Fall 2019 Honors College Course Catalog

Important Information:

March 12, 2019: Priority registration.

Aug. 28, 2019: Classes begin.

Sept. 4, 2019: Last day to drop or add classes.

Please note that the honors college dean does not receive course evaluation scores for any course that does not have the HNRS prefix and does not receive narrative comments for any course through the university's course evaluation system. We welcome and encourage your feedback on honors courses. All comments should be directed via email to Anthony Helms.

Grads lining up for the honors college cording ceremony.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Course Offerings:

ACTY 2100: Principles of Accounting I-HC

44261     MW     11:00 a.m. - 12:15 p.m.     1160 SCHDR     3 credit hours     James Penner
This is an introductory course in accounting, which includes an examination of the recording and reporting of business transactions, and the measurement of business income, assets, liabilities and equities. Emphasis is placed on financial reporting for decision-makers outside the organization.

ADA 2250: Drug Use: Personal and Social Impact - HC

42089     T     2:00 - 4:30 p.m.     1035 CHHS     3 credit hours     Tiffany Lee
*Note: This course satisfies General Education Area VIII: Health and Well-Being.
This course is designed to increase understanding of substance abuse, alcohol and other drug use through the public health disease model with an emphasis on psychological, physiological and social consequences of use and abuse. An overview of prevention, case finding and treatment strategies are provided.

ANTH 1500: Race, Biology, and Culture - HC

44269     W     6:00 - 8:30 p.m.     1014 LHC     3 credit hours     Dimitrios Papadopoulos
*Note: This course satisfies General Education Area VII: Natural Science and Technology: Applications and Implications.
This course is an introduction to the anthropological study of human biological variation in modern populations. We will examine from a biocultural perspective how human populations adapt to life in difficult environments (e.g., tropics, high altitude, arctic) and in so doing, we will explore the biological and social meanings of human racial variation.

A-S 1850: Introduction to Pre-Health Professions-HC    

45245     TR     6:00 - 7:50 p.m.     3508 KNAUS     2 credit hours     Megan Larson
*Note: This is a short course that only meets for the first seven weeks of the semester.
*Note: While it is intended for first-years, all new students are welcome to enroll in the class.
The goal of this seminar course is to introduce new Pre-Health Professions students to both the academic aspects of college (via Study Skills Seminars, etc) as well as the pathways towards fields in Healthcare (via panel discussions and a research project). This course prepares students to undertake and successfully manage the challenges and responsibilities of a Pre-Health Professions student. It is intended to (1) enhance students’ academic skills while focusing on engagement and a successful transition to the university setting; (2) focus on enhancing skills that pertain to college life; (3) focus on personal exploration; (4) help students begin to make decisions about their majors and careers, which can be intimidating choices for a first-year student.

BIOS 1100: Biological Sciences Lab- HC

40401     W     6:30 - 9:30     1107 WOOD     1 credit hour     Celene Jackson
*Note: Students must register for both the lecture and lab sections of this course.
*Note: In addition to the cost of a one credit class, there is a course fee of $30.
This lab provides hand-on experiences in environmental and human biology. Experiments will utilize scientific methods and instrumentation to collect, analyze, interpret data, and draw conclusions about life processes, basic biological principles, and the interaction of people and their environment.

BIOS 1120: Principles of Biology - HC

40407     MW       2:00 - 3:15 p.m.    3130 SANGN      3 credit hours    Doug Coulter
*Note: Students must register for both the lecture and lab sections of this course.
This introductory course summarizes the major areas in biological sciences of genetics, physiology, zoology, botany, microbiology, and ecology, all in an evolutionary context. Essential concepts of chemistry are introduced to explain modern biological principles. Wherever possible, the human model is used to explain important aspects of reproduction, physiology, and genetics. Both botany and ecology are included in this course survey because plants are essential for aerobic life processes on earth, and these relationships are best identified by ecological concepts. Class time will consist of lecture and discussion. There will be several hour exams and a final exam including a comprehensive component based on questions from the previous exams.

BIOS 1610: Molecular and Cellular Biology - HC

43387     TR     2:00 - 3:15 p.m.     1718 WOOD     4 credit hours     John Geiser
*Prerequisites: BIOS 1600 or CHEG 2960 (CHEG 2960 may be taken concurrently); with a grade of “C” or better in all prerequisites.
This course covers basic concepts of molecular and cellular biology by focusing on components of organisms from atoms to cells and the roles they play within the organism. This course can be taken as the second or third course in the required three-semester introductory biology sequence for majors and minors in the Biological Sciences Department.

