public.
  • "Interviews in Fieldwork" research briefing in global studies—3 to 4 p.m. in 3025 Brown Hall, hosted by the global and International Studies Program. This talk features Chien-Juh Gu and Greg Veeck. Free and open to the public. 
  • Meg Tang Jewelry—4:30 to 5:30 p.m. at the Kalamazoo Public Library Alma Powell Branch Douglass Community Center, 1000 W Paterson St. Kalamazoo, hosted by the Kalamazoo Public Library. Make jewelry using found items, wire, and more with local artist Meg Tang. Registration is free. 

Thursday, April 5

  • "What About the Children? Standing in the Gap for Children with Incarcerated Family Members" discussion— 11 a.m. in 4010 Health and Human Services Building on WMU's East Campus, hosted by the University-Community Empowerment Center. Discussion will be led by Dr. Dana Cunningham, licensed clinical psychologist and author. Free and open the the public. 
  • CELCIS conversation circle (women only)—2 to 3 p.m. in the Bernhard Center Bronco Global Lounge, hosted by the Center for English Language and Culture for International Students. Join students learning English in relaxed conversation about local and social topics. Free and open to the public.
  • "Displacement as Opportunity" lecture series—4 to 5 p.m. at 1910 Sangren Hall, hosted by the Timothy Light Center for Chinese Studies. In his lecture, Professor Xuefei Jin (Ha Jin) plans to give a short talk in combination with some poetry reading in both English and Chinese. Free and open to the public. 
  • "Nuclear Weapons & Toxic Masculinity: Eco-Feminist Engagements in the Age of #Metoo" scholarly speaker series—4 to 5:30 p.m. in 2500 Knauss Hall, hosted by the University Center for the Humanities. This talk will be given by Dr. Heidi Hutner, a teacher and writer specializing in environmental justice, ecofeminism, and sustainability. Free and open to the public; reception to follow. 
  • "What About the Children? Standing in the Gap for Children with Incarcerated Family Members" discussion— 6 p.m. at Kalamazoo County Juvenile Home, 1424 Gull Road, Kalamazoo, hosted by the University-Community Empowerment Center. Discussion will be led by Dr. Dana Cunningham, licensed clinical psychologist and author. Free and open the the public. 

Friday, April 6

  • "Cuba: Culture and Society" lecture—11 a.m. to noon at the Fountains at Bronson Place, 1700 Bronson Way, Kalamazoo, hosted by the Osher Lifelong Learning Institute. The lecture will be given by Dr. Kristina Wirtz, professor of Spanish at WMU. Registration is $30 for lecture series; open to the public. 
  • "The Future of Employment: How Susceptible Are Jobs to Computerization?" book club discussion—5:30 p.m. at the Water Street Coffee Joint, 135 E Water St., Kalamazoo, hosted by the ethics center. Discuss a report that examines the impact of technology on U.S. labor markets with Oxford University professors Carl B. Frey and Michael A Osborne. All materials are provided; must register by March 30. 

Saturday, April 7

  • Exhibition Opens: Vibrant Bounty, Chinese Folk Art—11 a.m. at the Kalamazoo Institute of Arts, 314 S Park St., Kalamazoo, hosted by the Kalamazoo Institute of Arts. Journey through the Shaanxi Province through folk paintings and artifacts of rural China. Free and open to the public.

Monday, April 9

  • CELCIS conversation circle—2 to 3 p.m. in the fourth-floor reception area of Ellsworth Hall, hosted by the Center for English Language and Culture for International Students. Join students learning English in relaxed conversation about local and social topics. Free and open to the public.
  • "Climax-Type Porphyry Molybdenum Deposits: An Example of how Detailed Investigations can Advance Geological Understandings" sciences seminar—4 to 5 p.m. in 1118 Rood Hall, hosted by the Department of Geological and Environmental Sciences. The talk will be given by Dr. Roger C. Steininger, chief sciences officer at NuLegacy Gold Corporation. Free and open to the public. 
  • "Classified: Who in the World is Merze Tate?" discussion—6 to 7:30 p.m. at the Kalamazoo Public Library Eastwood Branch Community Room, 1112 Gayle Ave., Kalamazoo, hosted by the Kalamazoo Public Library. Come hear Sonya Bernard- Hollins as she walks us through her new book and tells us about Merze Tate, the first African American graduate of Western Michigan Teachers College. Free and open to the public.

Tuesday, April 10

  • "Salsa, Soul and Spirit in a Multicultural Age" diversity program—9:30 a.m. and 1:30 p.m. at Chenery Auditorium, 714 S Westnedge Ave., Kalamazoo, hosted by Kalamazoo County. Juana Bordas, president of Mestiza Leadership International, is the featured speaker for Kalamazoo County's 20th annual Respecting Differences program, which seeks to illustrate the richness and wisdom that diversity brings to the workplace. 
  • "Photographing Potawatomi Regalia" artbreak talk—noon to 1 p.m. at the Kalamazoo Institute of Arts, 314 S Park St., Kalamazoo, hosted by the Kalamazoo Institute of Arts. Photographer Sharon Hoogstraten speaks about her photographic portraits of Potawatomi Indians, with special focus on the designs and meanings of their regalia. Free and open to the public.  
  • International Ladies Sports Club—2 to 3 p.m. at the Student Recreation Center, hosted by International Student Activities. Bond with women from all over the world through sports and exercise. Free and open to all women in the community. 
  • CELCIS conversation circle—2 to 3 p.m. in the Bernhard Center Bronco Global Lounge, hosted by the Center for English Language and Culture for International Students. Join students learning English in relaxed conversation about local and social topics. Free and open to the public.

Wednesday, April 11

  • "Grit, Resiliency and Self-Care" lecture—noon in the Lee Honors College lounge, hosted by the Lee Honors College. Lecture given by Brian Fuller, interim director of WMU Counseling Services. Free and open to the public.
  • CELCIS conversation circle—2 to 3 p.m. in the fourth-floor reception area of Ellsworth Hall, hosted by the Center for English Language and Culture for International Students. Join students learning English in relaxed conversation about local and social topics. Free and open to the public.
  • "Environmental Justice" talk—6 to 8 p.m. in the Trimpe Building Multicultural Center, hosted by the Office of Diversity and Inclusion. The talk will be given by Laura Donders, intern coordinator in the Office for Sustainability. Free and open to the public. 
  • Comtemporary Religious Art in Ethiopia art league—6:30 p.m. at the Kalamazoo Institute of Arts, 314 S Park St., Kalamazoo, hosted by the KIA. Learn about Ethiopian religious art from Dr. Raymond Silverman, the founding Director of the University of Michigan's Museum Studies Program. Open to the public; $12 for the general public, $10 for KIA members, and $3 for students. 
  • "America Divided" film festival—7 to 9 p.m. at the Bernhard Center North Ballroom, hosted by the Walker Institute for the Study of Race and Ethnic Relations, FemiNOW, FOCUS Kalamazoo, and Sincerely From. Attend a film festival focusing on inequality in everyday lives with "A House Divided" a movie about New York City's affordability crisis. Doors open at 6:30 p.m; Free and open to the public. 

Thursday, April 12

  • CELCIS conversation circle (women only)—2 to 3 p.m. in the Bernhard Center Bronco Global Lounge, hosted by the Center for English Language and Culture for International Students. Join students learning English in relaxed conversation about local and social topics. Free and open to the public.
  • Public input session—4 to 6 p.m. in the Bernhard Center lobby. Input neededfor WMU's proposed new student center in the South Neighborhood. Free and open to the public. 
  • "Inequality, Citizenship and the Promise of Education talk—7 p.m. in 2452 Knauss Hall, hosted by the University Center for the Humanities. The talk will be given by Daniella Allen, professor of government and in the Graduate School of Education at Harvard University and director of the Edmond J. Safra Center for Ethics. Free and open to the public. 
  • Public input session—6 to 8 p.m. in the Bernhard Center lobby. Input neededfor WMU's proposed new student center in the South Neighborhood. Free and open to the public. 

Saturday, April 14

  • Kalamazoo Color Run 5k—10 a.m. at Arcadia Creek Festival Place, 145 E Water St., Kalamazoo, hosted by the Kalamazoo Color Run.  Bringing people together and make the world a happier, healthier place by creating an experience that’s more about the memories you make than your mile per minute, we made running feel accessible to a broader demographic. Registration costs may very. 
  • Spring Choreographer Showcase—6:30 to 7:30 p.m. at the Rootead Enrichment Center, 1501 Fulford St., Kalamazoo, hosted by Rootead. Witness movement arts from Kalamazoo and surrounding communities. Tickets are $8-$10; open to the public. 

Monday, April 16

  • "Michigan, My Michigan: A History of the State- British Control to Territorial Michigan" discussion—7 to 8:30 p.m. at the Kalamazoo Public Library Van Deusen Room, 315 S Rose St., Kalamazoo, hosted by the Kalamazoo Public Library. Join Lynn Houghton for a multi-session journey looking at all aspects of Michigan's growth. Free and open to the public.

Wednesday, April 11

  • "Grit, Resiliency and Self-Care" lecture—noon in the Lee Honors College lounge, hosted by the Lee Honors College. Lecture given by Brian Fuller, interim director of WMU Counseling Services. Free and open to the public.
  • CELCIS conversation circle—2 to 3 p.m. in the fourth-floor reception area of Ellsworth Hall, hosted by the Center for English Language and Culture for International Students. Join students learning English in relaxed conversation about local and social topics. Free and open to the public.
  • "Environmental Justice" talk—6 to 8 p.m. in the Trimpe Building Multicultural Center, hosted by the Office of Diversity and Inclusion. The talk will be given by Laura Donders, intern coordinator in the Office for Sustainability. Free and open to the public. 
  • Comtemporary Religious Art in Ethiopia art league—6:30 p.m. at the Kalamazoo Institute of Arts, 314 S Park St., Kalamazoo, hosted by the KIA. Learn about Ethiopian religious art from Dr. Raymond Silverman, the founding Director of the University of Michigan's Museum Studies Program. Open to the public; $12 for the general public, $10 for KIA members, and $3 for students. 
  • "America Divided" film festival—7 to 9 p.m. at the Bernhard Center North Ballroom, hosted by the Walker Institute for the Study of Race and Ethnic Relations, FemiNOW, FOCUS Kalamazoo, and Sincerely From. Attend a film festival focusing on inequality in everyday lives with "A House Divided" a movie about New York City's affordability crisis. Doors open at 6:30 p.m; Free and open to the public. 

Thursday, April 12

  • CELCIS conversation circle (women only)—2 to 3 p.m. in the Bernhard Center Bronco Global Lounge, hosted by the Center for English Language and Culture for International Students. Join students learning English in relaxed conversation about local and social topics. Free and open to the public.
  • Public input session—4 to 6 p.m. in the Bernhard Center lobby. Input neededfor WMU's proposed new student center in the South Neighborhood. Free and open to the public. 
  • "Inequality, Citizenship and the Promise of Education talk—7 p.m. in 2452 Knauss Hall, hosted by the University Center for the Humanities. The talk will be given by Daniella Allen, professor of government and in the Graduate School of Education at Harvard University and director of the Edmond J. Safra Center for Ethics. Free and open to the public. 
  • Public input session—6 to 8 p.m. in the Bernhard Center lobby. Input neededfor WMU's proposed new student center in the South Neighborhood. Free and open to the public. 

Saturday, April 14

  • Kalamazoo Color Run 5k—10 a.m. at Arcadia Creek Festival Place, 145 E Water St., Kalamazoo, hosted by the Kalamazoo Color Run.  Bringing people together and make the world a happier, healthier place by creating an experience that’s more about the memories you make than your mile per minute, we made running feel accessible to a broader demographic. Registration costs may very. 
  • Spring Choreographer Showcase—6:30 to 7:30 p.m. at the Rootead Enrichment Center, 1501 Fulford St., Kalamazoo, hosted by Rootead. Witness movement arts from Kalamazoo and surrounding communities. Tickets are $8-$10; open to the public. 

Monday, April 16

  • "Michigan, My Michigan: A History of the State- British Control to Territorial Michigan" discussion—7 to 8:30 p.m. at the Kalamazoo Public Library Van Deusen Room, 315 S Rose St., Kalamazoo, hosted by the Kalamazoo Public Library. Join Lynn Houghton for a multi-session journey looking at all aspects of Michigan's growth. Free and open to the public.

Wednesday, April 18

  • "Education Reform and the Promise of Public Education" lecture—7 p.m. in 2000 Schneider Hall, hosted by Center for the Humanities. The lecture will be given by Dr. Diane Ravitch, leading national advocate for public education. Free and open to the public.

Thursday, April 19

  • Freshwater Science and Sustainability Information Session—5 to 6:30 p.m. at Northwestern Michigan College Great Lakes Campus Room 111, 715 E. Front St., Traverse City. You can talk with program faculty and advisor about this unique, interdisciplinary bachelor's degree. WMU will pay your application fee if you attend and apply for this program by May 4. Free and open to the public.
  • American Promise Panel Discussion—7 to 8:30 p.m. at the Kalamazoo Public Library Van Deusen Room, 315 S Rose St., Kalamazoo, hosted by the Kalamazoo Public Library.  Watch clips from the "American Promise" documentary and hear from a panel of community members on these issues, moderated by Jacob Pinney-Johnson of the Fatherhood Network. Free and open to the public.

Friday, April 20

  • "Nomadic Forms: Sculpture Inspired from Tibetan Plateau" lecture—11 a.m. to noon at the Fountains at Bronson Place, 1700 Bronson Way, Kalamazoo, hosted by the Osher Lifelong Learning Institute. The lecture will be given by Patrick Wilson, sculpture-area coordinator in the Gwen Frostic School of Art and assistant professor of art. Registration is $30 for lecture series; open to the public. 

Saturday, April 21

  • The 2nd Chinese Bridge Competition at Western Michigan University—9 a.m. at Sangren Hall, hosted by the Confucius Institute at Western Michigan University. Chinese Bridge Competition at WMU is a competition where teams from middle and high schools across Southeast Michigan test their knowledge of Chinese language and geography. Free and open to the public. 
  • Chasing Chopin concert—7:30 p.m. at the Little Theatre, hosted by the Gilmore Keyboard Festival. Alpin Hong performs a daring mash-up of autobiographical story telling and dazzling piano performance. Tickets are $5 for adults and kids are free; open to the public. 

Sunday, April 22

  • Vibrant Bounty: Chinese Folk Art from the Shaanxi Region public tour—2 to 3 p.m. in the Kalamazoo Institute of Arts galleries, 314 S Park St., Kalamazoo, hosted by the KIA. Explore the KIA's collection of Chinese Folk Art art on a docent-led tour. Free and open to the public. 
  • Climate Change Movie Night—5 to 7 p.m. at Westminster Presbyterian Church, 1515 Helen Ave., Portage, hosted by Westminster Presbyterian and Citizen's Climate Lobby. Watch "The Age of Consequences," about the impact of climate change on scarcity of resources, migration and conflict. Free and open to the public; doors open at 4 p.m.

Thursday, April 26

  • Christan Sands Trio Concert—at 6:30 and 9:30 p.m. at Bell's Brewery, 355 E Kalamazoo Ave, Kalamazoo, hosted by the Gilmore Keyboard Festival. Listen to jazz pianist Christian Sands fuse swing, bebop, progressive, Brazilian, and Afro-Cuban styles. Tickets are $30; open to the public. 

Sunday, April 29

  • Daniil Trifonov conert—2 p.m. in the Dalton Center Recital Hall, hosted by the Gilmore Keyboard Festival. Listen to Russian pianist Daniil Trifonov play the music of Bartók, Prokofiev, Messiaen, and more. Tickets are $35, $25, and $15, reserved seating. 

March 2018

Thursday, March 1

  • CELCIS conversation circle (women only)—2 to 3 p.m. in the Bernhard Center Bronco Global Lounge, hosted by the Center for English Language and Culture for International Students. Join students learning English in relaxed conversation about local and social topics. Free and open to the public.
  • "Dolores" film screening—5 p.m. at the Arcus Center for Social Justice Leadership, 205 Monroe St., Kalamazoo, presented by the Arcus Center for Social Justice Leadership. The film looks at the life of Dolores Huerta who tirelessly led the fight for racial and labor justice, becoming one of the most defiant feminists of the 20th century. Free and open to the public. 

Sunday, March 4

  • "Musical Images of Japan" taiko drumming performance—4 p.m. at  the Line Fine Arts Building Dalton Theater at Kalamazoo College, 1200 Academy St., Kalamazoo, hosted by the Kalamazoo College Department of Music. Ken Koshio, accompanied by Michigan Hiryu Daiko, performs taiko drumming and traditional sanshin and shinobue. Adult tickets $5, student tickets $2, free for K-Students; open to the public.  

Tuesday, March 6

  • Basic Tibetan Buddhist Principles class—7 to 8:30 p.m. at the Jewel Heart West Michigan People's Church Room 9, 1758  N 10th St. Kalamazoo, hosted by Jewel Heart. This eight week course examines the relevancy of ancient Buddhism in the present day. Course costs $40; free for Jewel Heart members. Open to the public.  

Saturday, March 10

  • Japan Twang: Tsugaru-Jamisen with Sato Michiyoshi performance—3 to 4 p.m. at the Kalamazoo Public Library, 315 S Rose St., Kalamazoo, hosted by the Kalamazoo Public Library. Come enjoy the surprising and exciting music of Japanese Tsugaru-jamisen with the talented Sato Michiyoshi! Sato's performances include everything from traditional folk songs to modern compositions, and are accessible to listeners of all ages. Doors open at 2:30; Seating is limited.  Free and open to the public. 

Monday, March 12

  • Michigan Environmental Policy Issues and Political Solutions talk—12:30 to 2 p.m. in the Lee Honors College Lounge, hosted by the Lee Honors College and the Department of Political Science. Learn about potential political solutions for some of the most important environmental issues in our state. Free and open to the public.
  • CELCIS conversation circle—2 to 3 p.m. in the fourth-floor reception area of Ellsworth Hall, hosted by the Center for English Language and Culture for International Students. Join students learning English in relaxed conversation about local and social topics. Free and open to the public.
  • Sato Michiyoshi Shamisen concert—7:30 p.m. in the Dalton Lecture Hall, hosted by the School of Music and the Soga Japan Center of WMU. Hear virtuoso Sato Michiyoshi on his second world tour performing on the three-stringed Japanese banjo called the shamisen. Free and open to the public. 

Tuesday, March 13

  • International Ladies Sports Club—2 to 3 p.m. at the Student Recreation Center, hosted by International Student Activities. Bond with women from all over the world through sports and exercise. Free and open to all women in the community. 
  • CELCIS conversation circle—2 to 3 p.m. in the Bernhard Center Bronco Global Lounge, hosted by the Center for English Language and Culture for International Students. Join students learning English in relaxed conversation about local and social topics. Free and open to the public.
  • "Homelessness: How it Impacts Families and Children" talk—7 to 8:30 p.m. at Kalamazoo Loaves & Fishes Warehouse, 901 Portage St., Kalamazoo, hosted by Kalamazoo Public Library. Learn from local educators, service providers, and people who experienced homelessness about surviving housing insecurity; moderated by Monica Poucher and Cyekeia Lee. Free and open to the public. 
  • "Korea's Crisis, China's Problem" talk—3:30 p.m. in 3301 Friedmann Hall, hosted by the Timothy Light Center for Chinese Studies, and the Department of Political Science. The talk will be given by Dr. REN Xiao, professor of international politics at the Institute of International Studies, Fudan University, Shanghai, China, and Director of Chinese Foreign Policy. Free and open to a public. 

Wednesday, March 14

  • "How Can Good Enough be Enough: Perfectionism in Perspective" Lyceum Lecture Series—noon in the Lee Honors College Lounge, hosted by the Lee Honors College. Talk will be given by Kate Hibbard-Gibbons, doctoral student in counseling psychology, and Alexander Hamilton, masters student in industrial/organizational behavior management. Free and open to the public. 
  • "Bohai—A Mysterious Kingdon in Northeat Asia" talk—noon in 210 Bernhard Center, hosted by the Haenicke Institute for Global Education, and the Timothy Light Center for Chinese Studies. The talk will be given by Professor Migkun Huo, a visiting scholar from Heilongjiang University, China. Free and open to the public.
  • "Eastern Han Tomb Figurines from Fengjie County: The Diffusion of Han Culture" talk—Noon in 210 Bernhard Center, hosted by the Haenicke Institute for Global Education, and the Timothy Light Center for Chinese Studies. The talk will be given by Ms. Haowen Chen, a Ph.D candidate in the Department of Archaeology and Museum Studies, Renmin University, China. Free and open to the public.
  • CELCIS conversation circle—2 to 3 p.m. in the fourth-floor reception area of Ellsworth Hall, hosted by the Center for English Language and Culture for International Students. Join students learning English in relaxed conversation about local and social topics. Free and open to the public.

Thursday, March 15

  • CELCIS conversation circle (women only)—2 to 3 p.m. in the Bernhard Center Bronco Global Lounge, hosted by the Center for English Language and Culture for International Students. Join students learning English in relaxed conversation about local and social topics. Free and open to the public.

Friday, March 16

  • "The Politics of Climate Change" lecture—11 a.m. to noon at the Fountains at Bronson Place, 1700 Bronson Way, Kalamazoo, hosted by the Osher Lifelong Learning Institute. The lecture will be given by Dr. Denise Keele, associate professor of political science and environmental and sustainability studies. Registration is $30 for lecture series; open to the public. 
  • "More Disasters or a More Sustainable Future? Challenges and Opportunities of Climate Change" geography colloquium—3 to 4 p.m. at 2119 Wood Hall, hosted by the Department of Geography.  This colloquium features Dr. Carol Harden, Professor Emerita of Geography at the University of Tennessee. Free and open to the public.  
  • Real Talk Diversity Series: "Systemic Change at WMU"—6 to 8 p.m. in the Trimpe Building Multicultural Center, hosted by the Office of Diversity and Inclusion. WMU students, staff and faculty who have advocated for and directly affected systemic change at WMU will discuss their efforts, including successes and barriers. Free and open to the public. 

Sunday, March 18

  • Women Artists in the KIA Collection public tour—2 to 3 p.m. in the Kalamazoo Institute of Arts galleries, 314 S Park St., Kalamazoo, hosted by the KIA. Explore the KIA's collection of art featuring women artists on a docent-led tour. Free and open to the public. 
  • Family Strengthing Pogram Mental Health Forum—10 a.m. to 5 p.m. at The Arc Community Advocates, 3901 Emerald Drive, Kalamazoo, hosted by Emerging HOPE.  MLK Celebration event with keynote speaker Kevin Fischer. Registration is $15 and open to the public.

Monday, March 19

  • CELCIS conversation circle—2 to 3 p.m. in the fourth-floor reception area of Ellsworth Hall, hosted by the Center for English Language and Culture for International Students. Join students learning English in relaxed conversation about local and social topics. Free and open to the public.
  • "Education and Equality" book club—6 p.m. in 4267 Health and Human Services Building, hosted by the Center for the Study of Ethics in Society. Join Kathy Purnell, an instructor in the Department of Political Science, discuss Danielle Allen's book based on a series of lectures about education's purpose with a special guest each week. Must register by Monday, March 12; book free to first 10 people who register. 
  • "America Divided" film festival—7 to 9 p.m. at the Bernhard Center North Ballroom, hosted by the Walker Institute for the Study of Race and Ethnic Relations, FemiNOW, FOCUS Kalamazoo, and Sincerely From. Attend a film festival focusing on inequality in everyday lives with "Something in the Water" a movie about the Flint water crisis. Doors open at 6:30 p.m; Free and open to the public. 

Tuesday, March 20

  • CELCIS conversation circle—2 to 3 p.m. in the Bernhard Center Bronco Global Lounge, hosted by the Center for English Language and Culture for International Students. Join students learning English in relaxed conversation about local and social topics. Free and open to the public.
  • Kalamazoo Islamic Center visit—4 p.m. in front of the Waldo Library, hosted by the Comparative Religion Department, the Kalamazoo Islamic Center, the Islam in Global Perspectives Speaker Series, and the Muslim Students' Association. Join a tour of the Kalamazoo Islamic Center to learn about Islam and hear the imam (prayer leader) speak and participate in a question and answer session. Free and open to the public. 

Wednesday, March 21

  • CELCIS conversation circle—2 to 3 p.m. in the fourth-floor reception area of Ellsworth Hall, hosted by the Center for English Language and Culture for International Students. Join students learning English in relaxed conversation about local and social topics. Free and open to the public.
  • "Queering Faith: A 101 on LGBTQ Religious Affiliation" workshop—2 to 4 p.m. in 1110 Adrian Trimpe Building, hosted by Lesbian, Bisexual, Gay, and Trans gender Student Services. This workshops includes an introductory presentation and training on how to rethink LGBTQ narratives that may or may not involve faith. Free and open to the public. 
  • "Telling Migration Stories" research briefing in global studies—4 to 5 p.m. in 3025 Brown Hall, hosted by the Global and International Studies Program. This talk features Ann Miles and Susan Pozo. Free and open to the public. 
  • "Mediating Cybersecurity Discourse: A Comparative Study between China and the United States" talk—4 p.m. in 2130 Sangren Hall, hosted by the Timothy Light Center for Chinese Studies, the Haenicke Institute for Global Education, the School of Communication, the Confucius Institute at WMU, and Kalamazoo Valley Community College. The talk will be given by Dr. Junfang Zhang, a professor at School of Journalism and Communication in Shanghai International Studies University, China. Free and open to the public. 

Thursday, March 22

  • CELCIS conversation circle (women only)—2 to 3 p.m. in the Bernhard Center Bronco Global Lounge, hosted by the Center for English Language and Culture for International Students. Join students learning English in relaxed conversation about local and social topics. Free and open to the public.
  • "Trans 101" workshop—2 to 4 p.m. in 1110 Adrian Trimpe Building, hosted by Lesbian, Bisexul, Gay, and Transgender Student Services. This workshop will explore gender spectrum, identity, and expression as well as how to best support trans/gender non-conforming communities. Free and open to the public. 
  • "Education Reform and the Promise of Public Education" humanities speaker series—7 to 9 p.m. at the Dalton Center Recital Hall, hosted by the University Center for the Humanities. The presentation will be given by Diane Ravitch, a research professor at New York University's Steinhardt School of Culture, Education, and Human Development. Free and open to the public. 

Friday, March 23

  • "Challenges for Democracy and Global Society in the Trump Era" lecture—3 to 4:30 p.m. in 2212 Dunbar Hall, hosted by the Department of Economics, the Center for Humanities, African Developement Policy Research, Light Center for Chinese Studies and Haenicke Institutue for Global Education. Lecture by Edward A. Kolodziej, Emeritus Research Professor of Political Science at the University of Illinois. Free and open to the public. 

Saturday, March 24

  • Latvian Centennial Arts Weekend—noon to 8 p.m. at the Richmond Center for Visual Arts and at the Kalamazoo Latvian Center, 100 Cherry Hill St., Kalamazoo, hosted by the Kalamazoo Latvian Association. Commemorating 100 years since Latvia declared its independence. Registration is at noon; $30 ($15 for students) for dinner and concert, the other events are free. 
  • March for Our Lives Grand Rapids—noon to 6 p.m. at Rosa Parks Circle, Monroe Center and Monroe Ave. Grand Rapids, hosted by Our Revolution Grand Rapids. A march for the victims and survivors of school shootings in the effort to see gun control reform.  Free and open to the public. 

Sunday, March 25

  • Latvian Centennial Arts Weekend—1 to 4 p.m. at the Richmond Center for Visual Arts and Dalton Center, hosted by the Kalamazoo Latvian Association. Commemorating 100 years since Latvia declared its independence. Register on March 24 at noon; $30 ($15 for students) for Saturday dinner and concert, other events are free.  
  • 29th Annual International Festival—4 to 8 p.m. on the second floor of the Bernhard Center, hosted by International Student Activities and various registered student organizations. Take a trip around the world without leaving Michigan by attending the 29th Annual International Festival which features food, dance, dress and culture from around the world. Free and open to the public; nominal charge for food. 

Monday, March 26

  • CELCIS conversation circle—2 to 3 p.m. in the fourth-floor reception area of Ellsworth Hall, hosted by the Center for English Language and Culture for International Students. Join students learning English in relaxed conversation about local and social topics. Free and open to the public.
  • "Education and Equality" book club—6 p.m. in 4267 Health and Human Services Building, hosted by the Center for the Study of Ethics in Society. Join Kathy Purnell, an instructor in the Department of Political Science, discuss Danielle Allen's book based on a series of lectures about education's purpose with a special guest each week. Must register by Monday, March 12; book free to first 10 people who register. 

Tuesday, March 27

  • International Ladies Sports Club—2 to 3 p.m. at the Student Recreation Center, hosted by International Student Activities. Bond with women from all over the world through sports and exercise. Free and open to all women in the community. 
  • CELCIS conversation circle—2 to 3 p.m. in the Bernhard Center Bronco Global Lounge, hosted by the Center for English Language and Culture for International Students. Join students learning English in relaxed conversation about local and social topics. Free and open to the public.
  • "Our Lady is No 'Lady"—Difficult Women in Fiction" gender scholar award presentation—3:30 to 5 p.m. at 3025 Brown Hall hosted by the College of Arts and Sciences. Recipient of this year's Gender Scholar Award, Thisbe Nissen, will discuss the gender politics of publishing fiction in the twenty-first century. Free and open to the public.

Wednesday, March 28

  • "Institutions, Structures and Policy Paradigms in Sub-Saharan Africa: Toward Understanding Inequality" lecture—noon to 1:15 p.m. in 2028 Brown Hall, hosted by the Department of Economics. The lecture will be given by Howard Stein, professor of Afro-American and African Studies and epidemiology in the School of Public Health at the University of Michigan. 
  • CELCIS conversation circle—2 to 3 p.m. in the fourth-floor reception area of Ellsworth Hall, hosted by the Center for English Language and Culture for International Students. Join students learning English in relaxed conversation about local and social topics. Free and open to the public.