BIOS 1610: Molecular and Cellular Biology Lab - HC

43390     T     8:00 - 10:50 a.m.     2415 WOOD     0 credit hours     Staff
43401     R     8:00 - 10:50 a.m.     2415 WOOD     0 credit hours     Staff

BUS 1750: Business Enterprise - HC (Hybrid)

42197     T     11:00 - 12:15 p.m.     1130 SCHDR     3 credit hours     Karen Lancendorfer
42200     R     9:30 - 10:45 a.m.      1355 SCHDR     3 credit hours     Gary Schauer

*Note: Students will download a 75 minute video lecture each week that covers business theory and practice. During class meetings students will discuss concepts presented in the video lecture, work on team projects, and take quizzes and tests.
*Note: This course satisfies General Education Area V: Social and Behavioral Sciences.
This course introduces students to the development and value of business institutions in society. Students will examine the dynamics of business decision-making and demonstrate the ability to identify, define, and interpret essential business concepts. The relationships among business activities will be studied to determine their interactions with the economic, political, legal, global, and social environments.

Three female honors college students making Ws with their fingers.

CHEM 1100: General Chemistry I - HC

42961     MWF  12:00 - 12:50 p.m.    1220 CHEM      3 credit hours       Donald Schreiber
44165     TR      11:00 - 12:15 p.m.    1260 CHEM      3 credit hours       Mo Yirong
40558     MWF   11:00 - 11:50 a.m.    1220 CHEM      3 credit hours       Donald Schreiber
*Students must register for both the lecture and lab sections of this course.
*Prerequisite: (MATH 1110 Minimum Grade of C or MATH 111 Minimum Grade of C or MATH 1180 Minimum Grade of C or MATH 118 Minimum Grade of C or MATH 2000 Minimum Grade of C or MATH 200 Minimum Grade of C or SAT Mathematics 560 or ACT Math 24 or Math Online Placement Exam 12) and (CHEM 1110 Minimum Grade of C with concurrency or CHEM 111 Minimum Grade of C with concurrency).
*Note: To count for General Education Area VI: Natural Science credit, both CHEM 1100 and CHEM 1110 must be passed.
*Note: This section does not meet our standard 25 student cap, but is significantly smaller than non-honors sections.
Chemistry is, by its nature, the central science.  In any area of activity that deals with the material world, there is inevitably a concern for the fundamental character of the materials involved with regard to their properties, their interactions with other materials, and the changes they undergo.  The course will study the basic nature of matter including the properties of the various states of matter and solutions.  We will also study atomic and electronic structure and the nature of chemical bonding.  The theory and fundamental principles of chemistry are emphasized in this foundation course which serves primarily those who intend to enroll for more than two semesters of chemistry. Students well prepared may earn credit by taking an examination.

CHEM 1110: General Chemistry I Lab - HC     Ekkehard Sinn

40745     W     8:00 - 10:50 a.m.   2831 CHEM      1 credit hour    
40725     F      8:00 - 10:50 a.m.    2831 CHEM     1 credit hour    
40739     F      8:00 - 10:50 a.m.    2271 CHEM     1 credit hour    
46370     W     8:00 - 10:50 a.m.    2902 WOOD    1 credit hour   
40727     T       2:00 - 4:50 p.m.     2831 CHEM     1 credit hour   
45045     F      8:00 - 10:50 a.m.     2851 CHEM     1 credit hour   
43932     T       2:00 - 4:30 p.m.      2831 CHEM     1 credit hour   
*Note: In addition to the cost of a three-credit class, there is a Chemistry Class Fee $75.00 Flat Fee.
*Note: This section does not meet our standard 25 student cap, but is significantly smaller than non-honors sections.
This is the companion laboratory course to CHEM 1100. This course is also intended for students who completed a general chemistry course without laboratory at another institution.

CHEM 1120: General Chemistry II - HC

44029     MWF     9:00 - 9:50 a.m.    1220 CHEM      3 credit hours     Donald Schreiber
*Prerequisites: CHEM 1100 and CHEM 1110 (with a minimum grade of “C” or better in all prerequisites); and CHEM 1130 with a minimum grade of “C” or better (may be taken concurrently).
*Note: This section does not meet our standard 25 student cap, but is significantly smaller than non-honors sections.
The properties of a number of the more representative elements and the compounds which they form are studied. Chemical relationships in the periodic table, electrochemistry, and the equilibrium principle are also treated.   

CHEM 1130: General Chemistry II Lab - HC

40747     T     8:00 - 10:50 a.m.     1831 CHEM     1 credit hour     Ekkehard Sinn
44168     F     2:00 - 4:50 p.m.       1871 CHEM     1 credit hour     Ekkehard Sinn
*Note: In addition to the cost of a three-credit class, there is a Chemistry Class Fee $75.00 Flat Fee
*Prerequisites: CHEM 1100 and CHEM 1110 (with a minimum grade of “C” or better in any prerequisites); and CHEM 1120 with a minimum grade of “C” or better (may be taken concurrently).
This is the companion laboratory course to CHEM 1120. This course is also intended for students who completed a general chemistry course without laboratory at another institution.

Cinderella Project volunteers holding up signs in front of a wall with paintings hung on it.COM 1040: Public Speaking - HC

42960     TR     2:00 - 3:15 p.m.    2018 BROWN     3 credit hours     Jasmine Labine
*Note: This course satisfies General Education Proficiency 4: Oral Communications.
Study of the application of principles of communication underlying effective oral presentations, with attention given to speaking in business, professional and public settings. Includes practice in preparing, presenting and evaluating speeches and other forms of oral presentations. This course may be offered in an accelerated format.

ECON 2010: Principles of Microeconomics - HC

44456     MWF  9:00 - 9:50 a.m.     1014 LHC     3 credit hours     William Kern
*Note: This course satisfies General Education Area V: Social and Behavioral Sciences.
An introduction to microeconomics, the study of the price system and resource allocation, problems of monopoly, and the role of government in regulating and supplementing the price system.

ECON 3800: International Economics - HC

45029     TR  9:30 - 10:45 a.m.     1014 LHC     3 credit hours    Michael Ryan
*Prerequisites: ECON 2010 and ECON 2020.
A study of the fundamentals of international trade and related problems, with special reference to the implications of the international economic policies of the United States both for the economy and for the firm.

EDMM 1420: Engineering Graphics - HC

43679     T     3:30 - 6:20 p.m.      C0219 FLOYD     Slobodan Urdarevik
Essentials of engineering graphics including technical sketching, CAD applications, applied geometry, orthographic projection, section, dimensioning, tolerancing, threads and fasteners, weldments, detail and assembly drawing, charting and basic elements of descriptive geometry. All work is according to current ANSI drafting standards. Previous technical drawing is recommended.

ENGL 1050: Thought and Writing - HC

42092     MW     10:00 - 11:40 a.m.    4010 BROWN     4 credit hours     Elisabeth Spinner    
42732     TR     
10:00 - 11:40 a.m.     3037 BROWN     4 credit hours     Adrienne Redding   
40695     MW     2:00 - 3:40 p.m.        4202 DUNBR     4 credit hours     Judith Buchanan   

*Prerequisite: Satisfactory ACT English score, or placement essay, or ENGL 1000.
* The following majors are restricted from taking this course: Pre-Business Administration (PRBA); Pre-Engineering (PREG); Pre-Aviation Flight Science (PRFL); Undecided: Pre-Business (UNBP).
*Note: This course satisfies General Education Proficiency 1: college-level writing course.

A writing course in which the students will work closely with the instructor to develop their sense of language as a means of shaping and ordering their experience and ideas, and to develop imagination, thought, organization, and clarity in their written work. This course does not count as credit towards English major or minor.  This course does fulfill the University Intellectual Skills college level writing requirement.

ENGL 1100: Literary Interpretation - HC

40707     TR     12:00 - 1:40 p.m.     4045 BROWN      4 credit hours      Todd Kuchta
*Prerequisites: Minimum Grade of B in ENGL 1050/105, BCM 1420/142, IME 1020/10, OR BIS 1420/142
*Note: This course satisfies General Education Area I: Fine Arts
An introduction to the study of literature, aimed at developing abilities to read literature and write about it with skill, sensitivity, and care. Students will read poetry, drama, and prose fiction, and through the writing of several papers will be introduced to terms and methods of formal study of literature. Course required for entry into most upper-level English courses.

Garbage on a beach in New York.

ENVS 3000: Introduction to Sustainability - HC

46484     TR     9:30 - 10:45 a.m.      1022 LHC       3 credit hours     Lynne Heasley
*Note: This course satisfies General Education Area VII: Natural Science and Technology: Applications and Implications.
This course examines the modern concept of sustainability; its historical roots, theories and debates, emerging principles and practices, and moral visions for the future. From household to global scales, students will analyze interrelated questions of ecological resilience, social justice, technological change, and alternative economic paradigms. Case studies will include core sustainability challenges such as energy, water, food systems, endangered species, land use, and population. The class will require community-based field experience during the semester.

 

ES 2800: Human Flourishing and the Pursuit of Happiness - HC

46519     M     2:00 - 4:30 p.m.     3140 SANGN     3 credit hours     Jeffrey Jones
*Note: This course satisfies General Education Area II: Humanities. May be repeated for credit.
This course is designed to address the enduring question “What is Human Flourishing?” Drawing from philosophy, literature and the social sciences, we introduce students to conceptions, visions, and conditions of human flourishing, its changing nature across many periods of Western history, its manifold expressions in contemporary life, and its pursuit in the local community. This course is also an invitation to explore one’s own biases about what it is to flourish and achieve (or at least pursue) happiness.