Thursday, March 29

  • CELCIS conversation circle (women only)—2 to 3 p.m. in the Bernhard Center Bronco Global Lounge, hosted by the Center for English Language and Culture for International Students. Join students learning English in relaxed conversation about local and social topics. Free and open to the public.
  • Reading Together book discussion—6:30 to 8 p.m. in the Arcus Center for Social Justice Leadership lobby, 205 Monroe St., Kalamazoo, hosted by the Kalamazoo Public Library and Society for History and Racial Equality. Led by Kris Miller with the Fair Housing Center of Southwest Michigan. Free and open to the public. 
  • "American Islamophobia: Understanding the Roots and Rise of Fear" lecture—7:30 p.m. at the Fetzer Center Putney Lecture Hall, hosted by the Department of Comparative Religion. Examines how law, policy, and official state rhetoric has fueled a frightening resurgence of Islamophobia. Free and open to the public. 

 

February 2018

Thursday, February 1

  • CELCIS conversation circle (women only)—2 to 3 p.m. in the Bernhard Center Bronco Global Lounge, hosted by the Center for English Language and Culture for International Students. Join students learning English in relaxed conversation about local and social topics. Free and open to the public.

Saturday, February 3

  • Community African dance class—1 to 2 p.m. at the Rootead Enrichment Center, 1501 Fulford St., Kalamazoo, hosted by Rootead. This community class which focuses on African dance encourages the entire family to attend. First class is always free, $10 for non-members; open to the public. 

Sunday, February 4

  • "Rhythmic Vitality: Six Principles of Chinese Painting" exhibit tour—2 to 3 p.m. at the Kalamazoo Institute of Arts, 314 S. Park St., Kalamazoo, sponsored by the Santreece Foundation. Join a tour of the current exhibition in the KIA Asian Gallery, "Rhythmic Vitality: Six Principles of Chinese Painting." Entrance included with museum admissions; open to the public. 

Monday, February 5

  • "China in the World: Conundrums of a Socialist Market Economy" talk—noon to 1 p.m. in the Recital Hall in the Covenant Fine Arts Center at Calvin College, 1795-1835 Knollcrest Circle SE, Grand Rapids, hosted by the World Affairs Council of Western Michigan. The talk will be given by Dr. Badrinath Rao, associate professor of sociology and Asian studies at Kettering University. Admission is $10; open to the public. 
  • CELCIS conversation circle—2 to 3 p.m. in the fourth-floor reception area of Ellsworth Hall, hosted by the Center for English Language and Culture for International Students. Join students learning English in relaxed conversation about local and social topics. Free and open to the public.
  • "China in the World: Conundrums of a Socialist Market Economy" talk—6 to 7:15 p.m. in the Aquinas College Performing Arts Center, 1703 Robinson Rd. SE, East Grand Rapids, hosted by the World Affairs Council of Western Michigan. The talk will be given by Dr. Badrinath Rao, associate professor of sociology and Asian studies at Kettering University. Admission is $10; open to the public. 
  • "Signposts Along the way: The Hatred that led to the Holocaust and its Current Implications" lecture— 7 p.m. in room 2000 at Schneider Hall, hosted by the Academically Talented Youth Program. Holocaust survivor and Director of the Holocaust Research Center, Irving Roth, will speak on the hatred leading up to the Holocaust. Free and open to the public.

Tuesday, February 6

  • International Ladies Sports Club—2 to 3 p.m. at the Student Recreation Center, hosted by International Student Activities. Bond with women from all over the world through sports and exercise. Free and open to all women in the community. 
  • CELCIS conversation circle—2 to 3 p.m. in the Bernhard Center Bronco Global Lounge, hosted by the Center for English Language and Culture for International Students. Join students learning English in relaxed conversation about local and social topics. Free and open to the public.
  • "Meditation for Clarity and Insight" course—7 to 8:30 p.m. at the People's Church, 1758 N. Tenth St., Kalamazoo, hosted by the Jewel Heart Buddhist Learning Center. This eight week course is designed to help those new to meditation learn techniques in mindfulness and concentration. Free and open to the public. 

Wednesday, February 7

  • CELCIS conversation circle—2 to 3 p.m. in the fourth-floor reception area of Ellsworth Hall, hosted by the Center for English Language and Culture for International Students. Join students learning English in relaxed conversation about local and social topics. Free and open to the public.
  • "Dragon and Eagle in Africa: Comparing China and America's Influence in Africa" talk—4 p.m. in 2130 Sangren Hall, hosted by the Haenicke Institute for Global Education, the Timothy Light Center for Chinese Studies, the Department of Economics, the Department of Political Science, the Confucius Institute at WMU,  the Center for African Development Policy Research and Kalamazoo Valley Community College. The talk will be given by Dr. Jijun Ran, a Fulbright visiting scholar affiliated to SAIS of Johns Hopkins University.

Thursday, February 8

  • CELCIS conversation circle (women only)—2 to 3 p.m. in the Bernhard Center Bronco Global Lounge, hosted by the Center for English Language and Culture for International Students. Join students learning English in relaxed conversation about local and social topics. Free and open to the public.
  • "Tell Them We Are Rising" film screening—5 to 8 p.m. at the Arcus Center for Social Justice Leadership, 205 Monroe St., Kalamazoo, presented by the Lewis Walker Institute for the Study of Race and Ethnic Relations, Kalamazoo College, the Black Arts and Cultural Center, the Douglass Community Association and the Society for History and Racial Equity. The film reveals the rich history of HBCU's and the power of higher education to transform lives. Free and open to the public. 
  • "The Relevance, Reward and Risk of Feminist Activism in the Academy" ethics talk— 5:30 to 6:30 p.m. in 1910 Sangren Hall, hosted by the College of Arts and Sciences Women's Caucus. The talk will be given by Dr. Kristine De Welde, director of the women's and gender studies program and professor of sociology at the College of Charleston. Free and open to the public. 

Saturday, February 10

  • Tai Chi for Kids—11 a.m. to noon at the Kalamazoo Public Library Oshtemo Branch Community Room, 7265 W Main St., Kalamazoo, hosted by the Kalamazoo Public Library.  Celebrate the Year of the Dog by learning basic moves of this ancient Chinese art.  Best for grades 3-5; families welcome. Registration required.    
  • Community African dance class—1 to 2 p.m. at the Rootead Enrichment Center, 1501 Fulford St., Kalamazoo, hosted by Rootead. This community class which focuses on African dance encourages the entire family to attend. First class is always free, $10 for non-members; open to the public. 

Monday, February 12

  • "Trouble Brewing: Can the U.S. and Turkey Cooperate?" talk—noon to 1 p.m. in the Recital Hall in the Covenant Fine Arts Center at Calvin College, 1795-1835 Knollcrest Circle SE, Grand Rapids, hosted by the World Affairs Council of Western Michigan. The talk will be given by Dr. Sinan Ciddi, executive director of the Institute of Turkish Studies at Georgetown University. Admission is $10; open to the public. 
  • CELCIS conversation circle—2 to 3 p.m. in the fourth-floor reception area of Ellsworth Hall, hosted by the Center for English Language and Culture for International Students. Join students learning English in relaxed conversation about local and social topics. Free and open to the public.
  • "Trouble Brewing: Can the U.S. and Turkey Cooperate?" talk—6 to 7:15 p.m. in the Aquinas College Performing Arts Center, 1703 Robinson Rd. SE, East Grand Rapids, hosted by the World Affairs Council of Western Michigan. The talk will be given by Dr. Sinan Ciddi, executive director of the Institute of Turkish Studies at Georgetown University. Admission is $10; open to the public. 

Tuesday, February 13

  • 2018 National African American Read-In—All day at the Kalamazoo Public Library Alma Powell Branch, 1000 W Paterson St., Kalamazoo, hosted by the Kalamazoo Public Library. Read, listen, and share books written by and about African Americans; Special guest readers visiting throughout the day. Free and open to the public 
  • "Lost Kingdoms of Africa Ethiopia" ARTbreak video—12 p.m. at the Kalamazoo Institute of Arts Auditorium, 314 S Park St. Kalamazoo, hosted by the KIA.  Enjoy a film tracing Ethiopia's heritage featuring Dr. Gus Casely-Hayford, British art historian.  Free and open to the public. 
  • CELCIS conversation circle—2 to 3 p.m. in the Bernhard Center Bronco Global Lounge, hosted by the Center for English Language and Culture for International Students. Join students learning English in relaxed conversation about local and social topics. Free and open to the public.
  • "Representations of the Body in 1960's Japan: From the Playwright and Novelist Kara Juro" talk—3:30 tp 4:30 p.m. in 3025 Brown Hall, hosted by the Department of World Languages and Literatures and the Soga Japan Center. The talk will be given by Kara Juro, an award-winning critic known for his research into Japanese experimental theater and postwar poetry. Free and open to the public. 
  • "Meditation for Clarity and Insight" course—7 to 8:30 p.m. at the People's Church, 1758 N. Tenth St., Kalamazoo, hosted by the Jewel Heart Buddhist Learning Center. This eight week course is designed to help those new to meditation learn techniques in mindfulness and concentration. Free and open to the public. 

Wednesday, February 14

  • "Why has Income Inequality Increased while Education Inequality has Decreased in Many Developing Countries" lecture—noon to 1:15 p.m. in 2028 Brown Hall, hosted by the Department of Economics. The lecture will be given by Dr. David Lam, professor of economics and director of the Institute for Social Research at the University of Michigan. Free and open to the public. 
  • CELCIS conversation circle—2 to 3 p.m. in the fourth-floor reception area of Ellsworth Hall, hosted by the Center for English Language and Culture for International Students. Join students learning English in relaxed conversation about local and social topics. Free and open to the public.

Thursday, February 15

  • CELCIS conversation circle (women only)—2 to 3 p.m. in the Bernhard Center Bronco Global Lounge, hosted by the Center for English Language and Culture for International Students. Join students learning English in relaxed conversation about local and social topics. Free and open to the public.
  • "Unlikely Allies: the Case for Aligning Business and Social Justice" talk—6 to 8 p.m. in the Trimpe Building Multicultural Center, hosted by the Office of Diversity and Inclusion. The talk will be given by Tim Terrentine, vice president for development and alumni relations at WMU. Free and open to the public. 

Saturday, February 17

  • Community African dance class—1 to 2 p.m. at the Rootead Enrichment Center, 1501 Fulford St., Kalamazoo, hosted by Rootead. This community class which focuses on African dance encourages the entire family to attend. First class is always free, $10 for non-members; open to the public. 
  • 2018 Chinese New Year gala—3 p.m. in the Bernhard Center North Ballroom, hosted by the Confucius Institute at WMU. The gala celebrates the Chinese New Year and will feature on-stage performances, games, snacks and raffles. Free and open to the public. 
  • Wu Man Shanghai Quartet performance—7:30 p.m. at the Dalton Center Recital Hall, hosted by the School of Music. The acclaimed Shanghai Quartet and pipa virtuoso Wu Man unite to perform new works by contemporary Chinese composers for string quartet and pipa. Regular tickets $28-32, student tickets $15, rush tickets (limited) $5; open to the public.

Sunday, February 18

  • "Black Lives, Black Words," performance—7:30 p.m. in the York Arena Theatre located in the Gilmore Theater Complex, hosted by the department of theatre in collaboration with the Black Arts and Cultural Center's Face Off Theater Company. Explore black diaspora experiences through a series of original staged readings, spoken word poetry and music. Free and open to the public.

Monday, February 19

  • "The Right Bang for our Bucks: the U.S. Defense Budget" talk—noon to 1 p.m. in the Recital Hall in the Covenant Fine Arts Center at Calvin College, 1795-1835 Knollcrest Circle SE, Grand Rapids, hosted by the World Affairs Council of Western Michigan. The talk will be given by Dr. Stephanie Young, defense budget expert for the RAND Corporation. Admission is $10; open to the public. 
  • CELCIS conversation circle—2 to 3 p.m. in the fourth-floor reception area of Ellsworth Hall, hosted by the Center for English Language and Culture for International Students. Join students learning English in relaxed conversation about local and social topics. Free and open to the public.
  • "The Right Bang for our Bucks: the U.S. Defense Budget" talk—6 to 7:15 p.m. in the Aquinas College Performing Arts Center, 1703 Robinson Rd. SE, East Grand Rapids, hosted by the World Affairs Council of Western Michigan. The talk will be given by Dr. Stephanie Young, defense budget expert for the RAND Corporation. Admission is $10; open to the public. 

Tuesday, February 20

  • International Ladies Sports club—2 to 3 p.m. at the Student Recreation Center, hosted by International Student Activities. Bond with women from all over the world through sports and exercise. Free and open to all women in the community. 
  • CELCIS conversation circle—2 to 3 p.m. in the Bernhard Center Bronco Global Lounge, hosted by the Center for English Language and Culture for International Students. Join students learning English in relaxed conversation about local and social topics. Free and open to the public.
  • "Meditation for Clarity and Insight" course—7 to 8:30 p.m. at the People's Church, 1758 N. Tenth St., Kalamazoo, hosted by the Jewel Heart Buddhist Learning Center. This eight week course is designed to help those new to meditation learn techniques in mindfulness and concentration. Free and open to the public. 

Wednesday, February 21

  • CELCIS conversation circle—2 to 3 p.m. in the fourth-floor reception area of Ellsworth Hall, hosted by the Center for English Language and Culture for International Students. Join students learning English in relaxed conversation about local and social topics. Free and open to the public.
  • "America Divided" film festival—7 to 9 p.m. at the Bernhard Center North Ballroom, hosted by the Walker Institute for the Study of Race and Ethnic Relations, FemiNOW, FOCUS Kalamazoo, and Sincerely From. Attend a film festival focusing on inequality in everyday lives with "The System" a movie about police brutality. Doors open at 6:30 p.m; Free and open to the public. 

Thursday, February 22

  • CELCIS conversation circle (women only)—2 to 3 p.m. in the Bernhard Center Bronco Global Lounge, hosted by the Center for English Language and Culture for International Students. Join students learning English in relaxed conversation about local and social topics. Free and open to the public.
  • "Diversity in Cities: Past and Present" research breifing in global education—4 to 5 p.m. in 3025 Brown Hall, hosted by the Global and International Studies Program.  This talk features Alisa Perkins and James Palmitessa. Free and open to the public. 

Friday, February 23

  • Spring Convocation: "A Recognition of Discovery, Diversity and Global Engagement"—8 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. at the Fetzer Center, hosted by Western Michigan University. The convocation will include scholar talks, a luncheon, convocation, an awards ceremony and a reception for the WMU community. Free and open to WMU staff and faculty. 

Saturday, February 24

  • Community African dance class—1 to 2 p.m. at the Rootead Enrichment Center, 1501 Fulford St., Kalamazoo, hosted by Rootead. This community class which focuses on African dance encourages the entire family to attend. First class is always free, $10 for non-members; open to the public.

Sunday, February 25

  • African American art and artists in the KIA collection public tour—2 to 3 p.m. in the Kalamazoo Institute of Arts galleries, 314 S Park St. Kalamazoo, hosted by the KIA. Explore the KIA's collection of African-American art and its artists on a docent-led tour. Free and open to the public. 

Monday, February 26

  • "Is American Global Leadership Waning?" talk—noon to 1 p.m. in the Recital Hall in the Covenant Fine Arts Center at Calvin College, 1795-1835 Knollcrest Circle SE, Grand Rapids, hosted by the World Affairs Council of Western Michigan. The talk will be given by Dr. Amitav Acharya, chair of UNESCO Transnational Challenges and Governance and professor of international relations in the School of International Service at American University. Admission is $10; open to the public. 
  • CELCIS conversation circle—2 to 3 p.m. in the fourth-floor reception area of Ellsworth Hall, hosted by the Center for English Language and Culture for International Students. Join students learning English in relaxed conversation about local and social topics. Free and open to the public.
  • The New Black Renaissance lecture—6 p.m. at Dalton Center, hosted by the Division of Multicultural Affairs. Explore the nuances of Black music, honoring the musical genres of spirituals, jazz, soul, gospel, and rhythme and blues. Free and open to the public. 
  • "Is American Global Leadership Waning?" talk—6 to 7:15 p.m. in the Aquinas College Performing Arts Center, 1703 Robinson Rd. SE, East Grand Rapids, hosted by the World Affairs Council of Western Michigan. The talk will be given by Dr. Amitav Acharya, chair of UNESCO Transnational Challenges and Governance and professor of international relations in the School of International Service at American University. Admission is $10; open to the public. 

Tuesday, February 27

  • CELCIS conversation circle—2 to 3 p.m. in the Bernhard Center Bronco Global Lounge, hosted by the Center for English Language and Culture for International Students. Join students learning English in relaxed conversation about local and social topics. Free and open to the public.
  • "Meditation for Clarity and Insight" course—7 to 8:30 p.m. at the People's Church, 1758 N. Tenth St., Kalamazoo, hosted by the Jewel Heart Buddhist Learning Center. This eight week course is designed to help those new to meditation learn techniques in mindfulness and concentration. Free and open to the public. 

Wednesday, February 28

  • "The Sombodiness of African American Men" lecture—noon to 1 p.m. in the Lee Honors College lounge, hosted by the Lee Honors College Lyceum Lecture Series. The lecture will be given by Dr. Phillip Johnson, associate professor in counselor education and counseling psychology at WMU. Free and open to the public. 
  • CELCIS conversation circle—2 to 3 p.m. in the fourth-floor reception area of Ellsworth Hall, hosted by the Center for English Language and Culture for International Students. Join students learning English in relaxed conversation about local and social topics. Free and open to the public.
  • "Legal Ethics in Media" ethics panel discussion—4 p.m. at the Bernhard Center Brown and Gold Room, hosted by the Center for Humanities. Join panelists Norman Hawker of WMU, and Tonya Krause-Phlan and Victoria Viletich of  WMU Cooley Law School in a discussion about the role of media ethics. Free and open to the public.
  • Imani Winds concert—7:30 p.m. at the Dalton Center Recital Hall hosted by the School of Music. Come listen to one of the most successful chamber music ensembles in the United States. 7 p.m. discussion hosted by Dr. Robert White. Regular tickets are $12, senior $10, and student $5; open to the public. 

January 2018

Saturday, January 6

  • "Anansi and the Pot of Beans" performance—2 to 3 p.m. at the Kalamazoo Public Library, 315 S. Rose St., Kalamazoo, presented by Rootead. Join Rootead in bringing this classic African folktale to life through drum, song and dance. Free and open to the public.  

Monday, January 8

  • Afro-modern dance class—5:15 to 6:15 p.m. at the Rootead Enrichment Center, 1501 Fulford St., Kalamazoo, hosted by Rootead and Dancemakers Initiative. Join the class to learn about the basic Katherine Dunham technique which combines African and Caribbean styles of movement. First class is always free, $10 for non-members; open to the public.

Tuesday, January 9

  • "Meditation for Clarity and Insight" course—7 to 8:30 p.m. at the People's Church, 1758 N. Tenth St., Kalamazoo, hosted by the Jewel Heart Buddhist Learning Center. This eight week course is designed to help those new to meditation learn techniques in mindfulness and concentration. Free and open to the public. 

Wednesday, January 10

  • "Food in China: Successes and Challenges in the World's Largest Market" talk—2 p.m. in the Heining Emeriti Lounge in West Walwood Hall, hosted by the Emeriti Council. The talk will be given by Dr. Ann Veeck, professor of marketing at WMU. Free and open to the public. 

Thursday, January 11

  • "Last Summer in Paris" film screening—6:30 p.m. at the Kalamazoo Institute of Arts, 314 S. Park St., Kalamazoo, hosted by the Kalamazoo Institute of Arts. Kalamazoo filmmaker Chuck Bentley tells the story of four young scholars and their two-day adventure in the city of Paris before classes begin. Museum admission is $5 for adults, $2 for students; open to the public. 

Saturday, January 13

  • Community African dance class—1 to 2 p.m. at the Rootead Enrichment Center, 1501 Fulford St., Kalamazoo, hosted by Rootead. This community class which focuses on African dance encourages the entire family to attend. First class is always free, $10 for non-members; open to the public. 

Monday, January 15

  • "Addressing Threats to Justice, Climate, Civil Rights and World Peace: A Day of Learning and Action" teach-in—10 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the Bernhard Center, hosted by the Office of Diversity and Inclusion. The teach-in will feature discussions of threats to justice, climate, civil rights and world peace and will be led by various WMU professors. Free and open to the public. 

  • Afro-modern dance class—5:15 to 6:15 p.m. at the Rootead Enrichment Center, 1501 Fulford St., Kalamazoo, hosted by Rootead and Dancemakers Initiative. Join the class to learn about the basic Katherine Dunham technique which combines African and Caribbean styles of movement. First class is always free, $10 for non-members; open to the public.

Tuesday, January 16 

  • "Meditation for Clarity and Insight" course—7 to 8:30 p.m. at the People's Church, 1758 N. Tenth St., Kalamazoo, hosted by the Jewel Heart Buddhist Learning Center. This eight week course is designed to help those new to meditation learn techniques in mindfulness and concentration. Free and open to the public. 

Wednesday, January 17

  • CAS Study Abroad Expo—11 a.m. to 2 p.m. in the Brown Hall Lobby, hosted by Study Abroad and the College of Arts and Sciences. Check out short-term, faculty-led study abroad opportunities for CAS students over spring, summer and winter recesses. Free and open to the public.
  • "Reaching the Dream" luncheon—11 a.m. to 2 p.m., at the Bistro3, Burnham, Hoekje/Bigelow and Valley Dining Centers, hosted by WMU Dining Services. Dishes from regions across the United States will be featured, highlighting Martin Luther King Jr.'s emphasis on unity and persistence in times of controversy. Cost is $9.50 per person, meal plans and Dining Dollars are accepted; open to the public. 
  • "Signs for Those Seeking Light" and "Altars and Myths" exhibits opening reception—5 to 7 p.m. at the Richmond Center for Visual Arts, sponsored by the Kalamazoo Latvian Association, the Ministry of Culture of Latvia, the Frostic School of Art Students and the Friends of the Richmond Center. Artist Rita Grendze offers homage to Latvia's 100th anniversary since declaring its independence in 1918 in her massive installation of donated and cast-off books that have been cut by hand, mounted and suspended. The "Altars and Myths" exhibit features more than a dozen sculptures inspired by the wisdom of ancient Latvian folklore, Peruvian shaman teachings and mythological Tibetan concepts. RSVP required to art-exhibitions@wmich.edu; free and open to the public. 

Thursday, Jan. 18

  • CEHD Study Abroad Expo11 a.m. to 2 p.m. in the Sangren Hall Atrium, hosted by Study Abroad and the College of Education and Human Services. Check out short-term, faculty-led study abroad opportunities for CEHD students over spring, summer and winter recesses. Free and open to the public.
  • "What the Russian Revolution Meant for Modern Art" talk—7 to 9 p.m. in 157 Bernhard Center, hosted by the International Youth and Students for Social Equality at WMU. The talk will discuss the impact and influence of the Russian Revolution on art and culture. Free and open to the public. 

Friday, January 19

  • "Disrupting the Culture of Silence: Confronting Gender Inequality and Making Change in Higher Education" book discussion—11 a.m. to 1 p.m. in Brown Hall's second-floor Clifford Center, hosted by the Women's Caucus. Join the discussion Kris De Welde's "Disrupting the Culture of Silence: Confronting Gender Inequality and Making Change in Higher Education." Free and open to the public; refreshments provided. Free copies of the book are available for the first 20 people who register. 
  • Legally Desi—7 to 10 p.m. at the New Wesley Foundation, 820 Rankin Rd., Kalamazoo, hosted by the Indian Student Association, the Western Student Association and the Graduate Student Association. A celebration of Indian culture. Free and open to the public. 

Saturday, January 20

  • Community African dance class—1 to 2 p.m. at the Rootead Enrichment Center, 1501 Fulford St., Kalamazoo, hosted by Rootead. This community class which focuses on African dance encourages the entire family to attend. First class is always free, $10 for non-members; open to the public. 

Monday, January 22

  • CELCIS conversation circle—2 to 3 p.m. in the fourth-floor reception area of Ellsworth Hall, hosted by the Center for English Language and Culture for International Students. Join students learning English in relaxed conversation about local and social topics. Free and open to the public.
  • Afro-modern dance class—5:15 to 6:15 p.m. at the Rootead Enrichment Center, 1501 Fulford St., Kalamazoo, hosted by Rootead and Dancemakers Initiative. Join the class to learn about the basic Katherine Dunham technique which combines African and Caribbean styles of movement. First class is always free, $10 for non-members; open to the public.

Tuesday, January 23

  • CHHS Study Abroad Expo—11 a.m. to 2 p.m. in the CHHS Atrium, hosted by Study Abroad and the College of Health and Human Services. Check out short-term, faculty-led study abroad opportunities for CHHS students over spring, summer and winter recesses. Free and open to the public.
  • CELCIS conversation circle—2 to 3 p.m. in the Bernhard Center Bronco Global Lounge, hosted by the Center for English Language and Culture for International Students. Join students learning English in relaxed conversation about local and social topics. Free and open to the public.
  • "Meditation for Clarity and Insight" course—7 to 8:30 p.m. at the People's Church, 1758 N. Tenth St., Kalamazoo, hosted by the Jewel Heart Buddhist Learning Center. This eight week course is designed to help those new to meditation learn techniques in mindfulness and concentration. Free and open to the public. 

Wednesday, January 24

  • "The Easiest Conversation on Race" speaker—11 a.m. at 4240 Student Commons, Kalamazoo Valley Community College, 6767 W. O Ave., Kalamazoo, hosted by Kalamazoo Valley Community College. Join guest speaker Dar Mayweather, CEO of Good Mayweather Consulting, in a discussion on race. Free and open to the public. 
  • CELCIS conversation circle—2 to 3 p.m. in the fourth-floor reception area of Ellsworth Hall, hosted by the Center for English Language and Culture for International Students. Join students learning English in relaxed conversation about local and social topics. Free and open to the public.

Thursday, January 25

  • CELCIS conversation circle (women only)—2 to 3 p.m. in the Bernhard Center Bronco Global Lounge, hosted by the Center for English Language and Culture for International Students. Join students learning English in relaxed conversation about local and social topics. Free and open to the public.

Friday, January 26

  • "Thus Can [a] Man Accustom Himself to Sleep on the Edge of Precipice" geography colloquium—3 to 4 p.m. in 2118 Wood Hall, hosted by the College of Arts and Sciences and the Department of Geography. Dr. Graham Tobin, professor of geosciences at the University of South Florida, will discuss his reasearch in communities located in the shadow of an active volcano in Ecuador. Free and open to the public. 

Saturday, January 27

  • Community African dance class—1 to 2 p.m. at the Rootead Enrichment Center, 1501 Fulford St., Kalamazoo, hosted by Rootead. This community class which focuses on African dance encourages the entire family to attend. First class is always free, $10 for non-members; open to the public. 

Monday, January 29

  • "Are Dictators Getting Smarter?" talk—noon to 1 p.m. in the Recital Hall in the Covenant Fine Arts Center at Calvin College, 1795-1835 Knollcrest Circle SE, Grand Rapids, hosted by the World Affairs Council of Western Michigan. The talk will be given by William Dobson, chief international editor of the International Desk at NPR. Admission is $10; open to the public. 
  • CELCIS conversation circle—2 to 3 p.m. in the fourth-floor reception area of Ellsworth Hall, hosted by the Center for English Language and Culture for International Students. Join students learning English in relaxed conversation about local and social topics. Free and open to the public.
  • Afro-modern dance class—5:15 to 6:15 p.m. at the Rootead Enrichment Center, 1501 Fulford St., Kalamazoo, hosted by Rootead and Dancemakers Initiative. Join the class to learn about the basic Katherine Dunham technique which combines African and Caribbean styles of movement. First class is always free, $10 for non-members; open to the public.
  • "Are Dictators Getting Smarter?" talk—6 to 7:15 p.m. in the Aquinas College Performing Arts Center, 1703 Robinson Rd. SE, East Grand Rapids, hosted by the World Affairs Council of Western Michigan. The talk will be given by William Dobson, chief international editor of the International Desk at NPR. Admission is $10; open to the public. 
  • "Ordinary Men? Perpetrators, Bystanders and Victims in the Holocaust" talk—6:30 to 7:30 p.m. at the Oshtemo Branch Library, 7265 W. Main St., Kalamazoo, hosted by the Kalamazoo Public Library. The talk will be given by Dr. Eli Ruben, professor of history at WMU. Free and open to the public. 

Tuesday, January 30

  • CELCIS conversation circle—2 to 3 p.m. in the Bernhard Center Bronco Global Lounge, hosted by the Center for English Language and Culture for International Students. Join students learning English in relaxed conversation about local and social topics. Free and open to the public.
  • "Meditation for Clarity and Insight" course—7 to 8:30 p.m. at the People's Church, 1758 N. Tenth St., Kalamazoo, hosted by the Jewel Heart Buddhist Learning Center. This eight week course is designed to help those new to meditation learn techniques in mindfulness and concentration. Free and open to the public. 

Wednesday, January 31

  • CELCIS conversation circle—2 to 3 p.m. in the fourth-floor reception area of Ellsworth Hall, hosted by the Center for English Language and Culture for International Students. Join students learning English in relaxed conversation about local and social topics. Free and open to the public.

December 2017

Monday, Dec. 4

  • CELCIS conversation circle—2 to 3 p.m. in the fourth-floor reception area of Ellsworth Hall, hosted by the Center for English Language and Culture for International Students. Join students learning English in relaxed conversation about local and social topics. Free and open to the public.
  • Afro-modern dance class—5:15 to 6:15 p.m. at the Rootead Enrichment Center, 1501 Fulford St., Kalamazoo, hosted by Rootead and Dancemakers Initiative. Join the class to learn about the basic Katherine Dunham technique which combines African and Caribbean styles of movement. First class is always free, $10 for non-members; open to the public.
  • Information Forum on Immigration—6 to 7:30 p.m. at the Oshtemo Branch Library, 7265 W. Main St., Kalamazoo, hosted by the Michigan Immigrant Rights Center. The Michigan Immigrant Rights Center will present updates on federal regulation policies related to immigration, including DACA and the travel ban. Free and open to the public. 