FIN 3200: Business Finance - HC

41200     TR     11:00 - 12:15 p.m.     1325 SCHDR     3 credit hours     Onur Arugaslan
Prerequisites: ACTY 2100 and (STAT 2160 or STAT 3660 or MATH 2160 or MATH 3660 or IME 2610), or equivalent.
Restrictions: Restricted to majors/minors across multiple departments. Please see advisor for specific program restrictions.
Presents a basis for understanding the financial management function of the business enterprise. Considers financial principles and techniques essential for planning and controlling profitability and liquidity of assets, planning capital structure and cost of capital, and utilizing financial instruments and institutions for capital raising.

GPS 1500: Intro to Graphic & Printing Sciences Lab - HC

44689     R     2:30 - 5:20 p.m.     C0220 Floyd     0 credit hours     Lois Lemon
Lecture CRN is 42588 (4 credit hours, must be taken with lab)
Note: This course satisfies General Education Area VI: Natural Science with Laboratory.
An introductory course describing the printing/imaging industry. Image Design, preparation, generation, photo imaging by photomechanical and desktop systems, proofing, presswork, and bindery. A comparison of all printing methods will be included. Learning environment enhance by hands-on experience.

HIST 3030: World History since 1500 - HC

45071     W     6:00 - 8:30 p.m.     3030 BROWN     3 credit hours     Randall Janes    
*Note: This course satisfies General Education Area IV: Other Cultures and Civilizations.
Introduction to World History since 1500, intended for students of all majors. By “world history” is meant not the sum history of the world’s separate societies and culture, but major chapters in the history of the interaction between them. We will examine the ways in which societies contacted one another, the ways they influenced one another, and the ways new societies emerged, including the roles played by migration, trade, war, empire, technology, epidemic, and religious and cultural diffusion.

HNRS 2500: Politics of Genocide

42404   M     6:00 - 8:20 p.m.        1024 LHC     3 credit hours     Thomas Kostrzewa
*Note: This course satisfies General Education Area V: Social and Behavioral Sciences.
While the use of the term genocide is relatively recent, the act of genocide is very old. The purpose of this course is to broaden the discussion of genocide beyond its usual association with World War II and the Jewish Holocaust and systematically examine the relationship between nationalism, political power, and the dehumanization of certain groups that has led to genocide in the past and sustains genocide in the present. Cases discussed in the course will include, but are not limited to, Armenia, Tibet, Rwanda, South Africa, The United States, Indonesia, Kurdistan, Congo, Cambodia, Ukraine, and the Balkans.

HNRS 3202: Modernism in Art & Literature

44219     MW    12:30 - 1:45 p.m.      1004 RCVA    3 credit hours      Jeffrey Abshear
*Note: This course satisfies General Education Area II: Humanities.
The early 20th century was a rich period of innovation in art and literature. Thanks to the efforts of artists and writers including Pablo Picasso, Marcel Duchamp, Ernest Hemingway, and D.H. Lawrence, our conception of art and culture was transformed. In this class we will read novels and short stories, and study paintings and sculptures, by these and other important figures of this revolutionary period. We will examine artistic movements including Cubism, Futurism, and Surrealism and discuss the ways in which the artists and writers interacted with one another and were affected by historical events. This is a class for students interested in art, who like to read, and want to discover more about the artistic developments of Modernism. A group of honors students in front of the Charles Wright Museum.

HNRS 3203: Utopian & Dystopian Fiction

44265      MW    10:00 – 11:40 a.m.      1022 LHC      4 credit hours       Becky Cooper
*Note: This course satisfies General Education Area II: Humanities.
At least since Thomas More’s celebrated work the idea of a utopia simultaneously conjures up two distinct meanings: first, as an imaginative idea of an idealized community in which humankind, having seemingly attained sufficient mastery or even perfection, seeks to create a rational, equitable, and just society offering genuine human fellowship and solidarity; and second, as an utter impossibility, as “no place,” for as the “good place,” the imaginative ideal seeking the common good, is yet to be realized, and perhaps is inherently unattainable, utopia is simultaneously “nowhere.” Over time, these twin meanings of utopia, meanings purposefully, ironically, and artistically joined in More’s book, separate into two distinct and immensely popular traditions: the utopian novel, culminating in 19th century works such as Edward Bellamy’s Looking Backward and carried forward into the next century by Charlotte Perkins Gilman’s Herland, and the dystopian novel, prefigured by Dostoevsky’s Notes from Underground and The Legend of the Grand Inquisitor(found in The Brothers Karamazov) and most famously expressed in novels by Zamyatin, Huxley, and Orwell. Whatever qualities of scientific invention, fantasy, and imagination are present in our readings, we find that the utopian imagination expresses very real and human desires that arise from a given author’s discontents with his or her historical circumstances. We will trace the development of utopian desire giving way to dystopian discontent through a chronological reading of our novels and selected films, taking pains to grasp each work within both its historical and literary context as well as its ongoing relevance to our contemporary lives. The course seeks to foster enhanced critical thinking, reading, and interpretive skills as well as to provide students with the opportunity to improve in the conception, writing, and revision of their critical essays.

HNRS 3301: Jazz, Blues, & the Harlem Renaissance   

44883     MW     1:00 - 2:40 p.m.     1022 LHC     4 credit hours     Von Washington Sr.
*Note: This course satisfies General Education Area III: United States: Culture and Issues.
“Jazz, Blues, and the Harlem Renaissance” seeks to reevaluate the cultural significance and meaning of the Jazz Age through the intensive study of the major literary and musical artists, critics, and philosophers embodied in the creative energies found within the “New Negro” movement. By placing special emphasis on the literary achievements of authors such as Langston Hughes, Jean Toomer, Nella Larsen, and Zora Neale Hurston, as well as the emergence and dissemination of jazz and blues between 1920-1950 (from Bessie Smith, Louis Armstrong, Billie Holiday, and Duke Ellington through Charlie Parker and Thelonious Monk) we discover a different yet crucial expression of the very experience and rhythm of modernity and a striking counterpoint to the “Waste Land” of T.S. Eliot. We will also focus on how the era sought to challenge America’s “strange fruit,” its fundamental perceptions and contradictions on race, class, and artistry embedded within its culture and identity from the era of slavery to the present in works that celebrate the nation’s intrinsic individualism, freedom, and multiculturalism.

HNRS 3701: Technology in the Arts

44476     TR     12:30 - 1:45 p.m.     1014 LHC     3 credit hours      Kevin Abbott
*Note: This course satisfies General Education Area VII: Natural Sciences and Technology: Applications and Implications.
*Note: Students are required to bring a laptop to class.

This class will explore the ongoing relationship between the fine arts and technology, with an emphasis on recent practices and emerging technologies. Students will learn how musicians, theatre artists, choreographers and visual artists have taken advantage of technology to meet their needs, and how technology has influenced and inspired them to explore new creative territory. Students will also learn how technology itself is often the subject of artistic work, and that the questions surrounding human interaction with technology have proven to be a provocative subject for artists. Students will see how media technology has empowered composers, choreographers, designers and directors to create entirely new experiences for live audiences, Students will learn about technologies which have impacted the fine arts in recent years including video projections, interactive sensors and systems, motion capture, MIDI, audio processing, 3D printing, and envision how emerging technologies might be used to support artistic endeavors in the near future.

HNRS 4101: Introduction to World Cinema        

43936     T     6:00 – 9:15 p.m.     1011 LHC     3 credit hours     Jason Conde
*Note: This course satisfies General Education Area I: Fine Arts
The course objective is to provide an overview of World Cinema and the interrelationships between National Cinemas. Though particular attention will be given to the Cinemas of Europe, students will also be introduced to Cinemas of Japan, China, India, Africa, Middle East, South America, and others. Each session will include a short introduction to the material and a screening of a film. General areas covered include the history of individual National Cinemas, the variety of different film movements, and the influence of these movements on American films. Coursework includes several small projects involving viewing films outside of class, a major final paper/presentation, and two exams.

HNRS 4980: How and Why to Write an Undergraduate Thesis   

44537        HYBRID            1 credit hour           Jared Randall
Meeting times: Aug 28. Sept 4, Sept 18. Oct 2. Oct 23, Nov 13 at 1 p.m. in room 1014 LHC

HNRS 4980: How and Why to Write an Undergraduate Thesis        

43986        online                1 credit hour          Beth Beaudin-Seiler
44197        online                1 credit hour          Beth Beaudin-Seiler
44198        online                1 credit hour          Beth Beaudin-Seiler
44347        online                1 credit hour          Jared Randall
This online course covers all aspects of preparing and completing an honors thesis. Included are modules on identifying a thesis topic, conducting a literature review, citing sources, finding a thesis committee, structuring the thesis, and defending the thesis.

An honors college graduate being corded by his friend.

HOL 2801: Health and Well Being – HC

42970     T     4:00 – 6:30 p.m.     1014 LHC     3 credit hours     Richard Szwaja   
*Note: This course satisfies General Education Area VIII: Health and Well-Being.
This course is designed to provide information on the multiple dimensions of health and well-being. This course is designed to promote greater awareness, understanding and ownership of the multiple dimensions of health and well-being. This course provides students with a holistic approach to understanding self and community through a health focus. Through dialog, experiential activities, service-learning and reflection, students explore theory and practice in the following areas: culture, research, and self-care; and well-being encompassing mental, emotional, physical, spiritual, environmental, social, and vocational health. As a Service Learning course it requires a minimum of 15 hours of service with a course-relevant community partner, which will count toward the Lee Honors College service requirement.