Tuesday, Dec. 5

  • Creating Sculpture in Ibadan, Nigeria with Al LaVergne: ARTbreak talk—noon to 1 p.m. at the Kalamazoo Institute of Arts, 314 S. Park St., Kalamazoo, sponsored by Friendship Village. Join sculptor and retired WMU professor, Albert LaVergne, as he describes the process and the opportunity to build a sculpture from the beginning to the final installation. Free and open to the public. 
  • CELCIS conversation circle—2 to 3 p.m. in the Bernhard Center Bronco Global Lounge, hosted by the Center for English Language and Culture for International Students. Join students learning English in relaxed conversation about local and social topics. Free and open to the public.
  • Mesa Española—4 to 5 p.m. in the Brown Hall lobby, hosted by the Department of Spanish. Practice Spanish with other students and native Spanish speakers. Refreshments provided; free and open to the public. 

  • Kwanzaa Celebration—5:30 to 7 p.m. in the Multicultural Center of the Adrian Trimpe Building, hosted by the Division of Multicultural Affairs and the Office for Diversity and Inclusion. The event will feature traditional Kwanzaa foods as well as a speaker who will explain the meaning of the holiday tradition. Free and open to the public. 
  • Tibetan Buddhist Meditation Study Group—7 tp 8:30 p.m. at the People's Church, 1758 10th St. N., Kalamazoo, hosted by Jewel Heart. The study group offers education on Tibetan Buddhist mediation. Free and open to the public. 

Wednesday, Dec. 6

  • Lyceum Lecture Series: "The Life and Death of Latisha King"—noon to 1 p.m. in the Lee Honors College Lounge, hosted by the Lee Honors College, the Center for the Study of Ethics in Society, Gender and Women's Studies and Philosophy. The lecture will be led by Dr. Gayle Salamon, associate professor of English at Princeton University. Free and open to the public.
  • CELCIS conversation circle—2 to 3 p.m. in the 4th floor reception area of Ellsworth Hall, hosted by the Center for English Language and Culture for International Students. Join students learning English in relaxed conversation about local and social topics. Free and open to the public.
  • Mesa Española—3 to 4 p.m. in the Brown Hall lobby, hosted by the Department of Spanish. Practice Spanish with other students and native Spanish speakers. Refreshments provided; free and open to the public.
  • Community African dance class—7:30 to 8:30 p.m. at the Rootead Enrichment Center, 1501 Fulford St., Kalamazoo, hosted by Rootead. This community class which focuses on African dance encourages the entire family to attend. First class is always free, $10 for non-members; open to the public. 

Thursday, Dec. 7

  • CELCIS conversation circle (women only)—2 to 3 p.m. in the Bernhard Center Bronco Global Lounge, hosted by the Center for English Language and Culture for International Students. Join students learning English in relaxed conversation about local and social topics. Free and open to women in the public. 

Saturday, Dec. 9

  • Rhythmic Vitality: Six Principles of Chinese Painting exhibition opening—Dec. 9 to March 25 at the Kalamazoo Institute of Arts, 314 S. Park St., Kalamazoo, hosted by the Kalamazoo Institute of Arts. The exhibitionwill equip visitors to look further and with greater appreciation using concepts established by one of China's early art critics. Museum admission is $5 for adults, $2 for students; open to the public. 

Monday, Dec. 11

  • Afro-modern dance class—5:15 to 6:15 p.m. at the Rootead Enrichment Center, 1501 Fulford St., Kalamazoo, hosted by Rootead and Dancemakers Initiative. Join the class to learn about the basic Katherine Dunham technique which combines African and Caribbean styles of movement. First class is always free, $10 for non-members; open to the public.

Tuesday, Dec. 12

  • Tibetan Buddhist Meditation Study Group—7 to 8:30 p.m. at the People's Church, 1758 10th St. N., Kalamazoo, hosted by Jewel Heart. The study group offers education on Tibetan Buddhist mediation. Free and open to the public. 

Wednesday, Dec. 13

  • Community African dance class7:30 to 8:30 p.m. at the Rootead Enrichment Center, 1501 Fulford St., Kalamazoo, hosted by Rootead. This community class which focuses on African dance encourages the entire family to attend. First class is always free, $10 for non-members; open to the public. 

Monday, Dec. 18

  • Afro-modern dance class—5:15 to 6:15 p.m. at the Rootead Enrichment Center, 1501 Fulford St., Kalamazoo, hosted by Rootead and Dancemakers Initiative. Join the class to learn about the basic Katherine Dunham technique which combines African and Caribbean styles of movement. First class is always free, $10 for non-members; open to the public.

Tuesday, Dec. 19

  • Tibetan Buddhist Meditation Study Group—7 tp 8:30 p.m. at the People's Church, 1758 10th St. N., Kalamazoo, hosted by Jewel Heart. The study group offers education on Tibetan Buddhist mediation. Free and open to the public. 

Wednesday, Dec. 20

  • Community African dance class—7:30 to 8:30 p.m. at the Rootead Enrichment Center, 1501 Fulford St., Kalamazoo, hosted by Rootead. This community class which focuses on African dance encourages the entire family to attend. First class is always free, $10 for non-members; open to the public. 

November 2017

Wednesday, Nov. 1

  • Native American Month display—daily Nov. 1 to Dec. 1. on the third floor of the Waldo Library, hosted by the Division of Multicultural Affairs. Stop by the Waldo Library to browse a bookcase filled with artifacts, books and articles created by Native American authors. Free and open to the public. 
  • Día de los Muertos altar display—9 a.m. to 5 p.m. on the second floor of the Waldo Library, hosted by the Division of Multicultural Affairs and the Department of Spanish. Come to observe a traditional altar constructed in observance of the Día de los Muertos (Day of the Dead). Free and open to the public. 
  • Lyceum Lecture Series: "Little Word, Big Impact: Negotiating Gender-Neutral Pronouns in Education"—noon to 1 p.m. in the Lee Honors College Lounge, hosted by the Lee Honors College and the College of Education and Human Development. The lecture will be led by Dr. Lee Airton, assistant professor of gender and sexuality in education at Queen's University. Free and open to the public.
  • CELCIS conversation circle—2 to 3 p.m. in the 4th floor reception area of Ellsworth Hall, hosted by the Center for English Language and Culture for International Students. Join students learning English in relaxed conversation about local and social topics. Free and open to the public.
  • Mesa Española—3 to 4 p.m. in the Brown Hall lobby, hosted by the Department of Spanish. Practice Spanish with other students and native Spanish speakers. Refreshments provided; free and open to the public.
  • Ethics Book Club: "The Harm in Hate Speech"—6 p.m. in 2072 Moore Hall, hosted by the Center for the Study of Ethics and Society. Join a discussion of "The Harm in Hate Speech" by Jeremy Waldron led by Kathy Purnell, a part-time instructor in the School of Public Affairs and Administration.  Registration required; free and open to the public. 
  • Community African dance class—7:30 to 8:30 p.m. at the Rootead Enrichment Center, 1501 Fulford St., Kalamazoo, hosted by Rootead. This community class which focuses on African dance encourages the entire family to attend. First class is always free, $10 for non-members; open to the public. 

Thursday, Nov. 2

  • Día de los Muertos altar display—9 a.m. to 5 p.m. on the second floor of the Waldo Library, hosted by the Division of Multicultural Affairs and the Department of Spanish. Come to observe a traditional altar constructed in observance of the Día de los Muertos (Day of the Dead). Free and open to the public. 
  • "Race, Politics and NAFTA" presentation—noon, hosted by the Lewis Walker Institute for the Study of Race and Ethnic Relations. The presentation will be given by James Russel, adjunct professor of political science in the Hatfield School of Government at Portland State University. Free and open to the public. 
  • CELCIS conversation circle (women only)—2 to 3 p.m. in the Bernhard Center Bronco Global Lounge, hosted by the Center for English Language and Culture for International Students. Join students learning English in relaxed conversation about local and social topics. Free and open to women in the public. 
  • Real Talk Diversity Series: "Racial Socialization and the Power of Narrative"—6 to 8 p.m. in the Multicultural Center in the Adrian Trimpe Building, hosted by the Office of Diversity and Inclusion. Join the WMU Student Assembly for Racial Equity and Cultural Inclusion in a critical conversation about the path to building a campus community that dismantles institutionalized racism and White supremacy in all its forms. Refreshments provided; free and open to the public. 
  • "A Man for All Seasons: Saladin, and How the West Made New Races; or Slavery, Sexual Mixing and Slave Dynasties" lecture—7 p.m. in 1028 Brown Hall, hosted by the Medieval Institute. The lecture will be given by Dr. Geraldine Heng, associate professor of English and comparative literature at the University of Texas. Free and open to the public. 
  • Gwen Frostic Reading Series: Reginald Edmund—7 p.m. in 157-158 Bernhard Center, hosted by the Department of English. This installment will feature Reginald Edmund, managing curating producer of Black Lives, Black Words International Project in Chicago. Free and open to the public. 

Friday, Nov. 3

  • Día de los Muertos altar display—9 a.m. to 5 p.m. on the second floor of the Waldo Library, hosted by the Division of Multicultural Affairs and the Department of Spanish. Come to observe a traditional altar constructed in observance of the Día de los Muertos (Day of the Dead). Free and open to the public. 
  • International Ladies Sports Club—2 to 3 p.m. at the Student Recreation Center, hosted by International Student Activities. Bond with women from all over the world through sports and exercise. Free and open to all women in the community. 

Saturday, Nov. 4

  • Día de los Muertos altar display—9 a.m. to 5 p.m. on the second floor of the Waldo Library, hosted by the Division of Multicultural Affairs and the Department of Spanish. Come to observe a traditional altar constructed in observance of the Día de los Muertos (Day of the Dead). Free and open to the public. 
  • Russian Cultural Expo & Conference—10 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. in 1028 Brown Hall, hosted by the Department of English and the Kalamazoo Russian Culture Association. The expo and conference will feature a series of lectures, a performance of a play and a reading set in 1917 Russia. Free and open to the public. 

Sunday, Nov. 5

  • Día de los Muertos altar display—9 a.m. to 5 p.m. on the second floor of the Waldo Library, hosted by the Division of Multicultural Affairs and the Department of Spanish. Come to observe a traditional altar constructed in observance of the Día de los Muertos (Day of the Dead). Free and open to the public. 

Monday, Nov. 6

  • Día de los Muertos altar display—9 a.m. to 5 p.m. on the second floor of the Waldo Library, hosted by the Division of Multicultural Affairs and the Department of Spanish. Come to observe a traditional altar constructed in observance of the Día de los Muertos (Day of the Dead). Free and open to the public. 
  • CELCIS conversation circle—2 to 3 p.m. in the 4th floor reception area of Ellsworth Hall, hosted by the Center for English Language and Culture for International Students. Join students learning English in relaxed conversation about local and social topics. Free and open to the public.
  • Hispanic Film Festival 2017: Chico and Rita—4 p.m. in 1028 Brown Hall, hosted by the Division of Multicultural Affairs and the Department of Spanish. Chico and Rita is an animated film that looks at the Cuban revolution through the love story of Chico and Rita. Free and open to the public.  

Tuesday, Nov. 7

  • Día de los Muertos altar display—9 a.m. to 5 p.m. on the second floor of the Waldo Library, hosted by the Division of Multicultural Affairs and the Department of Spanish. Come to observe a traditional altar constructed in observance of the Día de los Muertos (Day of the Dead). Free and open to the public. 
  • "Our Cosmic Roots: How did Humans Come to be on Planet Earth, and There to Next?" lecture—1:30 p.m. in D-115 Floyd Hall hosted by the College of Engineering and Applied Sciences. The lecture will be given by Dr. Firouz Naderi, retired engineer from NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Free and open to the public. 
  • CELCIS conversation circle—2 to 3 p.m. in the Bernhard Center Bronco Global Lounge, hosted by the Center for English Language and Culture for International Students. Join students learning English in relaxed conversation about local and social topics. Free and open to the public.
  • Mesa Española—4 to 5 p.m. in the Brown Hall lobby, hosted by the Department of Spanish. Practice Spanish with other students and native Spanish speakers. Refreshments provided; free and open to the public. 

  • Hispanic Film Festival 2017: No—5 p.m. in 1028 Brown Hall, hosted by the Division of Multicultural Affairs and the Department of Spanish. No is based on the 1987 presidential campaign that brought an end to the dictatorship of General Pinochet in Chile . Free and open to the public.  
  • Ethics Book Club: "The Left Hand of Darkness"—6 p.m. at the Central City Tap House, 359 S. Kalamazoo Mall, hosted by the Center for the Study of Ethics and Society. Join a discussion of "The Left Hand of Darkness" by Ursula LeGuin led by John Minser, curriculum coordinator at the WMU Homer Stryker M.D. School of Medicine. Registration required; free and open to the public. 

Wednesday, Nov. 8

  • Día de los Muertos altar display—9 a.m. to 5 p.m. on the second floor of the Waldo Library, hosted by the Division of Multicultural Affairs and the Department of Spanish. Come to observe a traditional altar constructed in observance of the Día de los Muertos (Day of the Dead). Free and open to the public. 
  • Lyceum Lecture Series: "Promoting Resilience in Individuals and Couples with LGBTQ+ Identities"—noon to 1 p.m. in the Lee Honors College Lounge, hosted by the Lee Honors College. The lecture will be led by Dr. Gary Bischof, professor and dean of Lee Honors College, and Amber Mosley, coordinator of sexual assault prevention education at Sindecuse Health Center. Free and open to the public.
  • CELCIS conversation circle—2 to 3 p.m. in the 4th floor reception area of Ellsworth Hall, hosted by the Center for English Language and Culture for International Students. Join students learning English in relaxed conversation about local and social topics. Free and open to the public.
  • Mesa Española—3 to 4 p.m. in the Brown Hall lobby, hosted by the Department of Spanish. Practice Spanish with other students and native Spanish speakers. Refreshments provided; free and open to the public.
  • "Top Five Threats to America's National Security" lecture—7 to 8:30 p.m. at the WMU East Beltline Campus, 2333 E. Beltline, Grand Rapids, hosted by the World Affairs Council of Western Michigan. The lecture will be given by Dr. Lori Murray, the former endowed chair for national security for the U.S. Naval Academy. Open to the public; free to WMU students, staff and faculty. 

Thursday, Nov. 9

  • CELCIS conversation circle (women only)—2 to 3 p.m. in the Bernhard Center Bronco Global Lounge, hosted by the Center for English Language and Culture for International Students. Join students learning English in relaxed conversation about local and social topics. Free and open to women in the public. 
  • Hispanic Film Festival 2017: Paraiso Travel—6 p.m. in 1028 Brown Hall, hosted by the Division of Multicultural Affairs and the Department of Spanish. Paraiso Travel is based on the novel by Jorge Frano Ramos that follows a young couple on their journey from Colombia to enter the United States illegally . Free and open to the public.  
  • "Criminal Justice, Social Justice and Climate Justice" lecture—6 p.m. in Brown and Gold Room Bernhard Center, hosted by the Study of Ethics in Society. The lecture will be given by Dr. Ron Kramer, professor of sociology at WMU. Free and open to the public. 

Friday, Nov. 10

  • Women of Color Collaborative Luncheon—11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. in Bernhard Center's South Ballroom, sponsored by the Women's Network of the Michigan American Council on Education. The event will feature key note speaker Dr. Judi Brown Clarke, diversity director for the National Science Foundation's Bio-Computational Evolution in Action Consortium Center headquartered at Michigan State University. Registration required, $60 tickets with dicounts for WMU employees and students; open to the public. 
  • "Strategies to confront implicit biases and avoid micro-aggression" workshop—noon to 1:30 p.m. in 2033 University Computing Center, hosted by the Office of Faculty Development. This installment of the Teaching Inclusivity Series will be presented by Dr.

    Mariam Konaté, associate professor of gender and women's studies. Registration required; open to faculty, graduate students, administrators and administrative staff. 

  • "Youth Unemployment and Terrorism: Empirical Findings and Policy Implications" lecture—3 to 4 p.m. in 2212 Dunbar, sponsored by the Department of Economics, the Center for African Policy and Development Research and the Timothy Light Center for Chinese Studies. The lecture will be given by Dr. Sojo Adelaja, distinguished professor in land policy at Michigan State University. Free and open to the public. 

Saturday, Nov. 11

  • Capoeira dance class—2 to 3:30 p.m. at the Kalamazoo Public Library, 315 S. Rose Street, hosted by the Michigan Festival of Sacred Music. Capoeira is a Brazilian dance developed by escaped slaves in the 16th century and represents both a physical and spiritual liberation. Free and open to the public. Free and open to the public. 

Sunday, Nov. 12

  • International Education Week begins—November 12 to 19, hosted by the Haenicke Institue for Global Education and registered student organizations, academic departments and offices across the WMU campus. International Education Week is a joint initiative of the U.S. Department of State and the U.S. Department of Education in efforts to promote programs that prepare U.S. Americans for a global environment and attract future leaders from abroad to study, learn and exchange experiences. Events vary; open to the public. 
  • International Education Week: Western World Cup Tournament—1 to 7 p.m. at the WMU Student Recreation Center, hosted by International Student Activities and Aspiras. The co-ed soccer tournament will kick off International Education Week at WMU and collect soccer donations for distribution by Aspiras to children in low income soccer clubs in the Dominican Republic. Registration is $5 per player; open to WMU students, staff and faculty. 

Monday, Nov. 13

  • International Education Week: CELCIS conversation circle—2 to 3 p.m. in the 4th floor reception area of Ellsworth Hall, hosted by the Center for English Language and Culture for International Students. Join students learning English in relaxed conversation about local and social topics. Free and open to the public.
  • International Education Week: International Taste Fest Potluck—5 to 7 p.m. in the Lee Honors College lounge, hosted by Lee Honors College and the Western Student Association. Registered Student Organizations are invited to provide food from the cultures represented by students in their organization. Free and open to the public. 
  • Afro-modern dance class—5:15 to 6:15 p.m. at the Rootead Enrichment Center, 1501 Fulford St., Kalamazoo, hosted by Rootead and Dancemakers Initiative. Join the class to learn about the basic Katherine Dunham technique which combines African and Caribbean styles of movement. First class is always free, $10 for non-members; open to the public.

Tuesday, Nov. 14

  • International Education Week: CELCIS conversation circle—2 to 3 p.m. in the Bernhard Center Bronco Global Lounge, hosted by the Center for English Language and Culture for International Students. Join students learning English in relaxed conversation about local and social topics. Free and open to the public.
  • International Education Week: Mesa Española—4 to 5 p.m. in the Brown Hall lobby, hosted by the Department of Spanish. Practice Spanish with other students and native Spanish speakers. Refreshments provided; free and open to the public. 
  • International Education Week: International Trivia Night—6 to 7:30 p.m. in 3508 Knauss Hall, hosted by the Study Abroad Alumni Ambassadors. Test your international knowledge with trivia from around the world. Food and prizes provided; free and open to the public. 
  • "Russia 2018: Putin's Last Act?" lecture—7 to 8:30 p.m. at the WMU Beltline Campus, 2333 E. Beltline Ave. S.E., Grand Rapids, hosted by the World Affairs Council of Western Michigan. The lecture will be given by John Beyrle, the former U.S. ambassador to Russia. Entrance $15; open to the public. 
  • Garba Dancing Night—7:30 to 8:30 p.m. at the Rootead Dance Studio, 1501 Fulford Ave., Kalamazoo, hosted by the Kalamazoo Garba Club. Join the Kalamazoo Garba club for a pop-up dance night to learn and practice the traditional folk dance from India. Entrance is $3; open to the public. 

Wednesday, Nov. 15

  • "Patricia Villalobos Echeverría: Retrace" exhibit—Nov. 16 to Dec. 10 in the Netzorg and Kerr Permanent Collection Gallery, Richmond Center for Visual Arts, hosted by the Gwen Frostic School of Art. The narratives exhibit will showcase three participatory projects: one in Beijing China; another in Managua, Nicaragua; and one here in Southwest Michigan. 
  • International Cultural Celebration—11 to 2 p.m. in the Student Commons TCC, Kalamazoo Valley Community College, 6767 W. O Ave., Kalamazoo, hosted by International Student Services, Office of Diversity and Inclusion and Multicultural Services. The celebration will include cultural presentations, light appetizers, fashion show and cultural play. Free and open to the public.
  • Lyceum Lecture Series: "Transgender Stories"—noon to 1 p.m. in the Lee Honors College Lounge, hosted by the Lee Honors College. The panel-style session will be led by Sara Jacobs, program director of Out Proud Safe, Jay Maddock, executive director of OutFront Kalamazoo and Natalie Nguyen, director of WMU LBGT Student Services. Free and open to the public.
  • International Education Week: CELCIS conversation circle—2 to 3 p.m. in the 4th floor reception area of Ellsworth Hall, hosted by the Center for English Language and Culture for International Students. Join students learning English in relaxed conversation about local and social topics. Free and open to the public.
  • International Education Week: Mesa Española—3 to 4 p.m. in the Brown Hall lobby, hosted by the Department of Spanish. Practice Spanish with other students and native Spanish speakers. Refreshments provided; free and open to the public.
  • International Education Week: "What kind of language is Chinese?" lecture—4 p.m. in 2028 Brown Hall, hosted by the Confucius Institute at WMU. The lecture will be given by Dr. Wenfang Sun, director of the Confucius Institute at WMU. Free and open to the public. 
  • International Education Week: "Vision of Wisdom 2025: Achievements and Challenges of Bahir Dar University Becoming a Premier Research University in Africa" talk—4 to 5:30 p.m. in TBD Sangren Hall, hosted by Center for African Policy Research, College of Arts and Sciences, Department of Economics and the Haenicke Institute for Global Education. The talk will be given by Dr. Matebe Tafere Gedifew, associate professor of educational policy and academic vice president at Bahir Dar University, Ethiopia. Free and open to the public. 
  • International Education Week: Japan Festival—4 to 7 p.m. at the Wesley Foundation, 820 Rankin Road, Kalamazoo, hosted by the Japan Club. The festival will feature traditional foods and cultural activities prepared by the Japan Club at WMU. Free and open to the public. 
  • International Education Week: Rokugo performance—6 p.m. the New Wesley Foundation, 820 Rankin Ave., Kalamazoo, hosted by the Soga Japan Center. Rakugo is a traditional Japanese comedy performance and will be performed by Kimochi, a professional Rakugo performer. Free and open to the public during the Japan Festival. 
  • Ethics Book Club: "The Harm in Hate Speech"—6 p.m. in TBD location, hosted by the Center for the Study of Ethics and Society. Join a discussion of "The Harm in Hate Speech" by Jeremy Waldron led by Kathy Purnell, a part-time instructor in the School of Public Affairs and Administration.  Registration required; free and open to the public. 
  • International Education Week: Rokugo performance—7 p.m. the Wesley Foundation, 2101 Wilbur Ave., hosted by the Soga Japan Center. Rakugo is a traditional Japanese comedy performance and will be performed by Kimochi, a professional Rakugo performer. Free and open to the public during the Japan Festival. 
  • Rose Ensemble and Piffaro—7 p.m. at the Chenery Auditorium, 714 S. Westnedge Ave., hosted by the Michigan Festival of Sacred Dance. The Rose Ensemble guides listeners through music of the first century of the Reformation after Martin Luther nailed his "95 Theses" to the door of the All Saints' Church in Wittenberg, Germany. Tickets start at $5; open to the public. 
  • Community African dance class—7:30 to 8:30 p.m. at the Rootead Enrichment Center, 1501 Fulford St., Kalamazoo, hosted by Rootead. This community class which focuses on African dance encourages the entire family to attend. First class is always free, $10 for non-members; open to the public. 

Thursday, Nov. 16

  • International Education Week: American Thanksgiving—noon to 2 p.m. at Kanley Chapel, hosted by the International Student Fellowship. Join international students at this annual dinner that explains how Thanksgiving fits in to U.S. culture and how it has changed throughout the years. Free and open to the public. 
  • International Education Week: CELCIS conversation circle (women only)—2 to 3 p.m. in the Bernhard Center Bronco Global Lounge, hosted by the Center for English Language and Culture for International Students. Join students learning English in relaxed conversation about local and social topics. Free and open to women in the public. 
  • International Education Week: "The discovery of Puerto Rico in 1493" talk—6:30 to 7:30 p.m. in 1750 Sangren Hall, hosted by the Division of Multicultural Affairs. The talk will be given by Adriana Garriga-Lopez, associate professor of anthropology at Kalamazoo College. Free and open to the public.
  • Dawud Wharnsby with The Red Sea Pedestrians—7 to 9 p.m. at the Dalton Theatre, Kalamazoo College, 1200 Academy St., hosted by the Michigan Festival of Sacred Music. Enjoy the music of Kalamazoo's Red Sea Pedestrians with internationally acclaimed Muslim artist, Dawud Wharnsby, that will touch on social justice issues and beliefs that transcend traditional faiths. Tickets start at $5; open to the public. 

Friday, Nov. 17

  • International Education Week: China Day—1 to 3 p.m. at the Wesley Foundation, 2101 Wilbur Ave., hosted by the the Chinese Association of Students and Scholars. Enjoy demonstrations of Chinese traditional culture through deressing, movies and other activities. Free and open to the public. 
  • International Education Week: "Dams Large and Small: Ecosystem Impacts on the World's Tropical River Systems" colloquium—3 to 4 p.m. in 2119 Wood Hall, hosted by the Department of Geography. The colloquium will feature Dr. Stephen K. Hamilton, professor of ecosystem ecology and biogeochemisty at the W.K. Kellog Biological Station. Free and open to the public. 
  • International Education Wee: Mian (cold noodle) workshop—4 to 6 p.m. at the Parkview Hills Clubhouse, 3707 Greenleaf Cir., Kalamazoo, hosted by the Confucius Institute at WMU. Join this cooking workshop to learn how to make traditional Chinese Mian, cold noodles. RSVP required at wmu-confucius@wmich.edu or (269) 387-3784; free and open to the public. 
  • International Education Week: Orchestra Rouh5:30 to 7:30 p.m. in 2452 Knauss Hall, hosted by the Refugee Outreach Collective and the Arabic Program. Don't miss a performance by Orchestra Rouh, an educational initiative of the Kalamazoo Symphony Orchestra that provides ongoing music instruction to children of Syrian and other refugee families in Kalamazoo. Free and open to the public.

Saturday, Nov. 18

  • International Education Week: Pakistani Saqafat (Colors of Pakistan)—9 to 10 p.m. in the Trimpe Multicultural Center, hosted by the Pakistani Student Association. Join this activity-filled informational night filled with Pakistani culture. The event will include traditional Pakistani food, unique poetry from the region and history taught by Pakistani students. Entrance is $6, includes food and activities; open to the public.
  • International Education Week: Dominican Night—5 to 8 p.m. in the Trimpe Multicultural Center, hosted by the Dominican Student Association. Join this showcase of Dominican food, dancing and overall culture. Food provided; free and open to the public. 

Sunday, Nov. 19

  • Human Flow screening—3:30 at Celebration! Cinema Crossroads, 6600 Ring Rd., Portage, hosted by the Kalamazoo Film Society. Human Flow examines the staggering scale of refugee crisis and its profoundly personal human impact. Tickets start at $6.50; open to the public. 
  • International Education Week: East Asian Pacific Festival—6 to 9 p.m. in the Student Recreation Center, hosted by the Malaysian Student Association. The festival will feature cultural presentations from the Malaysian Student Association, the Japan Club, the Indonesian Student Association, the Philippines Student Association and the Chinese Assocation of Student and Scholars. Food provided; free and open to the public. 

Monday, Nov. 20

  • CELCIS conversation circle—2 to 3 p.m. in the 4th floor reception area of Ellsworth Hall, hosted by the Center for English Language and Culture for International Students. Join students learning English in relaxed conversation about local and social topics. Free and open to the public.
  • Human Flow screening—3:30 at Celebration! Cinema Crossroads, 6600 Ring Rd., Portage, hosted by the Kalamazoo Film Society. Human Flow examines the staggering scale of refugee crisis and its profoundly personal human impact. Tickets start at $6.50; open to the public.  
  • Afro-modern dance class—5:15 to 6:15 p.m. at the Rootead Enrichment Center, 1501 Fulford St., Kalamazoo, hosted by Rootead and Dancemakers Initiative. Join the class to learn about the basic Katherine Dunham technique which combines African and Caribbean styles of movement. First class is always free, $10 for non-members; open to the public.

Tuesday, Nov. 21

  • History of Art in Three Colors, Episode 1: Gold: ARTbreak video—noon to 1 p.m. at the Kalamazoo Institute of Arts, 314 S. Park St., Kalamazoo, sponsored by Friendship Village. This BBC documentary reveals how golden treasures made across the ages reflect everything we have held as sacred. Free and open to the public. 
  • CELCIS conversation circle—2 to 3 p.m. in the Bernhard Center Bronco Global Lounge, hosted by the Center for English Language and Culture for International Students. Join students learning English in relaxed conversation about local and social topics. Free and open to the public.
  • Human Flow screening—3:30 at Celebration! Cinema Crossroads, 6600 Ring Rd., Portage, hosted by the Kalamazoo Film Society. Human Flow examines the staggering scale of refugee crisis and its profoundly personal human impact. Tickets start at $6.50; open to the public. 

Sunday, Nov. 26

  • Women Warriors: Portraits by Hung Liu: Sunday Tour—2 to 3 p.m. at the Kalamazoo Institute of Arts, 314 S. Park St., Kalamazoo, sponsored by the Santreece Foundation. Join a docent-led tour for the last day of the Women Warriors: Portraits by Hung Liu exhibition that showcases the power and perserverance of Chinese women throughout history. Free with museum admission; open to the public. 

Monday, Nov. 27

  • CELCIS conversation circle—2 to 3 p.m. in the 4th floor reception area of Ellsworth Hall, hosted by the Center for English Language and Culture for International Students. Join students learning English in relaxed conversation about local and social topics. Free and open to the public.  
  • Chinese Movie Week: Farewell My Concubine—2 p.m. in 4030 Brown Hall, hosted by the Confucius Institute at WMU. Spanning 53 years, Farewell My Concubine presents the lives of two Peking Opera performers against the historical backdrop of a country in upheaval. Free and open to the public. 
  • Afro-modern dance class—5:15 to 6:15 p.m. at the Rootead Enrichment Center, 1501 Fulford St., Kalamazoo, hosted by Rootead and Dancemakers Initiative. Join the class to learn about the basic Katherine Dunham technique which combines African and Caribbean styles of movement. First class is always free, $10 for non-members; open to the public.