HSV 2250: Growth, Development, and Aging-HC                       

43561     TR     11:00 - 12:15 p.m.     4095 CHHS     3 credit hours     Cassie Lopez-Jeng
*Note: This course satisfies General Education Area V: Social and Behavioral Sciences.
This course explores the physical, mental, emotional, cognitive, and social patterns of growth, development, and aging. Special emphasis for the occupational therapy student will be prenatal development, survival and health during infancy, physical and cognitive development during childhood, middle childhood, adolescence, young adult, middle adult, and late adulthood. Included will be areas focused on search for adolescent identity, sexuality, and relationships with family, peers, and the adult society. Finally, the course will expose the student to some of the issues of old age that are relevant in today's society, including attitudes toward death and dying, assisted suicide, and euthanasia.

IEE 1020: Technical Communications-HC             

43680     TR    11:00 – 12:15 p.m.     2248 KOHRM    3 credit hours    Timothy Chapman    
43686     TR       3:30 – 4:45 p.m.     2250 KOHRM     3 credit hours    Laurel Palmer
43687     TR       9:30 – 10:45 a.m.     2303 KOHRM    3 credit hours   Thomas Swartz
43690     TR       4:00 - 5:15 p.m.       2258 KOHRM     3 credit hours    Kathleen Balke
*Note: This course satisfies General Education Proficiency I: College-Level Writing.
It is essential that engineering and technology students write effectively. Technical writing presents facts using language that even non-technical audiences can understand. In this class students choose topics related to their individual field of study/interest. Principles of objective presentation of factual material in written, oral, and electronic communication, with emphasis on the research process. Content, format, and mechanics, as well as a clear, concise style are important components of individual and collaborative assignments.

MATH 1220: Calculus I-HC                 

See Course Lookup
*Note: In addition to the cost of a three credit class, there is a Mathematics Class Fee $15.00 Flat Fee
*Prerequisite: MATH 1180 Min grade=C or ACT Math Test Score at least 27 or SAT Mathematics Test Score at least 610.
The first of a two-semester sequence in differential and integral calculus. Functions, limits, continuity, techniques and applications of differentiation, integration, trigonometric, logarithmic and exponential functions.

Three female students holding a Scrabble tropy.

MATH 1700: Calculus I Science & Engineering-HC            

See Course Lookup
*Prerequisites & Corequisites: Prerequisite: MATH 1180 or by placement into the course. Placement may be determined by completing at least 3 1/2 years of college preparatory mathematics, including trigonometry, by ACT/SAT scores and/or by a Department of Mathematics placement mechanism.
*Note: Students who take more than one of MATH 1220, 1700, or 2000 will receive only 4 hours of credit toward graduation. This course satisfies General Education Proficiency 4: Mathematics or Quantitative Reasoning.
The first of a two-semester sequence in differential and integral calculus which emphasizes applications and preparation for science and engineering (particularly physics). Vectors, functions, limits, continuity, techniques of differentiation, integration, and trigonometric, logarithmic and exponential functions.   A graphing calculator is required.  See the Mathematics Department web pages for the current list of required or recommended models.

MDVL 1450: Heroes and Villains of the Middle Ages-HC     Joshua Parks

41468     TR     9:30 – 10:45 a.m.     4202 DUNBR     3 credit hours
*Note: Students may not receive credit for both MDVL 1450 and HIST 1450. This course satisfies General Education Area II: Humanities.
An interdisciplinary course designed to introduce beginning students to the medieval roots of the individual, social, and institutional ideals and values of modern Western culture as they are expressed and exemplified in the images of medieval heroes and their counterparts.

MGMT 2500: Organizational Behavior-HC

41938     MW     9:30 - 10:45 a.m.    2345 SCHDR     3 credit hours     Paula Eckert
* Prerequisite: BUS 1750
* Restrictions: This course is restricted to majors/minors across multiple departments. Please see advisor for specific program restrictions.
* Restricted to majors/minors across multiple departments. Please see advisor for specific program restrictions.
This course provides an examination of individual, interpersonal, group, and organization processes faced by employees. Current theory, research, and practice regarding variables that influence human behavior are discussed. Emphasis is placed on learning relevant to goal setting, managing change, team processes, reward structures, human productivity, and career management in organization settings.

MKTG 2500: Marketing Principles-HC          

40730     TR    2:00 - 3:15 p.m.     1125 SCHDR     3 credit hours     Greg Gerfen
*The following classes are restricted from taking this course: Freshman
*Restriction: This course is restricted to certain majors. Please see the course listing online for a complete list.           
Introduction to the role of marketing in the U.S. and global economy. Emphasis on how organizations create customer value through marketing strategy planning. Topics include buyer behavior, market segmentation, product planning, service quality, promotion, pricing, and managing channel relationships.

PSCI 2000: National Government-HC

43003     MW     3:30 – 4:45 p.m.     2212 DUNBR     3 credit hours     Karl Hokenmaier
*Note: This course satisfies General Education Area III: The United States: Cultures and Issues.
An introductory survey of American national government. This course introduces the basic principles and theories of American government, explores the political process, describes the structure, and illustrates its functions. Consideration is given to the relationships of government to the ethnic, religious, and cultural diversity of the American society.

A group of student volunteers standing in front of Gibbs house holding vegetables harvested from the garden.

PSY 1000: General Psychology-HC

40362    TR    12:30 – 1:45 p.m.     1215 WOOD        3 credit hours     Douglas Johnson
This course is a general introduction to the study of behavior. The reading materials and coursework provide a framework for answering the question: “Why do humans (and other animals) behave as they do?” The course consists of approximately 30 units of study covering the approach to, finding of, and research methods of the science known as behavior analysis. Throughout these units students will develop an understanding of behavior by applying the concepts and principles covered in the course materials to a variety of situations in the lives of themselves and people in general. Students will participate in class discussion, complete relevant conceptual worksheets, and take regular/daily unit exams.

PSY 1400: Introduction to Behavior Analysis-HC     Kelly Kohler      

42665        TR     10:00 - 11:40 a.m.     2204 DUNBR     4 credit hours 
42671        MW    4:00 – 5:40 p.m.       2209 DUNBR      4 credit hours 
Provides the foundation for many of the other courses in the Psychology major, by introducing students to the principles of conditioning and learning, and behavior analysis concepts that can be applied to clinical, counseling, school, experimental, child, sports, community, and industrial psychology, as well as autism, psychoses, anorexia, phobia, ethics, religion, gender, procrastination, sexual behavior, drug use, speech pathology, developmental disabilities, social work, special education, behavioral medicine, animal training, juvenile corrections, and everyday life.

SPPA 2000: Communication Disorders and Sciences - HC

46383     TR     4:00 - 5:15 p.m.     1087 CHHS     3 credit hours     Heidi Vogley
This introductory course provides a broad overview of the acoustical, anatomical, biological, emotional, linguistic, physiological, and psychosocial bases of human communication and the ways in which it may be disordered. The impact of scientific investigation, technology, education, economics, health and rehabilitation on communication disorders will be addressed. Individual and societal variables related to communication and its disorders, the challenges of medical and technological advancements, and the quantitative tools used in assessment and rehabilitation will be stressed.

A group of honors students on a boat in front of the Statue of Liberty. STAT 2160: Business Statistics-HC

41369     MWF     9:00 - 9:50 a.m.     3309 ROOD     3 credit hours      Nichole Andrews
*Prerequisite: MATH 1160 or MATH 1180 or MATH 1220 or MATH 1230 or MATH 2000; with a grade of “C” or better.
*Note: This course satisfies General Education Proficiency 4: Mathematics or Quantitative Reasoning.
An applications-oriented study of statistical concepts and techniques. The course focuses on the student as a user of statistics who needs a minimal understanding of mathematical theory and formula derivation. Major topics of study are statistical description, central tendency, dispersion, distributional shapes, sampling, confidence levels, probability, comparison tests, association tests, and regression analysis. The objectives of the course are to develop the skill to apply these concepts in conjunction with computer usage and make appropriate decisions regarding actual business problems. All STAT 2160 students are expected to take the final exam on the assigned mass exam day.

Experiential Credits

ED 4700: Intern Teaching: Early Childhood                                      

Various     Varies     5 credit hours     Staff
*Note: In addition to the cost of a five credit class, there is a Student Liability-Education $5.00 Flat Fee
*Restriction: This course is restricted to the following major(s): Early Childhood Prof Educ (ECEJ); Early Childhood Education (ECEM); Early Childhood (ECEN); Early Childhood & Elem Educ (EEEN)
Only for seniors who have been admitted to teacher education. This internship is required a semester or session prior to the full semester internship. This experience consists of five half-days per week in a fall or spring semester or five full days per week in a summer session in a pre-kindergarten program. Students will synthesize the knowledge, apply the understandings, and practice the skills which they acquired during University course work. They will participate in all phases of the school program where they are assigned. To be undertaken concurrently with ED 4090.