Tuesday, Nov. 28

  • CELCIS conversation circle—2 to 3 p.m. in the Bernhard Center Bronco Global Lounge, hosted by the Center for English Language and Culture for International Students. Join students learning English in relaxed conversation about local and social topics. Free and open to the public.
  • Mesa Española—4 to 5 p.m. in the Brown Hall lobby, hosted by the Department of Spanish. Practice Spanish with other students and native Spanish speakers. Refreshments provided; free and open to the public. 

Wednesday, Nov. 29

  • Lyceum Lecture Series: "Resisting Reconciliation: Queer Muslim Indentity in America"—noon to 1 p.m. in the Lee Honors College Lounge, hosted by the Lee Honors College. The lecture will be led by Mariam Mustafa, comparative religion graduate student. Free and open to the public.
  • CELCIS conversation circle—2 to 3 p.m. in the 4th floor reception area of Ellsworth Hall, hosted by the Center for English Language and Culture for International Students. Join students learning English in relaxed conversation about local and social topics. Free and open to the public.  
  • Chinese Movie Week: Confucius—2:30 p.m. in 4030 Brown Hall, hosted by the Confucius Institute at WMU. Confucius presents the life story of the highly-influential Chinese philosopher. Free and open to the public. 
  • Mesa Española—3 to 4 p.m. in the Brown Hall lobby, hosted by the Department of Spanish. Practice Spanish with other students and native Spanish speakers. Refreshments provided; free and open to the public.
  • Ethics Book Club: "The Harm in Hate Speech"—6 p.m. in TBD location, hosted by the Center for the Study of Ethics and Society. Join a discussion of "The Harm in Hate Speech" by Jeremy Waldron led by Kathy Purnell, a part-time instructor in the School of Public Affairs and Administration.  Registration required; free and open to the public. 
  • Community African dance class—7:30 to 8:30 p.m. at the Rootead Enrichment Center, 1501 Fulford St., Kalamazoo, hosted by Rootead. This community class which focuses on African dance encourages the entire family to attend. First class is always free, $10 for non-members; open to the public. 

Thursday, Nov. 30

  • CELCIS conversation circle (women only)—2 to 3 p.m. in the Bernhard Center Bronco Global Lounge, hosted by the Center for English Language and Culture for International Students. Join students learning English in relaxed conversation about local and social topics. Free and open to women in the public. 
  • Chinese Movie Week: The Grandmaster—2:30 p.m. in 3030 Brown Hall, hosted by the Confucius Institute at WMU. The Grandmaster presents the story of the martial arts master, Tony Leung Chui Wai, who taught the Wing Chun style of Kung Fu to Bruce Lee. Free and open to the public. 

OCTOBER 2017

Monday, Oct. 2

  • CELCIS conversation circle—2 to 3 p.m. in the 4th floor reception area of Ellsworth Hall, hosted by the Center for English Language and Culture for International Students. Join students learning English in relaxed conversation about local and social topics. Free and open to the public.
  • Afro-modern dance class—5:15 to 6:15 p.m. at the Rootead Enrichment Center, 1501 Fulford St., Kalamazoo, hosted by Rootead and Dancemakers Initiative. Join the class to learn about the basic Katherine Dunham technique which combines African and Caribbean styles of movement. First class is always free, $10 for non-members; open to the public.
  • Multicultural Review—7 to 9:30 p.m. in the Miller Auditorium, hosted by the Division of Multicultural Affairs. Join as WMU students display talents in poetry reading, music, dancing and more. Free and open to the public. 

Tuesday, Oct. 3

  • CELCIS conversation circle—2 to 3 p.m. in the 4th floor reception area of Ellsworth Hall, hosted by the Center for English Language and Culture for International Students. Join students learning English in relaxed conversation about local and social topics. Free and open to the public.
  • Mesa Española—4 to 5 p.m. in the Brown Hall lobby, hosted by the Department of Spanish. Practice Spanish with other students and native Spanish speakers. Refreshments provided; free and open to the public. 

  • "Meet Your Muslim Neighbors: An Introduction to Islam" event—6 to 8 p.m. at the Parchment United Methodist Church, 225 Glendale Blvd., Parchment, hosted by Welcoming Michigan. The event will provide an opportunity to learn about Islam, its history in the United States and our common roots. Free and open to the public. 

Wednesday, Oct. 4

  • Local Global Market—10 to 2 p.m. in front of Sangren Hall, hosted by International Student Activities. Area farmers will bring fresh fruits and produce to campus for purchase. Email wayne.l.bond@wmich.edu for questions. Free and open to the public.
  • Lyceum Lecture Series: "LGBTQ+ Representation in Children's Literature"—noon to 1 p.m. in the Lee Honors College Lounge, hosted by the Lee Honors College. The lecture will be led by Dr. Jill Hermann-Wilmarth, WMU professor of teaching, learning and educational studies. Free and open to the public.
  • "DACA, Dreamers and the Undocumented: A Human Rights Perspective" presentation—noon in the Bernhard Center South Ballroom, hosted by the Lewis Walker Institute for the Study of Race and Ethnic Relations. The presentation will be given my Dr. Jorge Bustamante, distinguished sociologist and human rights advocate. Free and open to the public. 
  • CELCIS conversation circle—2 to 3 p.m. in the 4th floor reception area of Ellsworth Hall, hosted by the Center for English Language and Culture for International Students. Join students learning English in relaxed conversation about local and social topics. Free and open to the public.
  • Mesa Española—3 to 4 p.m. in the Brown Hall lobby, hosted by the Department of Spanish. Practice Spanish with other students and native Spanish speakers. Refreshments provided; free and open to the public.
  • Real Talk Diversity Series: "Imagining Inclusion"—6:30 to 8 p.m. in the Multicultural Center in the Adrian Trimpe Building, hosted by the Office of Diversity and Inclusion. The discussion will address the question: How can a movemebt be truly inclusive for everyone, including traditionally silenced individuals and communities? Refreshments provided; free and open to the public. 
  • "Debriefing: Palau" presentation—6 to 7 p.m. in the DeJourno Room at Aquinas College, Woodward Ave., Grand Rapids, hosted by the World Affairs Council of Western Michigan. The presentation will discuss Palau as a key player in our long-term national defense strategy and wil be followed by a panel moderated by Dr. Mark Schaub, Chief International Officer at the Padnos International Center at Grand Valley State University. Entrance fee is $10; open to the public. 
  • Community African dance class—7:30 to 8:30 p.m. at the Rootead Enrichment Center, 1501 Fulford St., Kalamazoo, hosted by Rootead. This community class which focuses on African dance encourages the entire family to attend. First class is always free, $10 for non-members; open to the public. 

Thursday, Oct. 5

  • CELCIS conversation circle (women only)—2 to 3 p.m. in the 4th floor reception area of Ellsworth Hall, hosted by the Center for English Language and Culture for International Students. Join students learning English in relaxed conversation about local and social topics. Free and open to women in the public. 
  • "Water Issues Under Climate Change: Opportunities and Challenges in China" presentation—3:30 p.m. in 2119 Wood Hall, hosted by the Visiting Scholars and Artists Program and the Department of Geography. The presentation will be given by Dr. Xu Zongxue, professor and deputy dean of the College of Water Sciences at Beijing Normal University and director of the Beijing Key Laboratory of Urban Hydrological Cycle and Sponge City Technology. Free and open to the public. 

Friday, Oct. 6

  • International Ladies Sports Club—2 to 3 p.m. at the Student Recreation Center, hosted by International Student Activities. Bond with women from all over the world through sports and exercise. Free and open to all women in the community. 

Saturday, Oct. 7

  • China Festival—noon to 5 p.m. in the Student Recreation Center, hosted by the Haenicke Institute for Global Education, the Confucius Institute at WMU and others. The event features dance and music performances, a badminton tournament, hands-on activities, a Chinese art exhibition and informational display booths about Chinese culture. Free and open to the public. 

Monday, Oct. 9

  • CELCIS conversation circle—2 to 3 p.m. in the 4th floor reception area of Ellsworth Hall, hosted by the Center for English Language and Culture for International Students. Join students learning English in relaxed conversation about local and social topics. Free and open to the public.
  • Afro-modern dance class—5:15 to 6:15 p.m. at the Rootead Enrichment Center, 1501 Fulford St., Kalamazoo, hosted by Rootead and Dancemakers Initiative. Join the class to learn about the basic Katherine Dunham technique which combines African and Caribbean styles of movement. First class is always free, $10 for non-members; open to the public.
  • "The Resilience Factor" talk—6 p.m. in Trimpe Hall Multicultural Center, hosted by Foundation Scholars, Seita Scholars and the Division of Multicultural Affairs. The talk will be given by Dr. Tran-Davies, a medical doctor in Canada who was a refugee of Vietnam in her childhood. Free and open to the public. 

Tuesday, Oct. 10

  • Real Talk Diversity Series: "Surpassing Certainty"—11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. in the Multicultural Center in the Adrian Trimpe Building, hosted by the Office of Diversity and Inclusion. Join a discussion of "Surpassing Certainty" by Janet Mock facilitated by Natalie Nguyen, director of the Office for Lesbian, Bisexual, Gay and Transgender Student Services, and Lindsay Palar, program coordinator for the Office of Diversity and Inclusion. Lunch and copies of the book will be provided to a limited number of registered participants; free and open to the public.
  • CELCIS conversation circle—2 to 3 p.m. in the 4th floor reception area of Ellsworth Hall, hosted by the Center for English Language and Culture for International Students. Join students learning English in relaxed conversation about local and social topics. Free and open to the public.
  • Mesa Española—4 to 5 p.m. in the Brown Hall lobby, hosted by the Department of Spanish. Practice Spanish with other students and native Spanish speakers. Refreshments provided; free and open to the public. 

Wednesday, Oct. 11

  • Local Global Market—10 to 2 p.m. in front of Sangren Hall, hosted by International Student Activities. Area farmers will bring fresh fruits and produce to campus for purchase. Email wayne.l.bond@wmich.edu for questions. Free and open to the public.
  • Lyceum Lecture Series: "National Coming Out Day: Trans and Immigrant Rights in the Fight for Liberation"—noon to 1 p.m. in the Lee Honors College Lounge, hosted by the Lee Honors College and the Arcus Center for Social Justice Leadership at Kalamazoo College. The lecture will be led by Jennicet Guteirrez, founding member of La Familia: Trans Queer Liberation Movement. Free and open to the public.
  • CELCIS conversation circle—2 to 3 p.m. in the 4th floor reception area of Ellsworth Hall, hosted by the Center for English Language and Culture for International Students. Join students learning English in relaxed conversation about local and social topics. Free and open to the public.
  • Mesa Española—3 to 4 p.m. in the Brown Hall lobby, hosted by the Department of Spanish. Practice Spanish with other students and native Spanish speakers. Refreshments provided; free and open to the public.
  • Western World Cup—2 to 6 p.m. at the WMU Student Recreation Center, hosted by International Student Activites and Intramural Sports. Mark your calendars for the soccer face-off of the year as teams around campus and in the community compete for the title of Western World Cup Champions. Register to play by emailing intl-actassist@wmich.edu.
  • Community African dance class—7:30 to 8:30 p.m. at the Rootead Enrichment Center, 1501 Fulford St., Kalamazoo, hosted by Rootead. This community class which focuses on African dance encourages the entire family to attend. First class is always free, $10 for non-members; open to the public. 

Thursday, Oct. 12

  • CELCIS conversation circle (women only)—2 to 3 p.m. in the 4th floor reception area of Ellsworth Hall, hosted by the Center for English Language and Culture for International Students. Join students learning English in relaxed conversation about local and social topics. Free and open to women in the public. 
  • "Immigrant to Neighbor: Journeying through Hope and Fear" panel—7 p.m. in the Brown & Gold Room of the Bernhard Center, hosted by the Study of Ethics in Society. The panel features readings from the recently published anthology Immigration & Justice for Our Neighbors. Free and open to the public. 

Friday, Oct. 13

  • "Water resources and water conservation policies in the Arabian Gulf Region" lecture—3 to 4 p.m. in 1118 Rood Hall, hosted by the Department of Geosciences. The lecture will be given by Dr. Ahmed Murad, dean of the College of Science and professor of hydrogeology at the United Arab Emirates University. Free and open to the public.
  • Japanese Conversation Table—4 to 5 p.m. in the Bernhard Center Cafeteria, hosted by the Soga Japan Center. The conversation table is a free opportunity to practice Japanese language skills. Registration required; free and open to the public. 

Saturday, Oct. 14

  • Parade of Flags Homecoming Event—3 to 3:30 p.m. at Waldo Stadium, hosted by International Student Activities and the Haenicke Institute for Global Education. Don't miss the homecoming tradition that displays the University's international diversity. Register to volunteer by emailing intl-specialprojects@wmich.edu; open to the public. 
  • Hispanic Heritage Month homecoming alumni gathering—1:30 to 3:30 p.m. in the College of Health and Human Services Tailgate lot, East Campus, hosted by the Division of Multicultural Affairs. Join as alumni gather to reconnect and share stories of their experiences while students. Food provided; free and open to the public. 
  • "Break the Chain" film screening—6:30 p.m. at the Westminister Presbyterian Church, 1515 Helen Ave., Portage, hosted by the Westminister Presbyterian Church and the Kalamazoo Anti-Human Trafficking Coalition. The film highlights the truth behind human trafficking in Michigan. Free and open to the public.

Monday, Oct. 16

  • CELCIS conversation circle—2 to 3 p.m. in the 4th floor reception area of Ellsworth Hall, hosted by the Center for English Language and Culture for International Students. Join students learning English in relaxed conversation about local and social topics. Free and open to the public.
  • "Andean Uplift and the Evolution of South American Climate and Hydrology" seminar—4 p.m. in 1118 Rood Hall, hosted by the Department of Geosciences. The seminar will feature Dr. Chris Poulsen, chair and professor of the Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences at the University of Michigan. Free and open to the public. 
  • Afro-modern dance class—5:15 to 6:15 p.m. at the Rootead Enrichment Center, 1501 Fulford St., Kalamazoo, hosted by Rootead and Dancemakers Initiative. Join the class to learn about the basic Katherine Dunham technique which combines African and Caribbean styles of movement. First class is always free, $10 for non-members; open to the public.

Tuesday, Oct. 17

  • CELCIS conversation circle—2 to 3 p.m. in the 4th floor reception area of Ellsworth Hall, hosted by the Center for English Language and Culture for International Students. Join students learning English in relaxed conversation about local and social topics. Free and open to the public.
  • Mesa Española—4 to 5 p.m. in the Brown Hall lobby, hosted by the Department of Spanish. Practice Spanish with other students and native Spanish speakers. Refreshments provided; free and open to the public. 

  • Ethics Book Club: "The Left Hand of Darkness"—6 p.m. at the Central City Tap House, 359 S. Kalamazoo Mall, hosted by the Center for the Study of Ethics and Society. Join a discussion of "The Left Hand of Darkness" by Ursula LeGuin led by John Minser, curriculum coordinator at the WMU Homer Stryker M.D. School of Medicine. Registration required; free and open to the public.
  • "The Middle East: Regional Shifts and Global Responses" lecture—7 to 8:30 p.m. at the WMU Beltline Campus, 2333 E. Beltline Ave. S.E., Grand Rapids, hosted by the World Affairs Council of Western Michigan. The lecture will be given by Reza Marashi, research director for the National Iranian American Council. Entrance is $15; open to the public. 

Wednesday, Oct. 18

  • Local Global Market—10 to 2 p.m. in front of Sangren Hall, hosted by International Student Activities. Area farmers will bring fresh fruits and produce to campus for purchase. Email wayne.l.bond@wmich.edu for questions. Free and open to the public.
  • Lyceum Lecture Series: "Beyond Binaries: Identity and Sexuality"—noon to 1 p.m. in the Lee Honors College Lounge, hosted by the Lee Honors College. The lecture will be led by Robyn Ochs, educator, speaker, grassroots activist and editor of Bi Women Quarterly. Free and open to the public.
  • "Journey to the West: the True Story of Xuanzang (602-664)" talk—noon in 205 Bernhard Center, hosted by the Timothy Light Center for Chinese Studies, the Department of History, the Confucius Institute at WMU and the Haenicke Institute for Global Education. The talk will be given by Dr. Victor Cunrui Xiong, professor of history and a recipient of the WMU Distinguished Faculty Scholar Award. Free and open to the public. 
  • CELCIS conversation circle—2 to 3 p.m. in the 4th floor reception area of Ellsworth Hall, hosted by the Center for English Language and Culture for International Students. Join students learning English in relaxed conversation about local and social topics. Free and open to the public.
  • Mesa Española—3 to 4 p.m. in the Brown Hall lobby, hosted by the Department of Spanish. Practice Spanish with other students and native Spanish speakers. Refreshments provided; free and open to the public.
  • Queer People of Color Discussion—5:30 to 7 p.m. in 1321 Trimpe Building, hosted by LGBT Student Services. This is a bi-monthly social group created for people of color by other queer people of color. Light refreshments provided; free and open to the public. 
  • Community African dance class—7:30 to 8:30 p.m. at the Rootead Enrichment Center, 1501 Fulford St., Kalamazoo, hosted by Rootead. This community class which focuses on African dance encourages the entire family to attend. First class is always free, $10 for non-members; open to the public. 

Thursday, Oct. 19

  • CELCIS conversation circle (women only)—2 to 3 p.m. in the 4th floor reception area of Ellsworth Hall, hosted by the Center for English Language and Culture for International Students. Join students learning English in relaxed conversation about local and social topics. Free and open to women in the public. 
  • Speaker: Immaculée Ilibagiza—7 p.m. at the Miller Auditorium. Immaculée Ilibagiza will talk about her experience as a a survivor of the 1994 Rwandan genocide that took the lives of nearly one million Tutsis. Tickets start at $10; open to the public. 

Friday, Oct. 20

  • "Anti-Racist classroom Pedagogies: A Response to Charlottesville" workshop—noon to 1:30 p.m. in UCC 2033, hosted by the Office of Faculty Development. This installment of the Teaching Inclusivity Series will be presented by Dr. Gwen Tarbox, associate professor of English. Registration required; open to faculty, graduate students, administrators and administrative staff. 
  • Japanese Conversation Table—4 to 5 p.m. in the Bernhard Center Cafeteria, hosted by the Soga Japan Center. The conversation table is a free opportunity to practice Japanese language skills. Registration required; free and open to the public. 

Monday, Oct. 23

  • CELCIS conversation circle—2 to 3 p.m. in the 4th floor reception area of Ellsworth Hall, hosted by the Center for English Language and Culture for International Students. Join students learning English in relaxed conversation about local and social topics. Free and open to the public.
  • Afro-modern dance class—5:15 to 6:15 p.m. at the Rootead Enrichment Center, 1501 Fulford St., Kalamazoo, hosted by Rootead and Dancemakers Initiative. Join the class to learn about the basic Katherine Dunham technique which combines African and Caribbean styles of movement. First class is always free, $10 for non-members; open to the public.

Tuesday, Oct. 24

  • CELCIS conversation circle—2 to 3 p.m. in the 4th floor reception area of Ellsworth Hall, hosted by the Center for English Language and Culture for International Students. Join students learning English in relaxed conversation about local and social topics. Free and open to the public.
  • Mesa Española—4 to 5 p.m. in the Brown Hall lobby, hosted by the Department of Spanish. Practice Spanish with other students and native Spanish speakers. Refreshments provided; free and open to the public. 

  • Ethics Book Club: "The Left Hand of Darkness"—6 p.m. at the Central City Tap House, 359 S. Kalamazoo Mall, hosted by the Center for the Study of Ethics and Society. Join a discussion of "The Left Hand of Darkness" by Ursula LeGuin led by John Minser, curriculum coordinator at the WMU Homer Stryker M.D. School of Medicine. Registration required; free and open to the public. 

Wednesday, Oct. 25

  • Local Global Market—10 to 2 p.m. in front of Sangren Hall, hosted by International Student Activities. Area farmers will bring fresh fruits and produce to campus for purchase. Email wayne.l.bond@wmich.edu for questions. Free and open to the public.
  • Lyceum Lecture Series: "Intersectional Coalition Building"—noon to 1 p.m. in the Lee Honors College Lounge, hosted by the Lee Honors College. The lecture will be led by Romeo Jackson, graduate student at the University of Utah. Free and open to the public.
  • Werner Sichel Lecture Series: "Income Inequality, Progressive Taxation and Tax Expenditures"—noon to 1:15 p.m. in 2028 Brown Hall, hosted by the Department of Economics. The lecture will be presented by James Hines Jr., professor of economics and law at the University of Michigan. Free and open to the public. 
  • CELCIS conversation circle—2 to 3 p.m. in the 4th floor reception area of Ellsworth Hall, hosted by the Center for English Language and Culture for International Students. Join students learning English in relaxed conversation about local and social topics. Free and open to the public.
  • Mesa Española—3 to 4 p.m. in the Brown Hall lobby, hosted by the Department of Spanish. Practice Spanish with other students and native Spanish speakers. Refreshments provided; free and open to the public.
  • Community African dance class—7:30 to 8:30 p.m. at the Rootead Enrichment Center, 1501 Fulford St., Kalamazoo, hosted by Rootead. This community class which focuses on African dance encourages the entire family to attend. First class is always free, $10 for non-members; open to the public. 

Thursday, Oct. 26

  • CELCIS conversation circle (women only)2 to 3 p.m. in the 4th floor reception area of Ellsworth Hall, hosted by the Center for English Language and Culture for International Students. Join students learning English in relaxed conversation about local and social topics. Free and open to women in the public. 
  • "The Road to Art is to promote the spiritual civilization of mankind" public lecture4 p.m. in 4705 Sangren, hosted by the Confucius Institute at WMU. The lecture will be given by Zhaowei Jiang, figure painting artist and art educator with outstanding achievements in China in the 20th century. Free and open to the public. 
  • Real Talk Diversity Series: "Disability at the Intersections"6 to 8 p.m. in the Multicultural Center in the Adrian Trimpe Building, hosted by the Office of Diversity and Inclusion. Facilitators from Disability Services for Students will explire the social model of disability, the language used around disability and how to identify and challenge one's own implicit biases. Refreshments provided; free and open to the public. 
  • "Silver Spoon" Japanese film screening—7 p.m. in 3508 Knauss Hall, hosted by the Soga Japan Center and the Japan Foundation. This film depicts the life of a city-bred boy who finds himself at a rural high school in Obihiro, Hokkaido, Japan. Free and open the public. 

Friday, Oct. 27

  • International Ladies Sports Club—2 to 3 p.m. at the Student Recreation Center, hosted by International Student Activities. Bond with women from all over the world through sports and exercise. Free and open to all women in the community. 
  • Japanese Conversation Table—4 to 5 p.m. in the Bernhard Center Cafeteria, hosted by the Soga Japan Center. The conversation table is a free opportunity to practice Japanese language skills. Registration required; free and open to the public. 

Saturday, Oct. 28

  • "There is No Lid on the Sea" Japanese film screening—2 p.m. in 3508 Knauss Hall, hosted by the Soga Japan Center and the Japan Foundation. This drama was adapted from a Japanese novel and depicts a woman exhausted by city life who opens a shop selling snow cones in the small town that she grew up in. Free and open to the public. 

Monday, Oct. 30

  • CELCIS conversation circle—2 to 3 p.m. in the 4th floor reception area of Ellsworth Hall, hosted by the Center for English Language and Culture for International Students. Join students learning English in relaxed conversation about local and social topics. Free and open to the public.
  • "Know Before You Go" student panel and information session—4 to 5:30 p.m. in the Trimpe Multicultural Center, hosted by Study Abroad and Financial Aid. WMU students will share study abroad experiences and the steps to financially plan to study abroad. Free and open to the public. 
  • "Statistical analysis of soil moisture impacts on climate extremes" seminar—4 p.m. in 1118 Rood Hall hosted by the Department of Geosciences and the Institute of the Environment and Sustainability. The seminar will be given by Dr. Lei Meng, assistant professor of geography. Free and open to the public. 
  • Afro-modern dance class—5:15 to 6:15 p.m. at the Rootead Enrichment Center, 1501 Fulford St., Kalamazoo, hosted by Rootead and Dancemakers Initiative. Join the class to learn about the basic Katherine Dunham technique which combines African and Caribbean styles of movement. First class is always free, $10 for non-members; open to the public.

Tuesday, Oct. 31

  • CELCIS conversation circle—2 to 3 p.m. in the Bernhard Center Bronco Global Lounge, hosted by the Center for English Language and Culture for International Students. Join students learning English in relaxed conversation about local and social topics. Free and open to the public.
  • Mesa Española—4 to 5 p.m. in the Brown Hall lobby, hosted by the Department of Spanish. Practice Spanish with other students and native Spanish speakers. Refreshments provided; free and open to the public. 

September 2017

Friday, Sept. 1

  • Volunteer at International Orientation—all day Aug. 28 to Sept. 1 on the WMU campus, hosted by International Admissions and Services and International Student Activities. Students, staff, faculty and community members are invited to help welcome new international students to campus during International Orientation. Sign up required be emailing intl-activities@wmich.edu
  • Registration opens for Chinese Culture Classes—Sept. 1 to 25, hosted by the Confucius Institute at WMU. The Confucius Institute offers Chinese culture classes that are open to WMU faculty, staff, students and the public. Half-price discount is available for WMU students and senior citizens (55 and above); open to the public. 

Saturday, Sept. 2

  • Rootead Pop-Up Thrift Shop and World Bazaar—10 a.m. to 7 p.m. at Rootead, 1501 Fulford St., Kalamazoo, hosted by Rootead. Rootead will be selling donated worldly clothing, art, jewelry, home decor, food, drums and bath products. Free and open to the public. 

Tuesday, Sept. 5

  • Discovery Webinar Series: "International Opportunities with Cultural Vistas"—2 to 3:30 p.m. in Walwood Hall, hosted by WMU Research. The webinar will be led by Ruth Conkling, program officer for Cultural Vistas. For WMU faculty and research staff; no registration required. 

Friday, Sept. 8 

  • Fall 2017 Welcome Party for international students—1 to 3 p.m. at the Goldsworth Valley Ponds, hosted by International Student Activities. Join International Student Activities in welcoming international students to the WMU campus and helping them navigate Bronco Bash. Food and beverages provided; free and open to the public. 

Saturday, Sept. 9

  • Fall Fab Fest—3 to 6 p.m. at the Multicultural Center in Trimpe Hall, hosted by the Lesbian, Bisexual, Gay and Transgender Student Services. Come and learn about the Harlem Ball and house tradition that gave rise to popular drag culture of the LGBTQ+ community. Food provided; free and open to the public. 
  • St. Mary Polish Night—5 to 10 p.m. at Father Bartkowiak Hall, 939 Charlotte Ave., Kalamazoo, hosted by the St. Mary Catholic Church. The event will feature Polish culture, entertainment and food. Admission is free, various food pricing options; open to the public. 

Monday, Sept. 11

  • Japanese Conversation Table—2 to 3 p.m. in the Bernhard Center, hosted by the Soga Japan Center. The conversation table provides a free opportunities to practice your Japanese language skills with students from Takasaki City University of Economics. Registration required; open to Japanese speakers and language learners. 

Tuesday, Sept. 12

  • "The Culture of Political Monuments in the Ukraine Today: from Soviet Heritage to Post Modernity" lecture—4 p.m. in 2500 Knauss Hall, hosted by the Department of History. The lecture will be give by Professor Thomas Wünsch, chair in modern and contemporary history of East Europe at the University of Passau, Germany. Reception to follow; free and open to the public. 
  • Mesa Española—4 to 5 p.m. in the Brown Hall lobby, hosted by the Department of Spanish. Practice Spanish with other students and native Spanish speakers. Refreshments provided; free and open to the public. 

  • "American Foreign Policy in a Time of Fractured Politics" presentation—5:30 to 7:15 p.m. at the University Club, 111 Lyon Street N.W., Grand Rapids, hosted by the World Affairs Council of Western Michigan. The presentation will be given by Colonel Philip J. (P.J.) Crowley, former assistant secretay for public affairs. Cost if $15; open to the public. 
  • Tibetan Buddhist meditation/study group—7:15 to 8:30 p.m. at Sanctuary Yoga, 1919 Stearns Ave., Kalamazoo, hosted by Western Michigan Jewel Heart. Explore in a practical way the practices associated with Tibetan Buddhism, including concentration, mindfulness, analysis and visualization. Free and open to the public. 

Wednesday, Sept. 13

  • Local Global Market—10 to 2 p.m. in front of Sangren Hall, hosted by International Student Activities. Area farmers will bring fresh fruits and produce to campus for purchase. Email wayne.l.bond@wmich.edu for questions. Free and open to the public.
  • Lyceum Lecture Series: "Building Intersectional Awareness"—noon to 1 p.m. in the Lee Honors College Lounge, hosted by the Lee Honors College. The lecture will be led by Natalie Nguyen, director of WMU's LBGT Student Services. Free and open to the public.
  • Werner Sichel Lecture Series: "The Political Economy of Retirement Time Inequality, in the Economic Cooperation and Organization Development (OECD)"—noon to 1:15 p.m. in 2028 Brown Hall, hosted by the Department of Economics. The lecture will be presented by Dr. Teresa Ghilarducci, professor and chair in economic policy analysis at The New School. Free and open to the public. 
  • Mesa Española—3 to 4 p.m. in the Brown Hall lobby, hosted by the Department of Spanish. Practice Spanish with other students and native Spanish speakers. Refreshments provided; free and open to the public.