ED 4710: Intern Teaching: Elem/Mid School

Various     Varies     4 credit hours     Staff
*Note: In addition to the cost of a four credit class, there is a Student Liability-Education $5.00 Flat Fee
*Restriction: This course is restricted to certain majors. Please see the course listing online for a complete list.
*Prerequisites: All other courses and program requirements must be completed prior to Intern Teaching.
*Note: All sections count for honors college credit.
This course is only for seniors who have been admitted to teacher education and have completed all of their professional studies courses. This will be the final field experience consisting of five days per week in an educational setting. Students will synthesize the knowledge, apply the understandings, and practice the skills which they acquired during their University course work. They will participate in all phases of the school program where they are assigned. To be taken concurrently with ED 4100. Prerequisites: All other courses and program requirements must be completed prior to Intern Teaching.Students having lunch with an alumnus while on the Disney Study in the States trip.

ED 4750: Intern Teaching: Mid/Sec School

Various     Varies     5 credit hours     Staff
*Note: In addition to the cost of a five credit class, there is a Student Liability-Education $5.00 Flat Fee
*Restriction: This course is restricted to certain majors. Please see the course listing online for a complete list.
*Note: All sections count for honors college credit.
Students devote a minimum of five days per week for one semester to intern teaching. They are expected to have experience in both the curricular and extra-curricular programs of the school in which they teach.

ENGR 2980: Cooperative Education

Arranged     3 credit hours
*The following classes are restricted from taking this course: Freshman.
A parallel cooperative education program or internship; involves part-time planned and supervised work experience related to a student's major during a semester. A written report of the student's work activities will be required.

ENGR 2990: Cooperative Education

Arranged     3 credit hours
*The following classes are restricted from taking this course: Freshman, Sophomore.
A parallel cooperative education program or internship; involves part-time planned and supervised work experience related to a student's major during a semester. A written report of the student's work activities will be required.

ENGR 3980: Cooperative Education

Arranged     3 credit hours
*The following classes are restricted from taking this course: Freshman, Sophomore.
A parallel cooperative education program or internship; involves part-time planned and supervised work experience related to a student's major during a semester. A written report of the student's work activities will be required.

ENGR 3990: Cooperative Education

Arranged     3 credit hours
*The following classes are restricted from taking this course: Freshman, Sophomore.
A parallel cooperative education program or internship; involves part-time planned and supervised work experience related to a student's major during a semester. A written report of the student's work activities will be required.

HNRS 3990: Field Experience Practicum

Various     Varies     Variable credit hours           
**For course registration, complete the Agreement Form.

Students standing in front of the Golden Gate Bridge on the Disney Study in the States trip. HNRS 4950: Individual Study

Variable credit hours
**For course registration, complete the Agreement Form.

HNRS 4990: Honors College Thesis

Variable credit hours
**For course registration, complete the Registration Form.

Other Ways to Earn Honors Credit

In addition to the courses listed above, there are many other ways to earn honors credit. Please see below for options according to whether you have a course requirement (joined the honors college prior to the 2014-15 academic year) or credit hour requirement (joined honors college fall 2014 or after). If you are unsure about your specific requirements, please refer to your original requirements letter.

Course Requirement - The following options may count for ONE (1) honors course

  • One field experience or independent study. Visit the the website for more information.
  • Two semesters of a foreign language or American Sign Language. Courses must be taken at WMU after you become a member of the honors college.
  • Two semesters of a music ensemble, dance performance or theatre practicum resulting in academic credit on your transcript.
  • Any study abroad experience that results in academic credit on your transcript.

Credit hour requirement - Up to half of your honors course credit requirement may be satisfied with the options listed below. Students receive experiential honors credits via an approved internship/field experience or independent study for honors credits. Please note that to receive credit for internship/field experience or independent study, the appropriate approval form must be submitted PRIOR to initiation of the experience. It is possible to receive honors credit for more than one field experience or independent study with prior approval by the honors college dean or associate dean. Approval will only be granted if the experiences are substantially different.

  • Independent study, field experience, co-op, internships and clinicals that result in academic credit on your transcript.
  • Four honors credits will be given for two semesters of the same foreign language. May be repeated for additional honors credit for additional foreign language(s). However, no additional honors credit will be given if a student takes more than two semesters of the same language.
  • Honors credit may be awarded for approved non-honors experiential courses in dance, music or theater as well as for participation in a varsity sports course. Up to three credits may be counted toward honors credit hour requirements and these may be accrued by repeating a course, or by taking multiple approved courses. Please see an honors college advisor for details.
  • Study abroad credits appearing on a student's WMU transcript, whether for a WMU course or a course run through another institution, will be counted as honors credit, up to a limit of 3 credits per semester. Multiple study abroad experiences may count for additional honors credit with honors college advisor, associate dean or dean approval.