Thursday, Sept. 14

  • "La Jeune Fille Sans Mains (The Girl Without Hands)" showing—12:30 p.m. at Celebration! Cinema Crossroads, 6600 Ring Road, Portage, hosted by the Kalamazoo Film Society. Don't miss the animated adaptation of the Brothers Grimm fairy tale of the same name. Admission is $7; open to the public. 
  • Global and International Studies Program Fall Welcome—3:30 to 5 p.m. in 2041 Moore Hall, hosted by the Global and International Studies program. Join global and international studies for a "Shay-Buna" (afternoon tea-coffee) to kick off the fall semester. Refreshments provided; free and open to the public. 
  • "China's Emerging Role in Global Agriculture" lecture—4 p.m. in 1028 Brown Hall, hosted by the Timothy Light Center for Chinese Studies. The lecture will be give by Dr. Fred Gale, senior economist for the U.S. Department of Agriculture. Free and open to the public.
  • Hispanic Heritage Month music celebration—6:30 to 8:30 p.m. at the Center Stage in the Bronco Mall of the Bernhard Center, hosted by Multicultural Affairs. The event is a kickoff to the celebration of Hispanic Heritage Month and will feature musical from Spain and Latin America. Free and open to the public. 
  • "Our Fires Still Burn" film screening—6:30 p.m. at the Kalamazoo Institute of Arts, 314 S. Park St., Kalamazoo, hosted by the Kalamazoo Institute of Arts. The film invites viewers into the lives of contemporary Native Americans living in the Midwest. Free with museum admission; open to the public. 
  • "Trip to Spain" showing—9:15 p.m. at Celebration! Cinema Crossroads, 6600 Ring Road, Portage, hosted by the Kalamazoo Film Society. Don't miss this comedy which portrays Steve Coogan and Rob Brydon playing versions of themselves as they travel around Spain sampling sites and restaurants. Admission is $7; open to the public. 

Friday, Sept. 15

  • Welcoming Michigan Statewide Convening—8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. at Washtenaw Community College, 4800 E. Huron River Drive, Ann Arbor, hosted by Welcoming Michigan. Join the 4th annual gathering of community members and municipial partners to learn from each other and share promising practices around immigrant integration. Registration starts at $30; open to the public. 
  • "China's Pork Industry: A Globalization Story" talk—noon in 204 Bernhard Center, hosted by the Timothy Light Center for Chinese Studies, the Department of Geography, the Department of Economics, the Confucius Institute at WMU, the Food and Consumer Packaged Goods Marketing program and the Haenicke Institute for Global Education. The talk will be give by Dr. Fred Gale, senior economist for the U.S. Department of Agriculture.  Free and open to the public.
  • "Trip to Spain" showing—12:30 p.m. at Celebration! Cinema Crossroads, 6600 Ring Road, Portage, hosted by the Kalamazoo Film Society. Don't miss this comedy which portrays Steve Coogan and Rob Brydon playing versions of themselves as they travel around Spain sampling sites and restaurants. Admission is $7; open to the public. 
  • "La Jeune Fille Sans Mains (The Girl Without Hands)" showing—3:30 p.m. at Celebration! Cinema Crossroads, 6600 Ring Road, Portage, hosted by the Kalamazoo Film Society. Don't miss the animated adaptation of the Brothers Grimm fairy tale of the same name. Admission is $7; open to the public. 

Saturday, Sept. 16

  • International Student Activities travels to Saugatuck—9:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. in Saugatuck, hosted by International Student Activities. Join International Student Activities in teaching the importance and fun of our Lake Michigan beaches. Registration required at intl-activities@wmich.edu; $10 registration includes transportation and lunch. Open to the public. 
  • Kalamazoo Hispanic Fiesta—11 a.m. to 9 p.m. in Bronson Park, 200 S. Rose St., Kalamazoo, hosted by the Division of Multicultural Affairs and Despierta Kalamazoo. The fiesta will include a variety of musical performances, food for purchase and games. Free and open to the public.  
  • "La Jeune Fille Sans Mains (The Girl Without Hands)" showing—12:30 p.m. at Celebration! Cinema Crossroads, 6600 Ring Road, Portage, hosted by the Kalamazoo Film Society. Don't miss the animated adaptation of the Brothers Grimm fairy tale of the same name. Admission is $7; open to the public. 
  • "Trip to Spain" showing—9:15 p.m. at Celebration! Cinema Crossroads, 6600 Ring Road, Portage, hosted by the Kalamazoo Film Society. Don't miss this comedy which portrays Steve Coogan and Rob Brydon playing versions of themselves as they travel around Spain sampling sites and restaurants. Admission is $7; open to the public. 

Sunday, Sept. 17

  • "Our People, Our Land, Our Images" gallery tour—2 to 3 p.m. at the Kalamazoo Institute of Arts, 314 S. Park St., Kalamazoo, hosted by the Kalamazoo Institute of Arts. Join a docent-led tour of the exhibit which includes 51 works by 26 indigenous photgraphers from Canada, Iraq, New Zealand and the U.S. Free with museum admission; open to the public. 
  • "Trip to Spain" showing—6:30 p.m. at Celebration! Cinema Crossroads, 6600 Ring Road, Portage, hosted by the Kalamazoo Film Society. Don't miss this comedy which portrays Steve Coogan and Rob Brydon playing versions of themselves as they travel around Spain sampling sites and restaurants. Admission is $7; open to the public. 
  • "La Jeune Fille Sans Mains (The Girl Without Hands)" showing—9:15 p.m. at Celebration! Cinema Crossroads, 6600 Ring Road, Portage, hosted by the Kalamazoo Film Society. Don't miss the animated adaptation of the Brothers Grimm fairy tale of the same name. Admission is $7; open to the public. 

Monday, Sept. 18

  • CELCIS conversation circle—2 to 3 p.m. in the 4th floor reception area of Ellsworth Hall, hosted by the Center for English Language and Culture for International Students. Join students learning English in relaxed conversation about local and social topics. Free and open to the public.
  • "Trip to Spain" showing—3:30 p.m. at Celebration! Cinema Crossroads, 6600 Ring Road, Portage, hosted by the Kalamazoo Film Society. Don't miss this comedy which portrays Steve Coogan and Rob Brydon playing versions of themselves as they travel around Spain sampling sites and restaurants. Admission is $7; open to the public. 
  • Multicultural Meet and Greet—6 to 9 p.m. on the second floor of the Bernhard Center, hosted by the Division of Multicultural Affairs. The event offers opportunities to build relationships with students of color, connect with multicultural RSO's, hear success stories from faculty and alumni of color and learn about local resources. Free and open to the public. 
  • "La Jeune Fille Sans Mains (The Girl Without Hands)" showing—6:30 p.m. at Celebration! Cinema Crossroads, 6600 Ring Road, Portage, hosted by the Kalamazoo Film Society. Don't miss the animated adaptation of the Brothers Grimm fairy tale of the same name. Admission is $7; open to the public. 

Tuesday, Sept. 19

  • "Dancing for My Tribe: Potawatomi Tradition in Modern Times" ARTbreak—noon at the Kalamazoo Institute of Arts, 314 S. Park St., Kalamazoo, hosted by the Kalamazoo Institute of Arts. A Tribal Member of Citizen Potawatomi Nation, Sharon Hoogstraten, describes her 5-year photographic portrait of Potawatomi Native Americans. Free and open to the public.
  • "Trip to Spain" showing—12:30 p.m. at Celebration! Cinema Crossroads, 6600 Ring Road, Portage, hosted by the Kalamazoo Film Society. Don't miss this comedy which portrays Steve Coogan and Rob Brydon playing versions of themselves as they travel around Spain sampling sites and restaurants. Admission is $7; open to the public. 
  • Ice cream social with international students—2 to 4 p.m. at Kanley Chapel, hosted by International Student Activities. Join international students for ice cream, raffles and games. Free and open to the public.
  • CELCIS conversation circle—2 to 3 p.m. in the 4th floor reception area of Ellsworth Hall, hosted by the Center for English Language and Culture for International Students. Join students learning English in relaxed conversation about local and social topics. Free and open to the public.
  • "La Jeune Fille Sans Mains (The Girl Without Hands)" showing—3:30 p.m. at Celebration! Cinema Crossroads, 6600 Ring Road, Portage, hosted by the Kalamazoo Film Society. Don't miss the animated adaptation of the Brothers Grimm fairy tale of the same name. Admission is $7; open to the public. 
  • Mesa Española—4 to 5 p.m. in the Brown Hall lobby, hosted by the Department of Spanish. Practice Spanish with other students and native Spanish speakers. Refreshments provided; free and open to the public. 

  • "Understanding China Through Music" concert—7 to 9 p.m. at Loy Norrix High School, 606 E. Kilgore Rd., Kalamazoo, hosted by the Confucius Institute at WMU. The concert is part of the celebration of the 8th anniversary of the Confucius Institute that will be performed by a new fusion band featuring Chinese and American hammered dulcimers. Tickets are $15; open to the public. 
  • Tibetan Buddhist meditation/study group—7:15 to 8:30 p.m. at Sanctuary Yoga, 1919 Stearns Ave., Kalamazoo, hosted by Western Michigan Jewel Heart. Explore in a practical way the practices associated with Tibetan Buddhism, including concentration, mindfulness, analysis and visualization. Free and open to the public. 
  • Garba dancing night—7:30 to 9  p.m. at the Rootead Dance Studio, 1501 Fulford Avenue, Kalamazoo, hosted by the Kalamazoo Garba Club. Join the Kalamazoo Garba Club for a pop-up dance night to learn and practice the traditional folk dance from India. Entrance is $3; open to the public.

Wednesday, Sept. 20

  • Local Global Market—10 to 2 p.m. in front of Sangren Hall, hosted by International Student Activities. Area farmers will bring fresh fruits and produce to campus for purchase. Email wayne.l.bond@wmich.edu for questions. Free and open to the public.
  • Lyceum Lecture Series: "Legal Issues for the LGTQ+ Community"—noon to 1 p.m. in the Lee Honors College Lounge, hosted by the Lee Honors College. The lecture will be led by Jay Kaplan, director of the ACLU Michigan LGBT Project, and Frank Aielle, professor of law at the WMU Cooley Law School. Free and open to the public.
  • "La Jeune Fille Sans Mains (The Girl Without Hands)" showing—12:30 p.m. at Celebration! Cinema Crossroads, 6600 Ring Road, Portage, hosted by the Kalamazoo Film Society. Don't miss the animated adaptation of the Brothers Grimm fairy tale of the same name. Admission is $7; open to the public. 
  • CELCIS conversation circle—2 to 3 p.m. in the 4th floor reception area of Ellsworth Hall, hosted by the Center for English Language and Culture for International Students. Join students learning English in relaxed conversation about local and social topics. Free and open to the public.
  • Mesa Española—3 to 4 p.m. in the Brown Hall lobby, hosted by the Department of Spanish. Practice Spanish with other students and native Spanish speakers. Refreshments provided; free and open to the public.
  • Ethics Book Club: "Black and Blue: the Origins and Consequences of Medical Racism"—6 p.m. in the WMed Information Commons, hosted by The Center for the Study of Ethics and Society. Join a discussion of "Black and Blue: the Origins and Consequences of Medical Racism" by John Hoberman led by Keagan Potts, a master's degree student in philosophy. Registration required; free and open to the public. 
  • "Salam Neighbor" documentary screening—7 to 9 p.m. in 1710 Sangren Hall, hosted by Welcoming Michigan and Refugee Outreach Collective. The award winning documentary shares the stories of our refugee neighbors with the dignity they deserve and the depth the world needs. Donations welcome; free and open to the public. 
  • "Trip to Spain" showing—9:15 p.m. at Celebration! Cinema Crossroads, 6600 Ring Road, Portage, hosted by the Kalamazoo Film Society. Don't miss this comedy which portrays Steve Coogan and Rob Brydon playing versions of themselves as they travel around Spain sampling sites and restaurants. Admission is $7; open to the public. 

Thursday, Sept. 21

  • CELCIS conversation circle (women only)—2 to 3 p.m. in the 4th floor reception area of Ellsworth Hall, hosted by the Center for English Language and Culture for International Students. Join students learning English in relaxed conversation about local and social topics. Free and open to women in the public. 
  • "To the People, Food is Heaven: Politics and Quotidian Life in Recent Chinese History" lecture—4:30 p.m. in 1028 Brown Hall, hosted by the Timothy Light Center for Chinese Studies. The lecture will be given by Dr. Hanchao Lu, professor of history at the Georgia Institute of Technology. Free and open to the public. 
  • Alma Latina 40 years celebration—4:30 to 6 p.m. at the WMUK-FM studio, hosted by the Division of Multicultural Affairs. The reception will celebrate 40 years of the Alma Latina radio program, the longest Spanish-language radio show in the Kalamazoo area. Free and open to the public. 
  • "Trip to Spain" showing—6:30 p.m. at Celebration! Cinema Crossroads, 6600 Ring Road, Portage, hosted by the Kalamazoo Film Society. Don't miss this comedy which portrays Steve Coogan and Rob Brydon playing versions of themselves as they travel around Spain sampling sites and restaurants. Admission is $7; open to the public. 
  • "La Jeune Fille Sans Mains (The Girl Without Hands)" showing—9:15 p.m. at Celebration! Cinema Crossroads, 6600 Ring Road, Portage, hosted by the Kalamazoo Film Society. Don't miss the animated adaptation of the Brothers Grimm fairy tale of the same name. Admission is $7; open to the public. 

Friday, Sept. 22

  • "Crossing the 1949 Dividing Line: A New Trend in the Study of Modern China" talk—noon in 204 Bernhard Center, hosted by the Timothy Light Center for Chinese Studies, the Department of History, the Confucius Institute at WMU and the Haenicke Institute for Global Education. The lecture will be given by Dr. Hanchao Lu, director of the China Research Center in Atlanta and professor of history at the Georgia Institute of Technology. Free and open to the public.
  • International Ladies Sports Club—2 to 3 p.m. at the Student Recreation Center, hosted by International Student Activities. Bond with women from all over the world through sports and exercise. Free and open to all women in the community. 

Sunday, Sept. 24

  • "Women Warriors" Portraits by Hung Liu" gallery tour—2 to 3 p.m. at the Kalamazoo Institute of Arts, 314 S. Park St., Kalamazoo, hosted by the Kalamazoo Institute of Arts. Join a docent-led tour of the exhibit which presents visions of determined, strong and beautiful warriors "fragmentary glimpses of unknown women, enveloped within new lives of beauty and dignity." Free with museum admission; open to the public. 

Monday, Sept. 25

  • CELCIS conversation circle—2 to 3 p.m. in the 4th floor reception area of Ellsworth Hall, hosted by the Center for English Language and Culture for International Students. Join students learning English in relaxed conversation about local and social topics. Free and open to the public.
  • Afro-modern dance class—5:15 to 6:15 p.m. at the Rootead Enrichment Center, 1501 Fulford St., Kalamazoo, hosted by Rootead and Dancemakers Initiative. Join the class to learn about the basic Katherine Dunham technique which combines African and Caribbean styles of movement. First class is always free, $10 for non-members; open to the public.   
  • Chinese Culture Classes begin—times vary by class, hosted by the Confucius Institute at WMU. The Confucius Institute offers Chinese culture classes that are open to WMU faculty, staff, students and the public. Half-price discount is available for WMU students and senior citizens (55 and above); open to the public. 

Tuesday, Sept. 26

  • Real Talk Diversity Series: "Surpassing Certainty"—11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. in the Multicultural Center in the Adrian Trimpe Building, hosted by the Office of Diversity and Inclusion. Join a discussion of "Surpassing Certainty" by Janet Mock facilitated by Natalie Nguyen, director of the Office for Lesbian, Bisexual, Gay and Transgender Student Services, and Lindsay Palar, program coordinator for the Office of Diversity and Inclusion. Lunch and copies of the book will be provided to a limited number of registered participants; free and open to the public.
  • CELCIS conversation circle—2 to 3 p.m. in the 4th floor reception area of Ellsworth Hall, hosted by the Center for English Language and Culture for International Students. Join students learning English in relaxed conversation about local and social topics. Free and open to the public.
  • Mesa Española—4 to 5 p.m. in the Brown Hall lobby, hosted by the Department of Spanish. Practice Spanish with other students and native Spanish speakers. Refreshments provided; free and open to the public. 

  • Tibetan Buddhist meditation/study group—7:15 to 8:30 p.m. at Sanctuary Yoga, 1919 Stearns Ave., Kalamazoo, hosted by Western Michigan Jewel Heart. Explore in a practical way the practices associated with Tibetan Buddhism, including concentration, mindfulness, analysis and visualization. Free and open to the public. 

Wednesday, Sept. 27

  • WMU Study Abroad Fair—11 a.m. to 3 p.m. in Sangren Hall, hosted by WMU Study Abroad. Attendees will get a chance to speak with WMU students who have studied and interned abroad, WMU professors who coordinate programs and courses abroad and advisors who help guide students in fitting study abroad in to their program of study. Food provided; free and open to the public. 
  • Lyceum Lecture Series: "The Queer Transformation of College Campuses, 1950's to Present"—noon to 1 p.m. in the Lee Honors College Lounge, hosted by the Lee Honors College. The lecture will be led by Dr. Susan Freeman, WMU associate professor and chair of gender and women's studies. Free and open to the public.
  • CELCIS conversation circle—2 to 3 p.m. in the 4th floor reception area of Ellsworth Hall, hosted by the Center for English Language and Culture for International Students. Join students learning English in relaxed conversation about local and social topics. Free and open to the public.
  • Mesa Española—3 to 4 p.m. in the Brown Hall lobby, hosted by the Department of Spanish. Practice Spanish with other students and native Spanish speakers. Refreshments provided; free and open to the public.
  • Community African dance class—7:30 to 8:30 p.m. at the Rootead Enrichment Center, 1501 Fulford St., Kalamazoo, hosted by Rootead. This community class which focuses on African dance encourages the entire family to attend. First class is always free, $10 for non-members; open to the public. 

Thursday, Sept. 28

  • HACU National Internship Program presentation—10 a.m. to 3 p.m. in 204 Bernhard Center, hosted by the Division of Multicultural Affairs. Jonathan D. Santeliz, the national executive director for the Hispanic Association for Colleges and Universities National Internship Program, will present the many opportunities offered by the program. Free and open to the public. 
  • Welcome Reception—2 to 4 p.m. in the Bronco Global Lounge, hosted by the Haenicke Institute for Global Education. Join the Haenicke Institute for Global Education in welcoming Associate Provost Dr. Paulo Zagalo-Melo to WMU. Refreshments provided; free and open to the public. 
  • CELCIS conversation circle (women only)—2 to 3 p.m. in the 4th floor reception area of Ellsworth Hall, hosted by the Center for English Language and Culture for International Students. Join students learning English in relaxed conversation about local and social topics. Free and open to women in the public. 
  • "The Search for Resistance and Reconciliation" talk—6:30 p.m. at the Kalamazoo Institute of Arts, 314 S. Park St., Kalamazoo, hosted by the Kalamazoo Institute of Arts and the Kalamazoo College Department of Art and Art History. Artist Erica Lord will discuss her past and current work that explores displacement, cultural identity and cultural limbo. 
  • The Promise of Education Series: "In Defense of Ideals"—7 p.m. in 3502 Knauss Hall, hosted by the University Center for the Humanities. Join Mark Edmundson as he discusses courage, compassion and wisdom in the works of Homer, the Gospels, Plato and Socrates. Free and open to the public. 
  • "What's Going on with DACA?" panel—7 to 8:30 p.m. in 157 Bernhard Center, hosted by the Global and International Studies Program and the Lewis Walker Institute for the Study of Race and Ethnic Relations. The panel features WMU professors who will be presenting viewpoints about DACA from their respective disciplines. Free and open to the public. 

Friday, Sept. 29

  • International Ladies Sports Club—2 to 3 p.m. at the Student Recreation Center, hosted by International Student Activities. Bond with women from all over the world through sports and exercise. Free and open to all women in the community. 

August 2017

Tuesday, Aug 1

  • CELCIS conversation circle2 to 3 p.m. in the 4th floor reception area of Ellsworth Hall, hosted by the Center for English Language and Culture for International Students. Join students learning English in relaxed conversation about local and social topics. Free and open to the public.
  • Tibetan Buddhist meditation/study group—7:15 to 8:30 p.m. at Sanctuary Yoga, 1919 Stearns Ave., Kalamazoo, hosted by Western Michigan Jewel Heart. Explore in a practical way the practices associated with Tibetan Buddhism, including concentration, mindfulness, analysis and visualization. Free and open to the public. 

Wednesday, Aug 2

  • International Ladies Sports Club—1:30 to 2:30 p.m. at the Student Recreation Center, hosted by International Student Activities. Bond with women from all over the world through sports and exercise. Free and open to all women in the community. 
  • CELCIS conversation circle—2 to 3 p.m. in the 4th floor reception area of Ellsworth Hall, hosted by the Center for English Language and Culture for International Students. Join students learning English in relaxed conversation about local and social topics. Free and open to the public.
  • "Gender equality in science and technology: A new paradigm?" physics forum—6 to 8 p.m. at the Ladies'Library Association, 333 S. Park St., hosted by the Department of Physics. Speakers for the forum include: Dr. Sylvaine Turck-Chieze, president of the Association Femmes & Sciences in France; Jennifer Lentner, senior director of marketing communications at Stryker; and Dr. Carla Koretsky, dean of the WMU College of Arts and Sciences. Free and open to the public. 

Thursday, Aug 3

  • CELCIS conversation circle (women only)—2 to 3 p.m. in the 4th floor reception area of Ellsworth Hall, hosted by the Center for English Language and Culture for International Students. Join students learning English in relaxed conversation about local and social topics. Free and open to women in the public. 

Saturday, Aug 5

  • "Women Warriors: Portraits by Hung Liu" exhibit—daily Aug. 5 to Nov. 26 at the Kalamazoo Institute of Arts, 314 S. Park St., Kalamazoo, hosted by the Kalamazoo Institute of the Arts. The exhibit features the photographic work of Hung Liu that shows the power and perseverance of Chinese women throughout history. Entrance is $5 for adults and $2 with a valid student ID; open to the public. 
  • Kal-Haven biking with CELCIS students—9 to 6 p.m. on the Kal-Haven Trail State Park, 4143 10th St. N., Kalamazoo, hosted by the Center for English Language and Culture for International Students. Join CELCIS in showing international students local culture by riding the famous Kal-Haven bike trail. Free and open to the public; bike rental is $10. 

Monday, Aug 7

  • CELCIS conversation circle—2 to 3 p.m. in the 4th floor reception area of Ellsworth Hall, hosted by the Center for English Language and Culture for International Students. Join students learning English in relaxed conversation about local and social topics. Free and open to the public.

Tuesday, Aug 8

  • CELCIS conversation circle—2 to 3 p.m. in the 4th floor reception area of Ellsworth Hall, hosted by the Center for English Language and Culture for International Students. Join students learning English in relaxed conversation about local and social topics. Free and open to the public.
  • Tibetan Buddhist meditation/study group—7:15 to 8:30 p.m. at Sanctuary Yoga, 1919 Stearns Ave., Kalamazoo, hosted by Western Michigan Jewel Heart. Explore in a practical way the practices associated with Tibetan Buddhism, including concentration, mindfulness, analysis and visualization. Free and open to the public. 

Wednesday, Aug 9

  • CELCIS conversation circle—2 to 3 p.m. in the 4th floor reception area of Ellsworth Hall, hosted by the Center for English Language and Culture for International Students. Join students learning English in relaxed conversation about local and social topics. Free and open to the public.

Thursday, Aug 10

  • End-of-semester party with CELCIS students—1:30 to 3:30 p.m. at the east stairwell entrance of Ellsworth Hall, hosted by the Center for English Language and Culture for International Students. Join CELCIS students, instructors and staff in celebrating a successful semester. Free and open to the public; registration required. 

Saturday, Aug 12

  • Blueberry picking with International Student Activities—11 to 1:30 p.m. at Brookside Farms Fritz's Blueberries, 1475 116th Ave., Otsego, hosted by International Student Activities. Join international students in experiencing one of Michigan's favorite summer pastimes. Registration is $5 and includes transportation; open to the public. 

Monday, Aug 14

  • CELCIS conversation circle—2 to 3 p.m. in the 4th floor reception area of Ellsworth Hall, hosted by the Center for English Language and Culture for International Students. Join students learning English in relaxed conversation about local and social topics. Free and open to the public.

Tuesday, Aug 15

  • CELCIS conversation circle—2 to 3 p.m. in the 4th floor reception area of Ellsworth Hall, hosted by the Center for English Language and Culture for International Students. Join students learning English in relaxed conversation about local and social topics. Free and open to the public.
  • Tibetan Buddhist meditation/study group—7:15 to 8:30 p.m. at Sanctuary Yoga, 1919 Stearns Ave., Kalamazoo, hosted by Western Michigan Jewel Heart. Explore in a practical way the practices associated with Tibetan Buddhism, including concentration, mindfulness, analysis and visualization. Free and open to the public. 

Wednesday, Aug 16

  • CELCIS conversation circle—2 to 3 p.m. in the 4th floor reception area of Ellsworth Hall, hosted by the Center for English Language and Culture for International Students. Join students learning English in relaxed conversation about local and social topics. Free and open to the public.

Thursday, Aug 17

  • CELCIS conversation circle (women only)—2 to 3 p.m. in the 4th floor reception area of Ellsworth Hall, hosted by the Center for English Language and Culture for International Students. Join students learning English in relaxed conversation about local and social topics. Free and open to women in the public. 
  • Garba Dancing Night—7:30 to 8:30 p.m. at the Rootead Dance Studio, 1501 Fulford Ave., Kalamazoo, hosted by the Kalamazoo Garba Club. Join the Kalamazoo Garba Club for a pop-up dance night to learn and practice the traditional fold dance from India. Entrance is $3; open to the public. 

Monday, Aug 28

  • Volunteer at International Orientation—all day Aug. 28 to Sept. 1 on the WMU campus, hosted by International Admissions and Services and International Student Activities. Students, staff, faculty and community members are invited to help welcome new international students to campus during International Orientation. Sign up required be emailing intl-activities@wmich.edu

Tuesday, Aug 29

  • Volunteer at International Orientation—all day Aug. 28 to Sept. 1 on the WMU campus, hosted by International Admissions and Services and International Student Activities. Students, staff, faculty and community members are invited to help welcome new international students to campus during International Orientation. Sign up required be emailing intl-activities@wmich.edu

Wednesday, Aug 30

  • Volunteer at International Orientation—all day Aug. 28 to Sept. 1 on the WMU campus, hosted by International Admissions and Services and International Student Activities. Students, staff, faculty and community members are invited to help welcome new international students to campus during International Orientation. Sign up required be emailing intl-activities@wmich.edu
  • "America's Diplomats" film screening—7 to 8 p.m. at Wealthy Theatre, 1130 Wealthy Street S.E., Grand Rapids, hosted by the World Affairs Council of Western Michigan. Narrated by Kathleen Turner, this documentary highlights the work that diplomats do across the world. Suggested donation $5; open to the public. 

Thursday, Aug 31

  • Volunteer at International Orientation—all day Aug. 28 to Sept. 1 on the WMU campus, hosted by International Admissions and Services and International Student Activities. Students, staff, faculty and community members are invited to help welcome new international students to campus during International Orientation. Sign up required be emailing intl-activities@wmich.edu

JULY 2017

Saturday, July 1

  • "Impressions: Modern Printmaking in Japan" exhibit—April 1 to July 23 at the Kalamazoo Institute of Arts, 314 S. Park St., Kalamazoo, hosted by the Kalamazoo Institute of the Arts. The exhibit features traditional Japanese woodblock prints that fascinated Western artists in the 19th century. Admission is $5; open to the public.

Monday, July 3

  • CELCIS conversation circle—2 to 3 p.m. in the 4th floor reception area of Ellsworth Hall, hosted by the Center for English Language and Culture for International Students. Join students learning English in relaxed conversation about local and social topics. Free and open to the public. 

Wednesday, July 5

  • CELCIS conversation circle—2 to 3 p.m. in the 4th floor reception area of Ellsworth Hall, hosted by the Center for English Language and Culture for International Students. Join students learning English in relaxed conversation about local and social topics. Free and open to the public. 

Thursday, July 6

  • CELCIS conversation circle (women only)—2 to 3 p.m. in the 4th floor reception area of Ellsworth Hall, hosted by the Center for English Language and Culture for International Students. Join students learning English in relaxed conversation about local and social topics. Free and open to women in the public. 

Saturday, July 8

  • Henry Ford and Greenfield Village with international students—all day at Green Field Village, 20900 Oakwood Blvd., Dearborn, hosted by International Student Activities. Join international students in visiting Michigan's famous history museum. Tickets are $20 and include bus transportation; open to the public.
  • "Deutsche Marques: A German Auto Event"—9 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the Gilmore Car Museum, 6865 W. Hickory Rd., Hickory Corners, hosted by the Deutsche Marques Club. The all German auto event features German marques including BMW, Audi, Porsche, Mercedes-Benz and Volkswagon.

Monday, July 10

  • CELCIS conversation circle—2 to 3 p.m. in the 4th floor reception area of Ellsworth Hall, hosted by the Center for English Language and Culture for International Students. Join students learning English in relaxed conversation about local and social topics. Free and open to the public.

Tuesday, July 11

  • "Black Ash Basketry: A Story of Cultural Resilience" ARTbreak documentary—noon in the Kalamazoo Institute of Arts Auditorium, 314 S. Park St., Kalamazoo, sponsored by the Fountains at Bronson Place. The documentary explores a Native American art of making basket that is threatened by the invasive emerald ash borer. Free and open to the public; coffee provided. 
  • CELCIS conversation circle—2 to 3 p.m. in the 4th floor reception area of Ellsworth Hall, hosted by the Center for English Language and Culture for International Students. Join students learning English in relaxed conversation about local and social topics. Free and open to the public.
  • Tibetan Buddhist meditation/study group—7:15 to 8:30 p.m. at Sanctuary Yoga, 1919 Stearns Ave., Kalamazoo, hosted by Western Michigan Jewel Heart. Explore in a practical way the practices associated with Tibetan Buddhism, including concentration, mindfulness, analysis and visualization. Free and open to the public. 

Wednesday, July 12

  • CELCIS conversation circle—2 to 3 p.m. in the 4th floor reception area of Ellsworth Hall, hosted by the Center for English Language and Culture for International Students. Join students learning English in relaxed conversation about local and social topics. Free and open to the public. 

Thursday, July 13

  • CELCIS conversation circle (women only)—2 to 3 p.m. in the 4th floor reception area of Ellsworth Hall, hosted by the Center for English Language and Culture for International Students. Join students learning English in relaxed conversation about local and social topics. Free and open to women in the public. 

Saturday, July 15

  • Kindleberger Park Arts with CELCIS students—1 to 9 p.m. at Kindleberger Park, Park Ave., Kalamazoo, hosted by the Center for English Language and Culture for International Students. Join CELCIS students in enjoying the arts, crafts and performances that Kalamazoo offers to its community. Free and open to the public. 
  • "Our People, Our Land, Our Images" exhibit opening—11 a.m. at the Kalamazoo Institute of Arts, 314 S. Park St., Kalamazoo, sponsored by Warner, Norcross and Judd Attorneys at Law. The exhibit features first-hand photographic accounts from indigenous artists from North America, Peru, Iraq and New Zealand. Entrance is $5 for adults and $2 with a valid student ID; open to the public. 

Monday, July 17

  • CELCIS conversation circle—2 to 3 p.m. in the 4th floor reception area of Ellsworth Hall, hosted by the Center for English Language and Culture for International Students. Join students learning English in relaxed conversation about local and social topics. Free and open to the public.

Tuesday, July 18

  • CELCIS conversation circle—2 to 3 p.m. in the 4th floor reception area of Ellsworth Hall, hosted by the Center for English Language and Culture for International Students. Join students learning English in relaxed conversation about local and social topics. Free and open to the public.
  • Tibetan Buddhist meditation/study group—7:15 to 8:30 p.m. at Sanctuary Yoga, 1919 Stearns Ave., Kalamazoo, hosted by Western Michigan Jewel Heart. Explore in a practical way the practices associated with Tibetan Buddhism, including concentration, mindfulness, analysis and visualization. Free and open to the public. 

Wednesday, July 19

  • Annual CELCIS meet and greet—1:15 to 3:30 p.m. in 208-209 Bernhard Center, hosted by the Center for English Language and Culture for International Students. Join CELCIS students in learning about their future academic programs and getting familiar with the resources available to students. Free and open to the public. 
  • International Ladies Sports Club—1:30 to 2:30 p.m. at the Student Recreation Center, hosted by International Student Activities. Bond with women from all over the world through sports and exercise. Free and open to all women in the community. 
  • CELCIS conversation circle—2 to 3 p.m. in the 4th floor reception area of Ellsworth Hall, hosted by the Center for English Language and Culture for International Students. Join students learning English in relaxed conversation about local and social topics. Free and open to the public.
  • International Champions Cup with international students—4:30 p.m. to 1 a.m. at Comerica Park, 2100 Woodward Ave., Detroit, hosted by International Student Activities. Join international students at the AC Roma vs. Paris St. Germain soccer match of the International Champions Cup. Tickets are $30 and include bus transportation; open to students with a valid Bronco ID.
  • "Braiding Knowledge: Community-Based Archaeology with Turkish and Native American Communities" lecture—7 p.m. at the Niles District Library, 620 E Main St., Niles, hosted by the Fort St. Joseph Archaeological Project. The lecture will be given by Dr. Sonya Atalay, associate professor of anthropology at the University of Massachusetts-Amherst. Free and open to the public.

Thursday, July 20

  • CELCIS conversation circle (women only)—2 to 3 p.m. in the 4th floor reception area of Ellsworth Hall, hosted by the Center for English Language and Culture for International Students. Join students learning English in relaxed conversation about local and social topics. Free and open to women in the public. 
  • Ice cream social with international students—2 to 4 p.m. in 3521 Ellsworth Hall, hosted by International Student Activities. Join international students for ice cream, raffles and games. Free and open to the public. 
  • "Changing Perspectives on Indigenous Art" talk and reception—6:30 p.m. in the Kalamazoo Institute of Arts Auditorium, 314 S. Park Ave., Kalamazoo, hosted by the Kalamazoo Institute of Arts. Internationally recognized scholar, curator and museum administrator David Penney will talk about the evolving place and respect for indigenous art in museums today. Free and open to the public.

Monday, July 24

  • CELCIS conversation circle—2 to 3 p.m. in the 4th floor reception area of Ellsworth Hall, hosted by the Center for English Language and Culture for International Students. Join students learning English in relaxed conversation about local and social topics. Free and open to the public.

Tuesday, July 25

  • CELCIS conversation circle—2 to 3 p.m. in the 4th floor reception area of Ellsworth Hall, hosted by the Center for English Language and Culture for International Students. Join students learning English in relaxed conversation about local and social topics. Free and open to the public.
  • Tibetan Buddhist meditation/study group—7:15 to 8:30 p.m. at Sanctuary Yoga, 1919 Stearns Ave., Kalamazoo, hosted by Western Michigan Jewel Heart. Explore in a practical way the practices associated with Tibetan Buddhism, including concentration, mindfulness, analysis and visualization. Free and open to the public. 

Wednesday, July 26

  • International Ladies Sports Club—1:30 to 2:30 p.m. at the Student Recreation Center, hosted by International Student Activities. Bond with women from all over the world through sports and exercise. Free and open to all women in the community. 
  • CELCIS conversation circle—2 to 3 p.m. in the 4th floor reception area of Ellsworth Hall, hosted by the Center for English Language and Culture for International Students. Join students learning English in relaxed conversation about local and social topics. Free and open to the public.

Thursday, July 27

  • CELCIS conversation circle (women only)—2 to 3 p.m. in the 4th floor reception area of Ellsworth Hall, hosted by the Center for English Language and Culture for International Students. Join students learning English in relaxed conversation about local and social topics. Free and open to women in the public. 

Friday, July 28

  • Dokidokon 2017—all day July 28-30 at the Four Points by Sheraton, 3655 E. Cork St., Kalamazoo, hosted by Dokidokon Kalamazoo. Dokidokon is a three-day anime convention that focuses on the appreciation, recognition and culture of Japanese animation. Registration required; open to the public. 
  • Wii bowling with CELCIS students—6 to 9 p.m. at Friendship Village, 1400 N Drake Rd., Kalamazoo, hosted by the Center for English Language and Culture for International Students. Join CELCIS students and residents of Friendship Village in a Wii bowling tournament. Free and open to the public. 

Saturday, July 29

  • Frankenmuth with international students—9 a.m. to 10 p.m. in Frankenmuth, hosted by International Student Activities. Join international students in a visit to Michigan's famous Bavarian city and a visit to the Birch Run Outlet Malls. Tickets are $10 and include bus transportation; open to the public.

Monday, July 31

  • CELCIS conversation circle—2 to 3 p.m. in the 4th floor reception area of Ellsworth Hall, hosted by the Center for English Language and Culture for International Students. Join students learning English in relaxed conversation about local and social topics. Free and open to the public.

June 2017

Thursday, June 1

  • Volunteering with international students—12:15 to 1:30 p.m. at Kalamazoo RESA West Campus, 4606 Croyden Ave., Kalamazoo, hosted by International Student Activities. Join international students in reading stories from different cultures to local school children. Registration required by visiting 3516, 3521 or 3530 Ellsworth Hall or emailing intl-outreach@wmich.edu. Free and open to the public. 
  • "Impressions: Modern Printmaking in Japan" exhibit—April 1 to July 23 at the Kalamazoo Institute of Arts, 314 S. Park St., Kalamazoo, hosted by the Kalamazoo Institute of the Arts. The exhibit features traditional Japanese woodblock prints that fascinated Western artists in the 19th century. Admission is $5; open to the public.
  • "Pressed for Time: History of Printmaking" exhibit—March 13 to July 2 at the Kalamazoo Institute of Arts, 314 S. Park St., Kalamazoo, hosted by the Kalamazoo Institute of the Arts. The exhibit features a historical survey of the four major processes of printmaking in the Western world and includes works by artists such as Rembrandt van Rijn, Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec and Pablo Picasso. Admission is $5; open to the public.
  • "And Still We Rise: Race, Culture and Visual Conversations" exhibit—Jan 21 to June 4 at the Kalamazoo Valley Museum, 230 N. Rose St., Kalamaoo, hosted by the Kalamazoo Valley Museum. The exhibit features quilts from more than 50 contemporary artists that reflect on moments in history that have contributed to transformations of social justice in the U.S. and across the globe. Free and open to the public.
  • "Journey Through the Pacific" exhibit—June at the Grand Rapids Public Museum, 272 Pearl St. N.W., Grand Rapids, hosted by the citizens of Kent County. The exhibit features the islands and cultures of the Pacific Ocean. General museum admission for adults is $10, $5 for students with a valid ID; open to the public.

Friday, June 2

  • International Night with the Kalamazoo Growlers—6:30 to 9:30 p.m. at Home Stryker Field, 251 Mills St., Kalamazoo, hosted by International Student Activities. Join international students at the 4th annual International Night with the Kalamazoo Growlers. Tickets are $5 and include bus transportation, entrance and all you can eat food and soft drinks; open to the public. 

Tuesday, June 6

  • "1,000 Years of Karakami Art" ARTbreak documentary—noon at the Kalamazoo Institute of Arts Auditorium, 314 S. Park St., Kalamazoo, hosted by the Fountains at Bronson Place. The documentary explores Karakami, a decorative Japanese paper art, and the work of a family in Kyoto that has preserved this traditional art form for nearly 400 years. Free and open to the public; coffee provided. 
  • Free tutoring for Spanish oral proficiency interview—noon to 1 p.m. in 3010 Brown Hall, hosted by the Department of Spanish. Join this free practice session for the oral proficiency interview required by the College of Education and Human Development and the Michigan Department of Education before interning in public schools. Free and open to the public. 

Wednesday, June 7

  • International Ladies' Sports Club—1:15 to 2:15 p.m. at the Student Recreation Center, hosted by International Student Activities. Bond with women from all over the world through sports and exercise. Free and open to all women in the community. 
  • Cultivate Community Through Cooking Series—5 to 7 p.m. at the Arcus Center for Social Justice, 205 Monroe Street, Kalamazoo, hosted by the Thrive Refugee Support Center and Refugee Outreach Kalamazoo. Each class will be taught by an individual who has recently resettled in the Kalamazoo community as a refugee. Registration is $15; open to the public.

Friday, June 9

  • Discover WMU: Broncos Night out with International Student Activities—6 to 9 p.m. at Heritage Hall, hosted by MyWMU and International Student Activities. Join international students as they learn about the things that make WMU and the West Michigan community special. Free and open to the public; register in Ellsworth 3516, 3521 or 3530.

Sunday, June 11

  • "Impressions: Modern Printmaking in Japan" Sunday tour—2 to 3 p.m. at the Kalamazoo Institute of Arts, 314 S. Park St., Kalamazoo, hosted by the Kalamazoo Institute of the Arts. The museum offers a docent-guided tour of the Impressions: Modern Printmaking in Japan exhibit. Included in museum admission; open to the public.

Tuesday, June 13

  • Origami and calligraphy lessons—10 to 11 a.m. in Sangren Hall, hosted by the Soga Japan Center. The Soga Japan Center will offer a origami and Japanese calligraphy workshop for the students of Milestones Child Development Center who are on campus for a summer program. Open to students of the Milestones Child Development Center.
  • Free tutoring for Spanish oral proficiency interview—noon to 1 p.m. in 3010 Brown Hall, hosted by the Department of Spanish. Join this free practice session for the oral proficiency interview required by the College of Education and Human Development and the Michigan Department of Education before interning in public schools. Free and open to the public. 

Wednesday, June 14

  • Origami and calligraphy lessons—10 to 11 a.m. in Sangren Hall, hosted by the Soga Japan Center. The Soga Japan Center will offer a origami and Japanese calligraphy workshop for the students of Milestones Child Development Center who are on campus for a summer program. Open to students of the Milestones Child Development Center.

Thursday, June 15

  • Origami and calligraphy lessons—10 to 11 a.m. in Sangren Hall, hosted by the Soga Japan Center. The Soga Japan Center will offer a origami and Japanese calligraphy workshop for the students of Milestones Child Development Center who are on campus for a summer program. Open to students of the Milestones Child Development Center.
  • Garba dancing night—7 to 8:30 p.m. at the Rootead Dance Studio, 1501 Fulford Avenue, Kalamazoo, hosted by the Kalamazoo Garba Club. Join the Kalamazoo Garba Club for a pop-up dance night to learn and practice the traditional folk dance from India. Entrance is $3; open to the public.

Saturday, June 17

  • Shipshewana with International Student Activities—10 a.m. to 5 p.m. in Shipshewana, Indiana, hosted by International Student Activities. Join international students as they visit Shipshewana and learn about its significance in the Midwest. Cost is $5; register in Ellsworth 3516, 3521 or 3530. Open to the public.

Monday, June 19 

  • BINGO night with CELCIS students—6:30 to 9:30 p.m. at The Fountains at Bronson Place, 1700 Bronson Way, Kalamazoo, hosted by the Center for English Language and Culture for International Students. Join CELCIS in teaching international students how to play the popular U.S. game of luck, BINGO. Free and open to the public.

Tuesday, June 20

  • "Lasansky: Inside the Image" ARTbreak talk—noon at the Kalamazoo Institute of Arts Auditorium, 314 S. Park St., Kalamazoo, hosted by the Fountains at Bronson Place. The talk discuses the work of Mauricio Lasansky, an Argentine artist and educator known for his advanced techniques in printmaking. Free and open to the public; coffee provided.
  • Free tutoring for Spanish oral proficiency interview—noon to 1 p.m. in 3010 Brown Hall, hosted by the Department of Spanish. Join this free practice session for the oral proficiency interview required by the College of Education and Human Development and the Michigan Department of Education before interning in public schools. Free and open to the public. 

Wednesday, June 21

  • International Ladies' Sports Club—1:15 to 2:15 p.m. at the Student Recreation Center, hosted by International Student Activities. Bond with women from all over the world through sports and exercise. Free and open to all women in the community. 

Friday, June 23

  • 17th Annual Kalamazoo Irish Festival—5 p.m. Friday, June 23 to 10 p.m. Saturday, June 24 at Old Dog Tavern, 402 E. Kalamazoo Ave., Kalamazoo, hosted by the Kalamazoo Irish Fest. The festival will feature Irish music, dance and other cultural performances. Entrance starts at $6; open to the public. 

Saturday, June 24

  • Hunchback of Notre Dame—8 p.m. at the Barn Theatre, 13351 W. M-96, Augusta, hosted by the Barn Theatre School. The play is based on Victor Hugo's classic novel and the Disney animated feature, the Hunchback of Notre Dame. Entrance is $37; open to the public.

Sunday, June 25

  • Hunchback of Notre Dame—5 p.m. at the Barn Theatre, 13351 W. M-96, Augusta, hosted by the Barn Theatre School. The play is based on Victor Hugo's classic novel and the Disney animated feature, the Hunchback of Notre Dame. Entrance is $37; open to the public.

Monday, June 26

  • CELCIS conversation circle—2 to 3 p.m. in the 4th floor reception area of Ellsworth Hall, hosted by the Center for English Language and Culture for International Students. Join students learning English in relaxed conversation about local and social topics. Free and open to the public. 

Tuesday, June 27

  • Free tutoring for Spanish oral proficiency interview—noon to 1 p.m. in 3010 Brown Hall, hosted by the Department of Spanish. Join this free practice session for the oral proficiency interview required by the College of Education and Human Development and the Michigan Department of Education before interning in public schools. Free and open to the public. 
  • CELCIS conversation circle—2 to 3 p.m. in the 4th floor reception area of Ellsworth Hall, hosted by the Center for English Language and Culture for International Students. Join students learning English in relaxed conversation about local and social topics. Free and open to the public. 

Wednesday, June 28

  • CELCIS conversation circle—2 to 3 p.m. in the 4th floor reception area of Ellsworth Hall, hosted by the Center for English Language and Culture for International Students. Join students learning English in relaxed conversation about local and social topics. Free and open to the public. 

Thursday, June 29

  • CELCIS conversation circle (women only)—2 to 3 p.m. in the 4th floor reception area of Ellsworth Hall, hosted by the Center for English Language and Culture for International Students. Join students learning English in relaxed conversation about local and social topics. Free and open to women in the public. 

MAY 2017

Tuesday, May 2

  • "20th Century Korean Art with Christine Han and Grace Chae" ARTbreak talk—noon at the Kalamazoo Institute of Arts Auditorium, 314 S. Park St., Kalamazoo, hosted by the Kalamazoo Institute of Arts. Historian Grace Chae and art historian Christine Hahn will contextualize the art, history, and culture of the Korean peninsula in the early to mid-20th century. Free and open to the public; coffee provided. 

Thursday, May 4

  • International Student Orientation—all day May 4 and 5 in the Bernhard Center, hosted by International Admissions and International Student Activities. Help welcome new international students to campus by offering a friendly smile or a helping hand to any students with questions. Free and open to the public. 

Friday, May 5

  • 2017 Kalamazoo Bach Festival—May 5 to 14 at various venues throughout Kalamazoo, hosted by Kalamazoo College, the Irving S. Gilmore Foundation, Michigan Council for the Arts and Cultural Affairs, Art Works, and the Arts Council of Greater Kalamazoo. The festival offers a week-long celebration of German composer Johann Sebastian Bach's life and legacy. Fees vary; open to the public.

Monday, May 8

  • Administrative search for the Haenicke Institute for Global Education Associate Provost public presentation—10 a.m. in the Fetzer Center Putney Auditorium, hosted by Western Michigan University. The presentation will be given by Dr. Paulo Zagalo-Melo, Provost for Global Century Education at the University of Montana. Free and open to the public.
  • Chinese culture classes begin—5:30 p.m. at Western Michigan University, hosted by the Confucius Institute at WMU. Learn about Chinese culture in one of seven courses offered this summer including Chinese calligraphy, Taichi, and Chinese language. Registration fee varies with discounts for seniors, students, and WMU employees; open to the public.

Tuesday, May 9

  • Administrative search for the Haenicke Institute for Global Education Associate Provost public presentation—10 a.m. in the Fetzer Center Putney Auditorium, hosted by Western Michigan University. The presentation will be given by Dr. Nick Gozik, Director of the Office of International Programs and the McGillycuddy-Logue Center for Undergraduate Global Studies at Boston College. Free and open to the public.
  • "Tibetan Buddhism for Modern Life" workshop—7 to 8:30 p.m. in Room 19 of the People's Church, 1758 N. Tenth St., Kalamazoo, hosted by Jewel Heart. The workshop will focus on how to apply ancient wisdom to daily life. Free and open to the public.

Thursday, May 11

  • 52nd International Congress on Medieval StudiesMay 11 to 14 at Western Michigan University, hosted by the Medieval Institute at WMU. The congress features more than 550 sessions of papers, panel discussions, roundtables and performances. Registration and fee required, discounts offered for students; open to the public.
  • Cultivate Community Through Cooking Series—5 to 7 p.m. at the Arcus Center for Social Justice, 205 Monroe Street, Kalamazoo, hosted by the Thrive Refugee Support Center and Refugee Outreach Kalamazoo. Each class will be taught by an individual who has recently resettled in the Kalamazoo community as a refugee. Registration is $15; open to the public.

Saturday, May 13

  • 42nd Stulburg International String Competition—9 a.m. to 10 p.m. at the Dalton Recital Hall, hosted by the Stulberg International String Competition. Twelve semifinalists from around the world compete for a chance to win cash prizes and performance opportunities. Daytime performances are free, tickets for evening finals are $20, $5 with a student ID; open to the public.

Monday, May 15

  • Administrative search for the Haenicke Institute for Global Education Associate Provost public presentation—10 a.m. in the Fetzer Center Putney Auditorium, hosted by Western Michigan University. The presentation will be given by Dr. Sharon Nagy, Vice Provost for Global Engagement at Clemson University. Free and open to the public.

Tuesday, May 16

  • "Hate Rising" fillm screening—5:30 to 8 p.m. at the Douglass Community Association, 1000 West Paterson Street, Kalamazoo, hosted by Welcoming Michigan, the Hispanic American Council, Bethany Christian Services, the Social Welfare Alliance, and the Douglas Community Association. The film is part of the United We Rise three-part film series fostering solidarity through conversations on immigration, community and race in Kalamazoo. Free and open to the public.

Wednesday, May 17

  • Administrative search for the Haenicke Institute for Global Education Associate Provost public presentation—10 a.m. in the Fetzer Center Putney Auditorium, hosted by Western Michigan University. The presentation will be given by Dr. Martyn Miller, Interim Assistant Vice President for International Affairs and Director for International Services at Temple University. Free and open to the public.
  • Cultivate Community Through Cooking Series—5 to 7 p.m. at the Arcus Center for Social Justice, 205 Monroe Street, Kalamazoo, hosted by the Thrive Refugee Support Center and Refugee Outreach Kalamazoo. Each class will be taught by an individual who has recently resettled in the Kalamazoo community as a refugee. Registration is $15; open to the public.
  • Taste of the World—6 to 8 p.m. at the Kalamazoo County Expo Center, 2900 Lake Street, Kalamazoo, hosted by Colleagues International. Join Colleages International for their annual fundraising event that offers cuisine from around the world. Tickets are $35, $15 for children 12 and under; open to the public. 
  • Garba dancing night—7 to 8:30 p.m. at the Rootead Dance Studio, 1501 Fulford Avenue, Kalamazoo, hosted by the Kalamazoo Garba Club. Join the Kalamazoo Garba Club for a pop-up dance night to learn and practice the traditional folk dance from India. Entrance is $3; open to the public.

Thursday, May 18

  • "WorldQuest" trivia night—5:30 p.m. at the Wege Center on the Aquinas College Campus, 1700 Fulton St. East, Grand Rapids, Michigan, hosted by the World Affairs Council. The trivia competition features questions from all over the globe. Tickets are $60 and includes registration, dinner, and snacks; open to the public.

Sunday, May 21

  • Cultural Diversity for Dialogue and Development World Day—3 to 5 p.m. at the First Baptist Church, 315 West Michigan Avenue, Kalamazoo, hosted by the Multicultural Center at the First Baptist Church. The world day event will feature opportunities for cross-cultural exchange with food and performances from around the world. Free and open to the public.

Monday, May 22

  • Cultivate Community Through Cooking Series—5 to 7 p.m. at the Arcus Center for Social Justice, 205 Monroe Street, Kalamazoo, hosted by the Thrive Refugee Support Center and Refugee Outreach Kalamazoo. Each class will be taught by an individual who has recently resettled in the Kalamazoo community as a refugee. Registration is $15; open to the public.

Tuesday, May 23

  • CELCIS welcome party—1:30 to 3:30 p.m. at the Burnhams Residence Halls, hosted by the Center for English Language and Culture for International Students. Join CELCIS in welcoming new students with food, fun and games. Free and open to the public.

Thursday, May 25

  • Japanese Cooking Class—11 to 1:30 p.m. at Solid Grounds Church, 1702 West Michigan Avenue, Kalamazoo, hosted by the WMU Soga Japan Center. Participants will learn how to cook traditional Japanese dishes. Registration is $5 for WMU students and $10 for non-students and includes all the ingredients; email michiko.yoshimoto@wmich.edu to register. Open to the public.

Saturday, May 27

  • Farmer's market with CELCIS students—9 to 1 p.m. at the Kalamazoo Farmer's Market, 1204 Bank St., Kalamazoo, hosted by the Center for English Language and Culture for International Students. Join CELCIS in showing international students the local culture through a visit to the farmer's market. Free and open to the public.

Tuesday, May 30

  • "Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec" ARTbreak exhibit—noon at the Kalamazoo Institute of Arts Auditorium, 314 S. Park St., Kalamazoo, hosted by the Kalamazoo Institute of Arts. The exhibit features a film that archives famous graphic artist Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec's work depicting the world of Paris cabarets. Free and open to the public; coffee provided. 
  • Free tutoring for Spanish oral proficiency interview—noon to 1 p.m. in 3010 Brown Hall, hosted by the Department of Spanish. Join this free practice session for the oral proficiency interview required by the College of Education and Human Development and the Michigan Department of Education before interning in public schools. Free and open to the public. 

APRIL 2017

Saturday, April 1

  • "Worshiping at Lenin's Mausoleum" book reading—1 to 2:30 p.m. at Kazoo Books, 2413 Parkview Ave, Kalamazoo. Join Dr. Judith Rypma, master faculty specialist of English, as she reads from her latest collection "Worshipping at Lenin's Mausoleum." Free and open to the public.
  • "Celebrating the Legacy of César E. Chávez" fundraising and awards dinner—5 p.m. at the Fetzer Center, hosted by the Division of Multicultural Affairs and the Southwest Michigan César E. Chávez Committee. The event will celebrate the life and work of civil rights leader César E. Chávez during an annual scholarship fundraising dinner that includes the presentation of regional awards and scholarships for 2017. Tickets are $25 for students and $40 for general admission; open to the public.
  • WMU Study Abroad poetry exhibit—April 1 to April 21 in the first floor of the Waldo Library, hosted by the University Libraries. Enjoy poetry exhibits from WMU Study Abroad alumni that showcase their experiences abroad. Free and open to the public. 

Sunday, April 2

  • International Festival—4 to 8 p.m. in the Bernhard Center second-floor facilities at Western Michigan University. The music, dance, food and fashions of over 18 cultures will be showcased during Western Michigan University's 28th annual International Festival. Admission is free; nominal fee for traditional foods prepared by international students. Open to the public.

Monday, April 3

  • "Shifts in the Sand: U.S.-Saudi Relations" Great Decisions Global Discussion Series—6 to 7:15 p.m. at the Aquinas Performing Arts Center, 1703 Robinson Rd SE, Grand Rapids, hosted by the World Affairs Council of Western Michigan. The discussion will feature Simon Henderson, director of the Gulf and Energy Policy Program at the Washington Institute for Near East Politics. Tickets are free with a WMU ID, $10 general admission. Open to the public.
  • "The Marriage of Figaro" opera—7:30 p.m. in the Dalton Recital Hall, hosted by the School of Music. The "Marriage of Figaro" is an opera buffa (comedy) in four acts composed in 1786 by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart. Free and open to the public.

Tuesday, April 4

  • "The Marriage of Figaro" opera—7:30 p.m. in the Dalton Recital Hall, hosted by the School of Music. The "Marriage of Figaro" is an opera buffa (comedy) in four acts composed in 1786 by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart. Free and open to the public.

Wednesday, April 5

  • "On the Implications of a Piecemeal Approach to Immigration Policy and Enforcement" lecture—noon to 1:15 p.m. in 2028 Brown Hall, hosted by the Department of Economics Werner Sichel Lecture Series. The lecture will be given by Dr. Catalina Amuedo-Dorantes, professor and chair of economics at San Diego State University. Free and open to the public.

Thursday, April 6

  • "Urbanization and Social Change in Early 20th-Century Xikang (in Tibet), China" talk—noon in 204 Bernhard Center, hosted by the Haenicke Institute for Global Education. The talk will be given by Yang Liu, assistant research fellow and PhD candidate at the Institute of Urban Studies at Sichuan University, China. Free and open to the public.
  • Board games with CELCIS students—2 to 3 p.m. in the fourth-floor CELCIS Lobby of Ellsworth Hall, hosted by the Center for English Language and Culture for International Students. Join CELCIS students as they learn to play U.S. American card and board games, chat with friends, hang out and meet new people! Free and open to the public.
  • "Again Toward Perpetual Peace: World Government by Lottocracy" lecture—6 p.m. in 213 Bernhard Center, hosted by the Center for Ethics in Society. The lecture will be given by Dr. Alexander Guerrero, professor of philosophy at the University of Pennsylvania. Free and open to the public.
  • "Shared Rituals, Shared Ecology: Hindu and Muslim Honey Collectors and Fisherman of the Sundarbans" talk—6 to 7:30 p.m. in the Fetzer Center, hosted by the Department of Religion Islam in Global Perspective Speaker Series. The talk will be given by Dr. Sufia Uddin, associate professor of religious studies at Connecticut College. Free and open to the public.

Friday, April 7

  • Japanese language lessons for teens—4 to 4:45 p.m. in 2045 Brown Hall, hosted by the Soga Japan Center. A series of three beginner Japanese language sessions are available to middle and high school students. Registration is $30; open to the public.

Saturday, April 8

  • Walk for Water Kalamazoo 5k—1 p.m. by the fountains by Miller Auditorium, sponsored by the WMU Nonprofit Leadership Student Association, Kappa Phi Christian Women's Club and St. Thomas More Catholic Student Parish. The walk aims to increase awareness of the worldwide lack of access to clean water and to raise funds to help Clean Water for the World in its efforts to provide water purification units to communities in developing countries without potable water. Registration starts at $10; open to the public.

Sunday, April 9

  • Los Lobos at the Kalamazoo State Theatre—7:30 p.m. at the Kalamazoo State Theatre, 404 South Burdick Street, Kalamazoo. Los Lobos are a multiple Grammy Award-winning rock band from East Los Angeles whose music is influenced by rock and roll, Tex-Mex, country, R&B, blues, and traditional music from Latin America. Tickets start at $55; open to the public.

Monday, April 10

  • Japanese poetry game—2:45 p.m. in the lower level of the Waldo Library, hosted by the Soga Japan Center and the University Libraries. Learn a poetry game from Japan; Japanese language skills are not required. Free and open to the public.
  • "Social Turmoil in Hong Kong: Challenging Chinese Sovereignty?" lecture—4 p.m. in 1740 Sangren Hall, hosted by the Timothy Light Lecture Series on China. The lecture will be given by Dr. Helen Siu, professor of anthropology at Yale University. Free and open to the public.
  • Peace Corps information session—5:30 to 6:30 p.m. in 3301 Freidmann Hall, hosted by the Peace Corps. Join the session to learn about volunteer experiences, ask questions about service, and gain tips on completing an application. Free and open to the public.

Wednesday, April 12

  • "Respecting Differences: Gender Inclusion" talk—9:30 a.m. in the Miller Auditorium, hosted by Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo College, Discover Kalamazoo, the City of Portage and the Kalamazoo Community Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services. The talk will be given by Scott Schofield, diversity educator on transgender issues. Free and open to the public.
  • "Voices of First Generation Latino Immigrant Fathers: Migration and the Dual Frame of Reference" lecture—noon to 1 p.m. in the Lee Honors College Lounge, hosted by the Lee Honor's College Spring 2017 Lyceum Lecture Series. The lecture will be given by Dr. Angel Gullon-Rivera, assistant professor of family consumer sciences. Free and open to the public.
  • "Respecting Differences: Gender Inclusion" talk—1:30 p.m. in the Miller Auditorium, hosted by Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo College, Discover Kalamazoo, the City of Portage and the Kalamazoo Community Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services. The talk will be given by Scott Schofield, diversity educator on transgender issues. Free and open to the public.
  • "Documented" film screening—5:30 to 8 p.m. in 208-209 Bernhard Center, hosted by Welcoming Michigan, the Hispanic American Council, Bethany Christian Services, the Social Welfare Alliance, and the Douglas Community Association. The film is part of the United We Rise three-part film series fostering solidarity through conversations on immigration, community and race in Kalamazoo. Free and open to the public.

Thursday, April 13

  • "Cultural Competence for Health Professionals" talk—12:30 to 1 p.m. at the WMU Beltline campus, 2333 E Beltline Ave SE, Grand Rapids, hosted by the WMU-Grand Rapids Open House. The talk will be given by Dr. Dee Sherwood, faculty specialist in the School of Social Work. Free and open to the public.
  • "Hungary and the New Financial Nationalism in Europe" lecture—3:30 to 5 p.m. in the Friedmann Hall third-floor library, hosted by the Department of Political Science George Klein Lecture Series. The lecture will be given by Dr. Juliet Johnson, professor of political science at McGill University. Free and open to the public.
  • "Refugee Health: Concerns, Considerations and Photos from Congolese Refugee Women" talk—4 to 4:30 p.m. at the WMU Beltline campus, 2333 E Beltline Ave SE, Grand Rapids, hosted by the WMU-Grand Rapids Open House. The talk will be given by Dr. Shannon McMorrow, assistant professor in the School of Interdisciplinary Health Programs. Free and open to the public.
  • Retirement reception—4 to 7 p.m. at the Oaklands, hosted by the Center for English Language and Culture for International Students. The reception will honor Joel Boyd for his 21.5 years of service to the University. Free and open to the public. 
  • "Monumental Politics in the Post-Communist World" lecture—7 to 9 p.m. in the Fetzer Center's Putney Auditorium, hosted by the Department of Political Science George Klein Lecture Series. The lecture will be given by Dr. Juliet Johnson, professor of political science at McGill University. Free and open to the public.

Friday, April 14

  • Asian Forum—9 to 3 p.m. in Sangren Hall, hosted by the Diether H. Haenicke Institute for Global Education, Confucius Institute at WMU, Soga Japan Center and the Timothy Light Center for Chinese Studies. The Asian Forum provides a forum for scholars at WMU and in the West Michigan area who work on Asia to share their research and to learn about ways in which to network with other faculty. Registration required; open to the public.
  • Japanese language lessons for teens—4 to 4:45 p.m. in 2045 Brown Hall, hosted by the Soga Japan Center. A series of three beginner Japanese language sessions are available to middle and high school students. Registration is $30; open to the public.
  • International Ball—7 to 11 p.m. in the Student Center of the Bernhard Center, hosted by International Student Activities and the Western Student Association. The International Ball is a fun formal event where domestic and international students can end the semester with dinner, dancing and the comedian Danish Maqbool. Tickets start at $5; purchase tickets in 3516, 3521, or 3530 Ellsworth Hall or by emailing intl-specialprojects@wmich.edu.

Saturday, April 15

  • Latin Festival—2 to 5 p.m. in the Student Recreation Center, hosted by Phi Iota Alpha and Western Michigan University Student Association. The festival will feature food, beverages, dancing, music, and games that celebrate Latin cultures. Free and open to the public.

Monday, April 17

  • "Recycling in Early Modern Europe: Paper Manufacture in Brandenburg" lecture—noon to 1:30 p.m. in 2302 Freidmann Hall, hosted by the Department of History. The lecture will be given by Dr. Marion (Buddy) Gray, professor of history and gender and women's studies. Free and open to the public.

Wednesday, April 19

  • Local Global Market—10 to 2 p.m. in front of Sangren Hall, hosted by International Student Activities. Area farmers will bring fresh fruits and produce to campus for purchase. Email wayne.l.bond@wmich.edu for questions. Free and open to the public.
  • "The Great Economic Potential of Immigration to the U.S." lecture—noon to 1:15 p.m. in 2028 Brown Hall, hosted by the Department of Economics Werner Sichel Lecture Series. The lecture will be given by Dr. Giovanni Peri, professor and chair of economics at the University of California, Davis. Free and open to the public.
  • "Is There a Muslim Body? Reflections on a Moving Target" talk—6 to 7:30 p.m. in the Fetzer Center, hosted by the Department of Religion Islam in Global Perspective Speaker Series. The talk will be given by Dr. Emilio Spadola, associate professor of anthropology and Middle Eastern studies and Islamic studies at Colgate University. Free and open to the public.
  • Garba dancing night—7 p.m. at the Rootead Dance Studio, 1501 Fulford Avenue, Kalamazoo, hosted by the Kalamazoo Garba Club. Join the Kalamazoo Garba Club for a pop-up dance night to learn and practice the traditional folk dance from India. Entrance is $3; open to the public.

Thursday, April 20

  • End-of-year celebration with CELCIS students—1:30 to 3:30 p.m. at the Goldsworth Valley Pond Pavilion, hosted by the Center for English Language and Culture for International Students. Join CELCIS students and staff for games, arts and crafts to celebrate the end of the semester. Free and open to the public.
  • "Transference: Poetry in Translation" poetry readings—4 p.m. on the third floor of Waldo Library, hosted by the Department of World Languages and Literatures and the University Libraries. Faculty and students present readings of poetry in translation. Free and open to the public.
  • "Three Zimbabwe Human Rights Concerns" talk—6:30 to 8:30 p.m. at the Kalamazoo Public Library, 315 Rose Street, Kalamazoo, hosted by the Kalamazoo Nonviolent Opponents to War. The talk will be given by Paul Bhekimpi Tshele, a human rights activist and Kalamazoo College graduate.

Friday, April 21

  • Japanese language lessons for teens—4 to 4:45 p.m. in 2045 Brown Hall, hosted by the Soga Japan Center. A series of three beginner Japanese language sessions are available to middle and high school students. Registration is $30; open to the public.

Saturday, April 22

  • Around the World Presentation Series: Russia and Tunisia—5:30 to 8 p.m. in 2015 Bernhard Center, hosted by the Fulbright program at WMU. Two Foreign Language Teaching Assistants will talk about culture of their home countries of Russia and Tunisia followed by a cuisine from their respective countries. Free and open to the public.

Monday, April 24

  • Exam care packages from WMU Study Abroad—9 to 12 in the CHHS Atrium, hosted by WMU Study Abroad. Take a break from studying to pick up an exam care package and chat with study abroad alumni about their experience. Free and open to the public.

Tuesday, April 25

  • Cultivate Community Through Cooking Series—5 to 7 p.m. at the Arcus Center for Social Justice, 205 Monroe Street, Kalamazoo, hosted by the Thrive Refugee Support Center and Refugee Outreach Kalamazoo. Each class will be taught by an individual who has recently resettled in the Kalamazoo community as a refugee. Registration is $15; open to the public.

Thursday, April 27

  • Exam care packages from WMU Study Abroad—9 to 12 in the Bernhard Center main floor lobby, hosted by WMU Study Abroad. Take a break from studying to pick up an exam care package and chat with study abroad alumni about their experience. Free and open to the public.
  • "Under the Same Moon" film screening—5:30 to 8 p.m. at the Hispanic American Council, 930 Lake Street, Kalamazoo, hosted by Welcoming Michigan, the Hispanic American Council, Bethany Christian Services, the Social Welfare Alliance, and the Douglas Community Association. The film is part of the United We Rise three-part film series fostering solidarity through conversations on immigration, community and race in Kalamazoo. Free and open to the public.
  • "Ambivalent Encounters: Migration, Conversion, and Historical Anxiety in Spain's 'Muslim City'" talk—6 to 7:30 p.m. in the Fetzer Center, hosted by the Department of Religion Islam in Global Perspective Speaker Series. The talk will be given by Dr. Mikaela Rogozen-Soltar, assistant professor of anthropology at the University of Nevada, Reno. Free and open to the public.
  • "Perspectives on Peace in the New U.S. Administration" talk—6:30 to 7:30 p.m. at the Kent District Library, 2870 Jack Smith Ave. SE, Grand Rapids, hosted by the World Affairs Council of Western Michigan. The talk will be given by Dr. Frederic Pearson, director of the Center for Peace and Conflict Studies at Wayne State University. Free and open to the public.

March 2017

Wednesday, March 1

  • 2017 Yomiuri Prize for Literature Reading Reception—4:30 to 6 p.m. in rooms 1035 and 1045 of the Fetzer Center at Western Michigan University, hosted by the Haenicke Institute for Global Education, the Soga Japan Center, the Department of World Languages and Literatures, and the University Center for the Humanities. Join the reception to celebrate Dr. Jeffrey Angles, WMU professor of Japanese and recipient of the 2017 Yomiuri Prize for Literature in the poetry and haiku section for his book Watashi no Hidsuke henkosen (My International Dateline). Free and open to the public. Information.
  • "Social Media in China: An Update" Lecture—4 p.m. in 1028 Brown Hall, hosted by the Haenicke Institute for Global Education, the WMU Timothy Light Center for Chinese Studies, the WMU School of Communication, and Kalamazoo Valley College. The lecture will be given by Dr. King-wa Fu, associate professor of journalism and media studies at the University of Hong Kong. Free and open to the public. Information.
  • "Robots in Japan" Lecture—5 p.m. in room 103 of Dewing Hall at Kalamazoo College, hosted by Kalamazoo College. The lecture will be given by Dr. Jennifer Robertson, the 2017 Nagai Kafû lecturer and professor of anthropology and the history of art at the University of Michigan. Free and open to the public. Information.
  • "Wadado Leo Smith: Ankhrasmation, the Language Scores" Art Exhibition—daily until March 5 at the Kalamazoo Institute of Arts, hosted by the Kalamazoo Institute of Arts. A pioneer in the fields of contemporary jazz and creative music, Wadada Leo Smith is a composer, educator, and visual artist who developed Ankhrasmation over the course of 50 years. The word for his musical language is composed of Ankh, the Egyption symbol for life, Ras, the Ethopian word for leader, and Ma, a universal term for mother. Admission for students is $2 and $5 for adults. Open to the public. Information.

Thursday March 2

  • Farewell Reception—3 to 5 p.m. in the Bernhard Center's Bronco Global Lounge, hosted by the Haenicke Institute for Global Education. Join the farewell reception for Associate Provost of the Haenicke Institute, Dr. Wolfgang Schlör. Refreshments provided. Free and open to the public.
  • "Mental Health in a Cultural Context" Real Talk Diversity Series—6 to 7:30 p.m. in the Trimpe Building Multicultural Center, hosted by the Office of Diversity and Inclusion. The talk will be given by Deidre Begay, WMU Ph.D. candidate in counselor education and counseling psychology. Free and open to the public. Information.

Friday, March 3

  • Deadline for applications for short-term summer I faculty exchange—midnight, hosted by the WMU Haenicke Institute for Global Education. The Universidad de Burgos, Spain, and the University of Passau, Germany, invite applications for a short-term faculty exchange during the summer I semester. To apply, send a letter of interest and curriculum vitae to michelle.metro-roland@wmich.edu by Friday March 3, 2017. WMU faculty members from any discipline are eligible. Information.
  • Deadline for CIEE International Faculty Development Seminar funding—midnight, hosted by the Haenicke Institute for Global Education. The Haenicke Institute for Global Education is inviting faculty who are interested in joining a CIEE International Faculty Development Seminars (IFDS) this summer. Applications should be submitted Dr. Michelle Metro-Roland, Director of Faculty and Global Program Development, michelle.metro-roland@wmich.edu. Information.

Saturday, March 4

  • National History Day District 6 Competition Day—8 to 4 p.m. in the Bernhard Center at Western Michigan University, hosted by the WMU Department of History. Elementary and secondary students are invited to participate in a National History Day competition. Open to elementary and secondary students; registration required. Information.

Monday, March 6

  • Spring Break Day-Trip with International Students: Gilmore Car Museum—10 a.m. to noon at the Gilmore Care Museum, hosted by WMU International Student Activities. Join the international students as they spend a day of spring break learning about the history of cars in Michigan. Registration is $5 and includes admission and transportation; register by emailing intl-activities@wmich.edu. Open to the public. Information. 

Wednesday, March 8

  • Spring Break Day-Trip with International Students: Lighthouse Place Premium Outlets—10 to 2 p.m. at the Lighthouse Place Premium Outlets, hosted by WMU International Student Activities. Join the international students as they spend a day of spring break at the Lighthouse Place Premium Outlets in Indiana. Registration is $5 and includes admission and transportation; register by emailing intl-activities@wmich.edu. Open to the public. Information. 

Saturday, March 11

  • Spring Break Day-Trip with International Students: Gilda's Laughfest—day event at the Super Saturday Kids Zone, hosted by WMU International Student Activities. Join the international students as they spend a day of spring break at Gilda's Laughfest at the Super Saturday Kids Zone. Registration is $5 and includes admission and transportation; register by emailing intl-activities@wmich.edu. Open to the public. Information. 
  • Sir András Schiff: The Gilmore Piano Masters Series—8 to 10 p.m. at the Wellspring Theater at the Epic Center, hosted by the Gilmore Theatre. Sir András Schiff is world-renowned and critically acclaimed as a pianist, conductor, and lecturer. The Hungarian-born virtuoso has been recognized with Grammy Awards, Gramophone Awards, the Gold Medal from the Royal Philharmonic Society, and the Royal Academy of Music Bach Prize. Tickets start at $6 for students and $30 for non-students. Open to the public. Information.

Sunday, March 12

  • Discover WMU with International Students: Maple Sugar Festival—11 to 2 p.m. at the Kalamazoo Nature Center, hosted by WMU International Student Activities. Join international students as they learn about one of the things that makes the West Michigan community special. Registration is $5. Open to the public. Information.

Monday, March 13

  • "Afghanistan: Fight...or Run?" Great Decisions Global Discussion—6 to 7:15 p.m. at the Aquinas Performing Arts Center in Grand Rapids, hosted by the World Affairs Council of Western Michigan. The discussion will feature Mr. Ronald Neuman, former ambassador to Afghanistan. Tickets are free with a WMU ID, $10 general admission. Open to the public. Information. 

Tuesday, March 14

  • Volunteering with International Students—10:30 to 2 p.m. at the Kalamazoo Gospel Mission, hosted by WMU International Student Activities. Join international students as they give back to the Kalamazoo community. Register in-person in rooms 3516, 3521, or 3530 of Ellsworth Hall or via email at intl-outreach@wmich.edu. Free and open to the public. Information.
  • International Ladies Sports Club—4 to 5 p.m. in the WMU Student Recreation Center, hosted by WMU International Student Activities. Join female international students for an hour of exercise the second and fourth Tuesday of each month of the Spring 2017 semester. Registration is $5 and includes a t-shirt. Open to the public. Information.

Wednesday, March 15

  • "Using Fashion and Spirituality to Build Cross-Cultural Love" Lecture—noon to 1 p.m. in the Lee Honors College Lounge, hosted by the Lee Honor's College Spring 2017 Lyceum Lecture Series. The lecture will be given by Zarinah El-Amin Naeem, founder of Beautifully Wrapped and the Headwrap Expo. Free and open to the public. Information.

Thursday, March 16

  • "How to Make Chinese Cities Skilled" lecture—4 p.m. in 1028 Brown Hall, hosted by the Haenicke Institute for Global Education, the WMU Timothy Light Center for Chinese Studies, the Confucius Institute at WMU, the WMU Department of Economics, and Kalamazoo Valley College. The lecture will be given by Dr. Shihe Fu, Fulbright scholar and professor of economics at Southwestern University of Finance and Economics. Information.
  • Learn about teaching English abroad—4 p.m. in 3025 Brown Hall, hosted by the global and international studies program. This informational panel will discuss opportunities for teaching English overseas. Free and open to the public. Information.
  • “Rigoberta Menchú: Daughter of the Maya” film viewing—6 to 8 p.m. at the Kalamazoo First Congregational UCC, hosted by Great Lakes PeaceJam. This film tells the story of the 1992 Nobel Peace Prize winner and how she survived genocide in Guatemala to become a voice for indigenous peoples throughout the world. Free and open to the public. Information.

Friday, March 17

  • "Putting 'Gender Revolution' into Practice: A Workshop with Dr. sj Miller" screening and discussion—10 to noon in 3045 Brown Hall, hosted by the WMU Department of English. The discussion will feature Dr. sj Miller, the deputy director of educational equity supports and services at NYU's Metropolitan Center for Research on Equity and Transformation of Schools. Pizza and beverages provided. Free and open to the public; registration required to cnagle@wmich.edu. Information.

Monday, March 20

  • "Is it all Politics?: Trade and U.S. jobs" Great Decisions Global Discussion Series—6 to 7:15 p.m. at the Aquinas Performing Arts Center in Grand Rapids, hosted by the World Affairs Council of Western Michigan. The discussion will feature Jeremy Haft, professor at Georgetown University and CEO of SafeSource Trading. Tickets are free with a WMU ID, $10 general admission. Open to the public. Information. 

Tuesday, March 21

  • Office of Diversity and Inclusion open house—11 to 6 p.m. in the Trimpe Building, hosted by the WMU Office for Diversity and Inclusion. The open house will give the campus a chance to learn more about the Office of Diversity and Inclusion with activities, presentations, and giveaways. Free and open to the public. Information.
  • "The Empress' Gaze: Roman Women and Desire in History and Film" seminar—4 to 6 p.m. in 3025 Brown Hall, hosted by the WMU Women's Caucus. The seminar will feature Dr. Anise Strong, professor of History at WMU. Free and open to the public. Information. 

Wednesday, March 22

  • "SHARE Out: You and Why Race Matters" lecture—noon to 1 p.m. in the Lee Honors College Lounge, hosted by the Lee Honor's College Spring 2017 Lyceum Lecture Series. The lecture will be given by Maime Butler and Jacob Pinney-Johnson of the Society for History and Racial Equity. Free and open to the public. Information.
  • "The Climate Crisis: Trump vs. Truth" teach-in—7 to 8:30 p.m. in 157 Bernhard Center, sponsored by the Interdisciplinary Climate Change Working Group, the Humanities Center, the Department of Biological Sciences, the Institute of the Environment and Sustainability, and the WMU Change RSO. The teach-in will address how climate change policy will affect WMU students, Kalamazoo residents, and people around the world. Free and open to the public. Information.  

Thursday, March 23

  • Volunteering with international students—10:30 to 11:45 a.m. at the KRESA West Campus Head Start, hosted by International Student Activities. Join international students as they give back to the Kalamazoo community by reading stories to head-start students from all over the world. Register in-person in 3516, 3521, or 3530 Ellsworth Hall or via email at intl-outreach@wmich.edu. Free and open to the public. Information.
  • Board games with CELCIS students—2 to 3 p.m. in the fourth-floor CELCIS Lobby of Ellsworth Hall, hosted by the Center for English Language and Culture for International Students. Join CELCIS students as they learn to play U.S. American card and board games, chat with friends, hang out and meet new people! Free and open to the public. Information.

Friday, March 24

  • "Protecting People and Planet: An Indigenous Perspective" public talk—7 p.m. in the Shaw Theatre at the Gilmore Theatre Complex, hosted by Great Lakes PeaceJam and Western Michigan University. The talk will be given by Nobel Peace Prize winner Rigoberta Menchú Tum at the Great Lakes PeaceJam Youth Conference at WMU. Free and open to the public. Information.

Saturday, March 25

  • Western World Cup—1 to 7 p.m. at the WMU Student Recreation Center, hosted by International Student Activities. Teams with a minimum of eight players are invited to participate in the Western World Cup, a soccer tournament that seeks the best soccer team on campus. Registration is $5; deadline to register is March 21; register in 3516 or 3521 Ellsworth Hall. Open to the public. Information.
  • Great Lakes PeaceJam Youth Conference—daily March 25 and March 26 at Western Michigan University, hosted by Great Lakes PeaceJam and Western Michigan University. The event will bring together more than 300 high school and college-aged youth from the Midwest for two days of learning about social justice. WMU student volunteers are needed to serve as mentors which involves facilitating small groups of high school participants during the event. To volunteer, contact program director Shannon Sykes at greatlakes@peacejam.org. Information.
  • Model UN Conference for high school students—three-day event at Western Michigan University, hosted by the WMU Model United Nations Club. High school students from around Michigan, Indiana, and Ohio are invited to simulate United Nations activities and introduce potential future students to Western's campus. Open to high school students in the Midwest. Information. 

Monday, March 27

  • International Women's Day: Being Bold for a Change—5:30 to 8 p.m. at Sister of St. Joseph, 936 Lake St, Kalamazoo, hosted by the Intrepid Professional Women Network. Join for a global day celebrating the social, economic, cultural, and political achievements of women. Free and open to the public. Information.
  • "The EU: An Uncertain Future" Great Discussions Global Discussion Series—6 to 7:15 p.m. at the Aquinas Performing Arts Center, 1703 Robinson Rd SE, Grand Rapids, hosted by the World Affairs Council of Western Michigan. The discussion will feature Dr. John McCormick, professor of European Union politics at the University of Indiana-Purdue. Tickets are $10. Open to the public. Information. 

Tuesday, March 28

  • "Human Trafficking: When Global Meets Local" panel—12:30 to 1:30 p.m. in 204 Bernhard, hosted by the Global and International Studies Program. The panel will include staff from Firekeepers Casino, the YWCA, and the Kalamazoo Anti-Human Trafficking Coalition. Free and open to the public. Information. 

Thursday, March 30

  • "Is There Really a 'Gap' Between Political Science and Policy? Exploring the Links Between IR Scholarship and U.S. Foreign Policy" lecture—3:30 to 5 p.m. in the third-floor library in Friedmann Hall, hosted by the Department of Political Sciences' Samuel L. Clark Lecture Series. The lecture will be given by Dr. Ido Oren, professor of political science at the University of Florida. Free and open to the public. Information.
  • Board games with CELCIS students—2 to 3 p.m. in the fourth-floor CELCIS Lobby of Ellsworth Hall, hosted by the Center for English Language and Culture for International Students. Join CELCIS students as they learn to play U.S. American card and board games, chat with friends, hang out and meet new people! Free and open to the public. Information.
  • "WMD, WMD, WMD: How the Incantation of Ambiguous Phrases Creates Foreign Threats" lecture—7 to 9 p.m. in 157-158 Bernhard Center, hosted by the Department of Political Science. The lecture will be given by Dr. Ido Oren, associate professor of political science at the University of Florida. Free and open to the public. Information. 
  • "How to Travel Through the World's Paintbox—7 to 9 p.m. in 1910 Sangren Hall, hosted by the Center for Humanities. The talk with feature  Victoria Finlay, a popular nonfiction author. Free and open to the public Information.

Friday, March 31

  • Department of World Languages and Literatures award ceremony—3 p.m. in 208-209 Bernhard Center at Western Michigan University, hosted by the Department of World Languages and Literatures. Join as students and faculty are recognized for their role in the Department of World Languages and Literatures. Free and open to the public. Information. 

February 2017

Thursday, Feb 2

  • "The Unifying Power of Education" Panel—6 p.m. in room 213 of the Bernhard Center, hosted by the WMU Center for the Study of Ethics in Society. The panel is part of the 2017 Martin Luther King Day Jr. Celebrations and is hosted by Keagan Potts, graduate assistant in the WMU Philosophy Department. Free and open to the public. Information.

Friday, Feb 3

  • Japanese Conversation Table—4 to 5 p.m. in the Bernhard Center Cafeteria (main floor), hosted by the Soga Japan Center. This is a free opportunity to practice your Japanese language skills! To register, send an email to Michiko Yoshimoto that includes your name and Japanese level at Michiko.yoshimoto@wmich.edu. Free and open to the public. Information. 

Tuesday, Feb 7

  • International Ladies Sports Club—4 to 5 p.m. in the WMU Student Recreation Center, hosted by WMU International Student Activities. Join female international students for an hour of exercise the second and fourth Tuesday of each month of the Spring 2017 semester. Registration is $5 and includes a t-shirt. Open to the public. Information.
  • "Student Success and Career Chinese" Talk—4 p.m. in 1028 Brown Hall, hosted by the Timothy Light Center for Chinese Studies in the WMU Haenicke Institute for Global Education. WMU professor and Chinese program director, Dr. Xiaojun Wang, will present an integrated approach to developing a new text book series: Career Chinese--Bridging Gaps for Success. Free and open to the public. Information. 

Wednesday, Feb 8

  • “Organizing To Prevent Violence and Build Peace: The Transformative Potential of Everyday Citizens in West Africa and Central America” Lecture—6:30 p.m. in 2028 Brown Hall, hosted by the WMU Center for the Study of Ethics in Society and the WMU School of Communication. The lecture will be given by Stacey Connaughton from the Purdue Peace Project as part of the 2016-17 Visiting Scholars and Artists Program. Coffee and dessert will be provided after the talk in 2026 Brown Hall. Free and Open to the Public. Information.

Thursday, Feb 9

  • "Better Get to Know an Alum - Americorps and Peacecorps" Open Forum—4 to 5 p.m. in 3025 Brown Hall, hosted by the WMU global and international studies program. Global and international studies graduate, Matt Pruitt, will be discussing his transition from WMU graduate to his volunteer work with AmeriCorps and PeaceCorps. Free and open to the public. Information.

Friday, Feb 10

  • International Night at the Palace of Auburn Hills with international students—3 to midnight at the Palace of Auburn Hills, hosted by WMU International Student Activities. Join international students as they experience a US professional basketball game. Registration is $60 and includes transportation. Open to the public. Information

  • Deadline for Timothy Light Center for Chinese Studies Research Grant—midnight, hosted by the Timothy Light Center for Chinese Studies in the WMU Haenicke Institute for Global Education. All WMU board-appointed, full-time faculty members are eligible to apply. Information.
  • Japanese Cooking Classes (Registration Full)—1:30 to 4 p.m. in Kanley Chapel, hosted by the WMU Soga Japan Center. Participants will learn how to cook two traditional Japanese dishes: Gyudon and Daifuku. Registration is $5 and includes all ingredients. Open to the public. Information.

Thursday, Feb 16

  • Bowling with CELCIS Students—4 to 7:30 p.m. at Pinz Kalamazoo, hosted by the Center for English Language and Culture for International Students. Join CELCIS students as they learn about the sport of bowling. Registration is $5 and includes food and beverages. Open to the public. Information. 
  • International Film Night Screening: "The Young Girls of Rochefort"—6:30 to 8:30 p.m. in 1028 Brown Hall, hosted by the WMU French program. The film follows twin sisters as they leave their small seaside town of Rochefort in search of romance. Hired as carnival singers, one falls for an American musician, while the other must search for her ideal partner. Free and open to the public. Information.
  • International Film Night Screening: "The Band's Visit"—7 to 10 p.m. in 2028 Brown Hall, hosted by the Sigma Iota Rho, Zeta Phi Chapter. Eight Egyptian musicians arrive by mistake in a small town in Israel's Negez Desert. With no transportation out of the town or any hotels to stay in, the band is in for a cultural awakening. Free and open to the public. Information.

Friday, Feb 17

  • Spring Convocation: Recognition of Discovery, Diversity, and Global Engagement—3:30 to 4:30 p.m. in the Fetzer Center Kirsch Auditorium, hosted by Western Michigan University. Join WMU in recognizing staff and faculty in the areas of discovery, diversity, and global engagement. Free and open to the public. Information.
  • Japanese Cooking Classes (Registration Full)—1:30 to 4 p.m. in Kanley Chapel, hosted by the WMU Soga Japan Center. Participants will learn how to cook two traditional Japanese dishes: Gyudon and Daifuku. Registration is $5 and includes all ingredients. Open to the public. Information.

Saturday, Feb 18

  • Kalamazoo Region Conversation on Respecting Diversity—8:30 to 12:30 p.m. in the Fetzer Center at Western Michigan University, hosted by Western Michigan University, the City of Portage, and the Asian Pacific American Affairs Commission. This talk presents a conversation to reaffirm the regional commitment to embracing the unique American value of respecting diversity. Four discussion panels will feature law enforcement, state regulators, education professionals, and elected officials. Free and open to the public. Information.

Monday, Feb 20

  • "Mistresses, Slaves, and Roman Religious Rituals" Lecture—noon to 1:30 p.m. in 2302 Freidmann Hall, hosted by the WMU Department of History. The lecture will be given by Dr. Anise Strong, WMU assistant professor of history. Free and open to the public. Information.

Tuesday, Feb 21

  • Discover WMU with International Students: Reindeer Ranch—day event, hosted by WMU International Student Activities. Join international students as they learn about one of the things that makes the West Michigan community special. Registration is $5. Open to the public. Information.

Wednesday, Feb 22

  • “How to Take on Hate: A Dialogue on Islamophobia and Racism" Lecture—12 to 1 p.m. in the Lee Honors College Lounge, hosted by the Lee Honor's College Spring 2017 Lyceum Lecture Series. The lecture will be given by Asha Noor from the Arab American Center for Community and Social Services in Dearborn, Michigan and Alisa Perkins WMU Assistant Professor of comparative religion. Free and open to the public. Information.
  • "Identity in the Media" Real Talk Diversity Series—6 to 7:30 p.m. in the Trimpe Building Multicultural Center, hosted by the Office of Diversity and Inclusion. The talk will be given by Dr. Sue Ellen Christian, WMU professor of communication. Free and open to the public. Information.
  • You Are Welcome Here: Town Hall—6 to 8 p.m. in 1920 Sangren Hall, hosted by the Haenicke Institute for Global Education. The Haenicke Institute invites WMU and Kalamazoo community to a Town Hall to discuss the current state of affairs for our students and community, what we can do to remain a welcoming community, and what opportunities exist to get involved. Free and open to the public. Information.
  • Mediterranean Coastal Dinner in WMU Dining Centers—evening dining hours in all WMU Dining Halls, hosted by Western Michigan University Dining Services. Enjoy cuisine such as Syrian meatballs, Greek chicken, Algerian couscous, and more. A full menu is online. Open to the public. Information.

Thursday, Feb 23

  • "Challenges of Translating Poetry" Lecture—3 to 5 p.m. in 3025 Brown Hall, hosted by the WMU Department of World Languages and Literatures. The lecture will be given by Latvian poet and translator Juris Kronsbergs and discuss the challenges of translating poetry as well as the role of poetry in exile during the era of the Soviet Union. Information. 

Friday, Feb 24

  • Biennial Diversity and Inclusion Conference—9 to 3:30 p.m. in the College of Health and Human Services, hosted by CHHS. The theme of this year's conference is "Health and Well-Being within a Diverse Health Community." Open to the public; registration required. Information.
  • "Engineers Without Borders: Moving the Norm" Talk—1 p.m. in Floyd Hall of the WMU Parkview campus, hosted by the College of Engineering and Applied Sciences. The Michigan representative for Engineers Without Borders, Mr. Bruce Nieman, will give a talk on the importance of the organization. Free and open to the public. Information.
  • Japanese Cooking Classes (Registration Full)—1:30 to 4 p.m. in Kanley Chapel, hosted by the WMU Soga Japan Center. Participants will learn how to cook two traditional Japanese dishes: Gyudon and Daifuku. Registration is $5 and includes all ingredients. Open to the public. Information.

Saturday, Feb 25

  • Ski Trip with international students (Canceled)—day event, hosted by WMU International Student Activities. Join international students for a day of skiing! Registration is $30 and includes transportation. Open to the public. Information.

Sunday, Feb 26

  • "Israel's Wars with Hamas: Dilemmas of Asymmetric Conflicts" Lecture—7 p.m. in the Mandelle Hall Olmsted Room at Kalamazoo College, hosted by K College Jewish Studies, International Area Studies, and Academic Engagement Network. The lecture will be given by Dr. Yael Aronoff, associate professor and director of the Jewish Studies Program at Michigan State University. Free and open to the public. Information.

Monday, Feb 27

  • Post-It Welcome Effort Kick-Off—daily in Western Michigan University Libraries, hosted by WMU Libraries and the Haenicke Institute for Global Education. University libraries across campus will invite everyone to leave welcoming post-it messages on a welcome board near the entrance. Free and open to the public. Information. 

Tuesday, Feb 28

  • Deadline for Summer I Study Abroad Applications—midnight, hosted by WMU Study Abroad. Students can browse study abroad programs and apply online. Information.
  • International Ladies Sports Club—4 to 5 p.m. in the WMU Student Recreation Center, hosted by WMU International Student Activities. Join female international students for an hour of exercise the second and fourth Tuesday of each month of the Spring 2017 semester. Registration is $5 and includes a t-shirt. Open to the public. Information.
  • The African Children's Choir Concert—6:30 to 8 p.m. at the St. Michael Lutheran Church in Portage, hosted by St. Michael Lutheran Church of Portage. The African Children's choir is composed of African children, aged 7 to 10 years old. Many have lost one or both parents. The choir performs well-loved children's songs, hand-clapping, traditional African spirituals, and contemporary tunes. Free and open to the public; donations encouraged. Information.

January 2017

Thursday, Jan 5-6

  • International Student Orientation and Registration Program—Jan 5 to Jan 6, hosted by the Haenicke Institute for Global Education. HIGE welcomes new international students to campus Jan 5-6. We thank you in advance for your help in making our new students feel welcome at WMU. Information.

Monday, Jan 9

  • WMU Study Abroad Classroom Presentation Initiative—ongoing, hosted by WMU Study Abroad. The beginning of the Spring 2017 semester means a return to the WMU Study Abroad classroom outreach initiative. WMU is a proud partner of the Generation Study Abroad national initiative which aims to double the number of students studying abroad by 2020.  Reaching students through classroom presentations is one of the most successful outreach strategies in working toward this goal. Fill out a classroom presentation request to invite WMU Study abroad to present in your classroom. Information.

Monday, Jan 9-13

  • Call for CELCIS Conversation Circle Leaders—Jan 9 to Jan 13, hosted by the Center for English Language and Culture for International Students. CELCIS conversation circles are designed to help international students make connections with other students and practice conversational English. Conversation Circle leaders meet weekly with a group of international and domestic students to facilitate discussions on dynamic topics. Paid position open to the public; contact thomas.marks@wmich.edu to apply. Information.

Wednesday, Jan 11

  • College of Arts and Sciences Study Abroad Expo—11 to 2 p.m. in Brown Hall, hosted by WMU Study Abroad and the College of Arts and Sciences. The 2017 CAS Study Abroad Expo will highlight short-term faculty-led programs before the Summer I application deadline on January 31 and the Summer II application deadline on February 28. Free and open to the public. Information.

Thursday, Jan 12

  • Call for CELCIS Conversation Circle Leaders—Jan 9 to Jan 13, hosted by the Center for English Language and Culture for International Students. CELCIS conversation circles are designed to help international students make connections with other students and practice conversational English. Paid positions open to the public; contact thomas.marks@wmich.edu to apply. Information.
  • Applications open for English-Japanese Language Partners—Jan 12 to Jan 20, hosted by the Soga Japan Center. The English–Japanese Language Partners program is for Western Michigan University students (native speakers of either language) and offers an opportunity to practice Japanese and English outside of the classroom. The deadline to apply is Friday, January 20 for Spring 2017. Free and open to the public. Information.
  • Registration opens for Chinese Culture Classes—Jan 12 to Jan 30, hosted by the Confucius Institute at WMU. Registration is open for a selection of Chinese culture courses, taught in English, designed for personal enrichment rather than academic credit. Low-cost and open to the public. Information.

Friday, Jan 13

  • Applications open for Gilman Scholarship—Jan 13 to March 1, hosted by the Institute of International Education. The Gilman International Scholarship Program offers grants for undergraduate students who are recipients Federal Pell Grant Funding. Eligible students should contact the WMU Gilman Advisor, Dr. Michelle Metro-Roland, at michelle.metro-roland@wmich.edu. Information.
  • "The Impact of Latino-Owned Business Employment Share on Local Economic Performance:  A Sector-Level Assessment Based on the Confidential Census Data" Research Seminar—3 to 4:30 p.m. in 2212 Dunbar Hall, hosted by the WMU Department of Economics. The research seminar will feature Dr. Scott Loveridge, professor in the Department of Agricultural Food and Resource Economics at Michigan State University. Free and open to the public. Information.

Monday, Jan 16

  • Martin Luther King Day Global Sessions: “Addressing threats to justice, the climate, and civil rights”—10 to 3 p.m. in the Bernhard Center room 208, hosted by WMU’s Dr. Allen Webb and Dr. Lewis Pyenson on behalf of an organizing committee of professors and students, the Lewis Walker Institute for the Study of Race and Ethnic Relations, and the Frostic School of Art. Sessions combine short inspirational speeches, focused discussion, action plans, and connections to students, faculty, and community organizations. Topics include immigration and citizenship, Islamophobia, and supporting refugees in Kalamazoo. Free and open to the public. Information.

Tuesday, Jan 17

  • College of Education and Human Development Study Abroad Expo—11 to 2 p.m. in the Sangren Atrium, hosted by WMU Study Abroad and the College of Education and Human Development. The 2017 CEHD Study Abroad Expo will highlight short-term faculty-led programs before the Summer I application deadline on January 31 and the Summer II application deadline on February 28. Free and open to the public. Information.

Wednesday, Jan 18

  • College of Health and Human Services Study Abroad Expo—11 to 2 p.m. in the CHHS Atrium, hosted by WMU Study Abroad and the College of Health and Human Services. The 2017 CHHS Study Abroad Expo will highlight short-term faculty-led programs before the Summer I application deadline on January 31 and the Summer II application deadline on February 28. Free and open to the public. Information.

Friday, Jan 20

  • Night of Rafiki—7 to 9 p.m. in Rooms 208 and 209 of the Bernhard Center, hosted by WMU International Student Activities and the Western Student Association. This night offers a chance for international students and domestic students to get to know one another, create friendships, and welcome each other to campus through a fun game night. The event includes crafts, music, and snacks. Free and open to the public. Information.
  • Japanese Conversation Table—4 to 5 p.m. in the Bernhard Center Cafeteria (main floor), hosted by the Soga Japan Center. This is a free opportunity to practice your Japanese language skills! To register, send an email to Michiko Yoshimoto that includes your name and Japanese level at Michiko.yoshimoto@wmich.edu. Free and open to the public. Information. 
  • "The Conditional Gini: Estimation and Application to the Relationship between Wealth, Financial Use, and Income Equality" Research Seminar—3 to 4:30 p.m. in 2212 Dunbar Hall, hosted by the WMU Department of Economics. The research seminar will feature Dr. Christian Ahlin, Associate professor in the Department of Economics at Michigan State University. Free and open to the public. Information.

Saturday, Jan 21

  • CANCELED DUE TO NO SNOW
    Winter Fun at Echo Valley with CELCIS Students—day event at Echo Valley in Kalamazoo, hosted by the Center for English Language and Culture for International Students. Join CELCIS students for a day of skiing and sledding at Echo Valley! Open to the public. Information.

Friday, Jan 27

  • Japanese Conversation Table—4 to 5 p.m. in the Bernhard Center Cafeteria (main floor), hosted by the Soga Japan Center. This is a free opportunity to practice your Japanese language skills! To register, send an email to Michiko Yoshimoto that includes your name and Japanese level at Michiko.yoshimoto@wmich.edu. Free and open to the public. Information. 
  • "Harnessing Democratic Dividend in Ethiopia" Research Seminar—3 to 4:30 p.m. in 2212 Dunbar Hall, hosted by the WMU Department of Economics. The research seminar will feature Dr. Terefe Degefa, Fulbright Scholar and Associate Professor at Addis Ababa University, Ethiopia. Free and open to the public. Information.

Saturday, Jan 28

  • Kalamazoo Chinese New Year Celebration—7 to 8:30 p.m. in the Chenery Auditorium, Kalamazoo, hosted by the Chinese Association of Greater Kalamazoo. The event will feature live performances, dancing, and activities from China. Low cost and open to the public. Information.

Tuesday, Jan 31

  • Grand Opening of the WMU Global Lounge—3 to 5 p.m. in the Bernhard Center Global Lounge (lower level), hosted by the Haenicke Institute for Global Education and the Bernhard Center. A grand opening of the Global Lounge space in the lower level of the Bernhard Center. The event will feature live student performances, raffles, and free food. Free and open to the public. 

DECEMBER 2016

Thursday, Dec 1

  • Cultural Celebration—Kwanzaa Celebration, a celebration to honor Kwanzaa and includes traditional Kwanzaa foods and an explanation of the meaning of this holiday tradition.  Hosted by the Division of Multicultural Affairs and the Office for Diversity and Inclusion, 11:30 to 1:30 p.m., Multicultural Center of the Adrian Trimpe Building. Free and open to the public. Information.
  • International Education Week—American Thanksgiving Celebration, a celebration that will provide an overview of the history of Thanksgiving in the United States and feature a "somewhat" typical Thanksgiving dinner. Hosted by the International Student Fellowship, noon to 2 p.m., Kanley Chapel. Free and open to the public. Information.

Friday, Dec 2

  • Cultural Workshop—Chinese Kotting Workshop, a workshop to discuss and teach the traditional decorative handcraft from China. Hosted by the Confucius Institute at WMU, 2:30 - 4 p.m., 3010 Brown Hall. Register online; free and open to the public. Information.

Saturday, Dec 3

  • International Involvement—"A Christmas Story" with CELCIS students, an opportunity to join CELCIS students for the telling of a classic U.S. American tale. Sponsored by WMU CELCIS, 7 to 10 p.m., the Civic Theater, Kalamazoo. Tickets available for purchase in the CELCIS office, $5. Information.

Sunday, Dec 4

  • International Performance—The Gilmore Rising Star Series: Pavel Kolesnikov, Russian pianist Pavel Kolesnikov performs in Downtown Kalamazoo. Sponsored by Three Rivers Friends of The Gilmore, 4 to 6 p.m., Wellspring Theatre, Kalamazoo. Tickets available for purchase, $25. Information.

Monday, Dec 5

  • Study Abroad Information Tables—A series of information tables to answer questions about study abroad and hand out exam care packages. Hosted by WMU Study Abroad and the Study Abroad Alumni Ambassador program, Dec 5-13, 10 to 2 p.m., Bernhard Center 1st floor. Information.

Sunday, Dec 11

  • International Study Zone—A series of study sessions for students looking for a quiet place to study; hot chocolate provided. Hosted by International Student Activities, Dec 11-13, 3 to 5 p.m., Global Lounge in Bernhard Center. Information.

Tuesday, Dec 13

  • International Webinar—"International Strategies for International Student Enrollment and Success," a series of case studies that highlight the increasingly competitive landscape of international student recruitment and the resulting wave of innovation and exploration of promising practices. Hosted by the Haenicke Institute for Global Education, 2-3 p.m., 2720 Sangren Hall. Free and open to the public. Information. 

NOVEMBER 2016

Saturday, Nov 12

  • International Education Week—A collection of events on campus highlighting international students and culture. Nov 12 - 23. Free and open to the public. Information.

Tuesday, Nov 15

  • Panel Discussion—"What the Heck Just Happened? Where Do We Go From Here?" A panel discussion on the 2016 elections, 12:00 p.m., Friedmann 3301. Free and open to the public. Information. 

Wednesday, Nov 16 

  • Lecture—"Measuring Chinese Business Cycles and Financial Stress," Dr. C. James Hueng, 4:30 p.m., 2028 Brown Hall. Free and open to the public. Information.

Wednesday, Nov 23

  • International Workshop—"Religion and Civil Society: Cooperation between the American and Slavic World" November 23-24 Yalta, Livadia, Republic of Crimea. Free and open to the public. Information
  • International Education Week—"Legally Desi," a celebration of Indian cultures that includes dancing, music, and a traditional dinner. Hosted by the Indian Student Association, 6 to 9 p.m., Wesley Foundation. Free and open to the public. Information.

Tuesday, Nov 29

  • International Film—"Kirschblueten (Cherry Blossoms)," part of the German Film Series. Hosted by the WMU German Club, 7 p.m., 1002 Brown Hall. Free and open to the public. Information. 

Wednesday, Nov 30

  • Lecture—"Global Health and Water," an installment of the Lyceum Lecture Series presented by Dr. Richard Roach, Homer Stryker M.D. School of Medicine. Hosted by the Lee Honors College, noon to 1 p.m., Lee Honors College lounge. Free and open to the public. Information.
  • Lecture—"The Economic and Fiscal Impacts of Immigration: Implications for Policy," an installment of the Werner Sichel Lecture Series presented by by Dr. Pia M. Orrenius, Vice President and Senior Economist, Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas. Hosted by the Department of Economics, noon to 1:15 p.m., 2028 Brown Hall. Free and open to the public.  Information.

OCTOBER 2016

Saturday, Oct. 1

  • China Festival—12 to 5 p.m., Western Michigan University, Student Recreation Center. Information.

Monday, Oct. 3

  • Lecture—"Art, Ritual, and Secret Space on the Silk Road," Dr. Qiang Ning, 4:30 p.m., 2028 Brown Hall. Information.

Thursday, Oct. 6

  • Lecture—"Global Horizons: A Career in the Foreign Service," Michael Riedel, 4 p.m., 3025 Brown Hall. Information.

Saturday, Oct. 8

  • International Homecoming Alumni Reunion—Varied WMU campus sites and times. Information

Thursday, Oct 20

  • Lecture—"China and Inner Asia before the "Silk Routes": Reviewing some possible instances of cultural borrowings," Dr. Lothar Von Falkenhausen, 4:30 p.m., 2028 Brown Hall. Information.

Monday, Oct 24

  • Lecture—“Stained Glass Windows of the Burgos Cathedral: World Heritage,” Dr. María Pilar Alonso Abad, 4 p.m., 2028 Brown Hall. Information.
  • Lecture—"Better Get to Known an Alum: From Peace Corps to Refugee Work," Matt Pruitt, 4 p.m., 3025 Brown Hall. Information.

Tuesday, Oct 25

  • WMU Secretary of State Day—9 a.m. to 3 p.m.The Michigan SOS will bring their Mobile Branch Office to campus to provide services to WMU international and domestic students. For information email Intl-Activities@wmich.edu.

Friday, Oct 28

  • Halloween Dance—7 to 11 p.m. Hosted by International Student Activities. Information.

Saturday, Oct 29

  • Haunted House Trip—Arranged by the WMU Center for English Language and Culture for International Students. Information.

SEPTEMBER 2016

 Wednesday, Sept. 28

  • Study Abroad Fair—11 a.m. to 3 p.m., Western Michigan University, Sangren Mall plaza. Information.

JULY 2016

Saturday, July 2

  • Exhibition: Reaching into Infinity: Korean artist Chul Hyun Ahn creates sculptures utilizing light, color, and illusion as physical representations of his investigation of infinite space. Runs through Nov. 6. Kalamazoo Institute of Arts. Information.

Monday, July 4

  • U.S. Independence Day—WMU closed.

Wednesday, July 6

  • EID al Fitr begins at sundown.

Wednesday, July 13

  • ISA Barbecue—free and open to all WMU students, 5 to 7:30 p.m. Hosted by WMU's International Student Activities office. Information.
  • Walker Institute Film Festival screening—Harvest of Empire (2012). Examination of the relationship between the long history of U.S. intervention in Latin American and the immigration crisis of today, 6 p.m., Kalamazoo Public Library. Information.

JUNE 2016

Tuesday, June 14

  • Confucius Institute Culture Workshop—Chinese Knotting, 6 to 7:30 p.m., 4048 Brown Hall. Information.

Thursday, June 30 to Saturday July 2

  • SPLICE—Summer Electronic Music Festival. Dalton Recital Hall. Information.

MAY 2016

Monday, May 2

  • "Atlanta Summit: Global Health and Refugees," participate via webinar, 8:30 a.m. to 3 p.m., hosted by the World Affairs Council of Western Michigan. Registration required. Information.

APRIL 2016

Friday, April 1

  • Career Event—"Aviation Outlook Day 2016," 10 a.m. to 3 p.m., Battle Creek Aviation Education Center, 237 Helmer Rd N, Battle Creek. Information. 

Saturday, April 2

  • Scholarship fundraising dinner—"Celebrating the Legacy of César E. Chávez," 6 p.m. Fetzer Center. Registration required. Information. 

Sunday, April 3

  • "International Festival," 4 to 8 p.m., Bernhard Center second floor. Information. 

Tuesday, April 5

  • Lecture—"Inequality and Democratic Survival," Dr. David Samuels, 3:30 p.m., 3301 Friedmann Hall. Information. 
  • Lecture—"Changing Brazil - A Glass Half Full?" Dr. David Samuels, 7 p.m., 3301 Friedmann Hall. Information. 

Wednesday, April 6

  • Our Blue Marble--Water, Home, and Humanity (Part I) — "Multimodal Trails on the Great Lakes," Dr. Dave Lemberg, noon to 1 pm, Lee Honors College Lounge. Information.
  • Lecture—"Cross-Strait Relations after Taiwan's 2016 Elections," Dr. Chen-yuan Tung, 5 p.m., 2028 Brown Hall. Information. 

Thursday, April 7

  • Career Event—"GTRI STEM Job Fair," 9 a.m. to noon, Henry Ford College–5101 Evergreen Rd, Dearborn. Information.
  • Manga Workshop—3:30 to 4:30 p.m., Kalamazoo Public Library, Eastwood Branch - Community Room. Information. 
  • Kalamazoo Islamic Center Visit—4 to 5:30 p.m. We'll gather in front of Waldo Library at 4 p.m. to take the short walk over together. Or, you can meet us at the Kalamazoo Islamic Center (parking available, program starts at 4:15 p.m., 1520 West Michigan Avenue). 
  • Burnham-Macmillan Speaker Series—"The Complex Terrain of Racialized Space: Nuances, Ambiguities and the Social Construction of Power," Dr. Martha Norkunas, Middle Tennessee State University, 4 p.m., 3502 Knauss Hall, reception to follow in 2500 Knauss Hall. Free. Information. 

Saturday, April 9

  • Manga Workshop—2 to 3:30 p.m., Kalamazoo Public Library, Central Library - Van Deusen Room. Information. 
  • Umoja African Night—Hosted by Chief Obi, 6 to 10 p.m., East Ballroom Bernhard Center. Information.

Monday, April 11

  • Lecture—"A Rite of Their Own: Japanese Buddhist Nuns and the Anan kōshiki," Dr. Barbara Ambros, UNC Chapel Hill, 2:30 to 3:30 p.m., University Humanities Center, Knauss Hall. Information. 

Tuesday, April 12

  • Real Talk Diversity Series—"Stand Up: Short Play Addressing Privilege and Oppression," 6:30 to 8 p.m., Multicultural Center, Adrian Trimpe Building, refreshments provided.
  • Confucius Institute Culture Workshop—Chinese Cooking, 6 to 7:30 p.m., TBA. Information.

Wednesday, April 13

  • Career Event—"Education Career Fair 2016," 9 a.m. to 2:30 p.m., East Ballroom of the Bernhard Center. Information. 
  • Respecting Differences 2016—"Bridging the Generational Divide," Scott Zimmer of Bridgeworks, 9:30 a.m. and 2 p.m., Chenery Auditorium. Information. 
  • 52nd Werner Sichel Lecture Series 2015-16—“Trade, Migration and Growth: Evidence from China,” Professor Xiaodong Zhu,  noon to 1:15 p.m., 1028 Brown Hall. Information.
  • Our Blue Marble--Water, Home, and Humanity (Part I) — “Storm water Management Has Its Day: Examples from University Campus MS4 Permits,” Dr. Christe Alwin, noon to 1 pm, Lee Honors College Lounge. Information.
  • Lecture — "Pious Practice and Secular Constraints: Islam, Gender, and Europe's Muslim Crisis,"  Dr. Jeanette Jouili, 6 to 7:30 p.m., Fetzer Center. Information.

Friday, April 15

  • Reception—International Poetry Reception, 12 to 1:30 p.m., 1st floor Waldo Library. Information. 

Tuesday, April 19

  •  Confucius Institute Culture Workshop—Chinese Painting, 6 to 7:30 p.m., 4017 Brown Hall. Information.

Thursday, April 21

  • Islam in Global Perspectives Lecture—"The Tongue and the Pen: Two Takes on Reading and Writing in Islamicate North India," Dr. Tyler Williams, University of Chicago, 6 to 7:30 p.m., Fetzer Center. Information. 
  • Panel discussion—"The Syrian Refugee Crises: From Global to Local," 7 to 8:30 p.m., 1730 Sangren Hall. Information. 
  • CAB Carnival—Featuring food and activities including Bonzai Bikes, inflatable rock wall and slides, a mechanical bull, henna artists and more, presented by the Campus Activities Board and Western Student Association, 8 to 11 p.m., Student Recreation Center indoor tennis courts, Free for WMU students, $2 for others.

Saturday, April 23

  • High School Model United Nations Conference—Welcoming area high school UN clubs to participate in a UN simulation. 8 a.m. to 10 p.m., Sangren Hall. Information.

Sunday, April 24

  • High School Model United Nations Conference—Welcoming area high school UN clubs to participate in a UN simulation. 8 a.m. to 6 p.m., Sangren Hall. Information.

Monday April 26 through May 14

  • Irving S. Gilmore International Keyboard Festival, multiple locations. Information.

MARCH 2016

Tuesday, March 8

  • Real Talk Diversity Series—"Start Smart: Negotiating Your Salary and Closing the Gender Pay Gap," 6 to 8 p.m., Multicultural Center, Adrian Trimpe Building, refreshments provided.

Monday, March 14

  • Great Decisions Global Discussion Series—"Is Korean Reunification Possible?" Dr. James Person, 6 to 7:15 p.m., Aquinas College Performing Arts Center. 

Tuesday, March 15

  • Visiting Scholar Lecture—"Flexibility in Chinese Politics: The Role of Special Administrative Districts in the Frontier," Qingjun Peng, 3:30 p.m., Third Floor, Friedmann Hall. Information. 
  • Confucius Institute Culture Workshop—Chinese Paper Cutting, 6 to 7:30 p.m., 4017 Brown Hall. Information.

Wednesday, March 16

  • Our Blue Marble--Water, Home, and Humanity (Part I) —“Recent Developments in Watershed Hydrological Research and Future Directions,” Dr. Chansheng He, noon to 1 p.m., Lee Honors College Lounge. Information.

Thursday, March 17

  • CELCIS Meet and Greet, 1:15 to 2:30 p.m., 208-209 Bernhard Center. 

Saturday, March 19

  • Kalamazoo World Languages Film Festival—6 to 10 p.m., Alamo Draft House, 108 Portage St., Kalamazoo. Admission fees vary. 

Sunday, March 20

  • Kalamazoo World Languages Film Festival—4 to 8 p.m., Alamo Draft House, 108 Portage St., Kalamazoo. Admission fees vary. 

Monday, March 21

  • Reception and artists' talk—"Rhythms of Abstraction: Landscape Duets of Arnold Chang and Michael Cherney," 5:30 p.m., Kalamazoo Institute of Arts, 314 S. Park St, Kalamazoo. Free. RSVP by March 16 to museum@kiarts.org or (269) 349-7775. Information. 
  • Great Decisions Global Discussion Series—"ISIS: What Don't We Know?" Patrick Skinner, 6 to 7:15 p.m., Aquinas College Performing Arts Center. 
  • Guest lecture—"Medieval Islamic Maps," Dr. Karen C. Pinto, 6:30 to 7:30 p.m., Walwood Commons, Walwood Hall. Information.

Wednesday, March 23

  • Our Blue Marble--Water, Home, and Humanity (Part I) — “Environmental Effects and Recovery from a Major Diluted Bitumen (Tar Sands) Oil Spill into the Kalamazoo River, Michigan,” Dr. Stephen Hamilton, noon to 1 pm, Lee Honors College Lounge. Information.
  • Dalton Live and Interactive Series—Caladh Nua, Celtic music ensemble, 7:30 p.m., Dalton Center Recital Hall. 

Thursday, March 24

  • Lecture—"Producing Modern Muslims: Everyday Ethics in Colonial India," Dr. Farina Mir, 6 to 7:30 p.m., Fetzer Center. Information. 
  • Guest Artist Recital—Megumi Kanda, principal trombonist of the Milwaukee Symphony, 7:30 p.m., Dalton Center Recital Hall. Free admission. Information. 

Friday, March 25

  • Kalamazoo World Languages Film Festival—2 to 6 p.m., Alamo Draft House, 108 Portage St., Kalamazoo. Admission fees vary. 

Saturday, March 26

  • Kalamazoo World Languages Film Festival—2 to 6 p.m., Alamo Draft House, 108 Portage St., Kalamazoo. Admission fees vary.

Sunday, March 27

  • Kalamazoo World Languages Film Festival—2 to 6 p.m., Alamo Draft House, 108 Portage St., Kalamazoo. Admission fees vary.

Monday, March 28

  • Great Decisions Global Discussion Series—"Cuba and the U.S.: What Does the Future Hold?" Ambassador Charles Shapiro, 6 to 7:15 p.m., Aquinas College Performing Arts Center. 
  • Asian Forum at WMU, international conference, Fetzer Center, 8:30 to 6:15. Information.

Tuesday, March 29

  • Asian Forum at WMU, international conference. Information.
  • Loew Lecture in Medieval Studies—"Metamorphosed Bodies and Dead Letters: Ovid in Chaucer's Troilus and the Legend of Good Women," Suzanne Conklin Akbari, 11 a.m., Walwood Commons.
  • Lecture—"Islam and Gender: Contesting Liberal-secular Discourses," Dr. Tabassum F. Ruby, 3:30 p.m., 2500 Knauss Hall. Information. 
  • Performance—"Riverdance: The 20th Anniversary World Tour," 7:30 p.m., Miller Auditorium. Tickets: millerauditorium.com or . Information. 

Wednesday, March 30

  • 52nd Werner Sichel Lecture Series 2015-16—“Why is the Exit Right the Key to The Birth of China’s Land Market?,” Professor James Wen, noon to 1:15 p.m., 2028 Brown Hall. Information.
  • Our Blue Marble--Water, Home, and Humanity (Part I) — "Reimagining the Freshwater Heart of North America," Alison Swan, noon to 1 pm, Lee Honors College Lounge. Information.

Thursday, March 31

  • 22nd annual César Chávez March—Opening ceremony begins at 9:30 a.m. at Kalamazoo's Bronson Park, march will proceed to WMU's campus and an after-march program will begin at 11:30 a.m. in Miller Auditorium. Information. 
  • Lecture—"Democracy and Meritocracy in China and the United States," Dr. William Keech, 3:30 p.m., 3301 Friedmann Hall. Information. 
  • Guest lecture—"Merchants, Migrants, and Messengers: Crossing Borders in the Early Medieval Mediterranean," Sarah Davis-Secord, University of New Mexico, 7 p.m., Walwood Commons; reception to precede talk. Information. 

FEBRUARY 2016

Monday, February 1

  • Great Decisions Lecture—"It Isn't Funny: A Political Cartoonist in the Arab World," Isra El-beshir, 6  to 7:15 p.m., Aquinas College Performing Arts Center. Information. 

Tuesday, February 2

  • Gilman Scholarship for study abroad info session, 2 p.m., 4285 Ellsworth Hall. 

Wednesday, February 3

  • Our Blue Marble--Water, Home, and Humanity (Part I) — “The State of the Water State: Michigan Waters with a Focus on the Future of Agriculture,” James Clift, noon to 1 pm, Lee Honors College Lounge. Information.
  • It's Game on for Chinese New Year, 6 to 8 p.m., Wesley Foundation. Hosted by the Confucius Institute at WMU. Registration requested. Information.

Wednesday, February  17

  • Panel discussion—"Zika Virus," 12 p.m., 106 Bernhard Center. Information. 
  • Our Blue Marble--Water, Home, and Humanity (Part I) —  “Innovations in In-Situ Bioremediation of Organic Compounds,” Dr. Michael Barcelona, noon to 1 pm, Lee Honors College Lounge.  Information.

Friday, February 19

  • 2016 Diversity and Leadership Institute—1 to 6 p.m., Trimpe. Information. 

Saturday, February 20

  • Performance—Golden Dragon Acrobats Present Cirque Ziva, 8 p.m., Miller Auditorium. Information.

 JANUARY 2016

Thursday, January 28

  • Study abroad at Business Bash—"Business Bash with SLAB," 10:30 to 3 p.m., 1400 Schneider Hall.