Spring 2021 Honors College Course Catalog

IMPORTANT INFORMATION:

Nov. 5, 2020: Priority registration.

Jan. 11, 2021: Classes begin.

Jan. 15, 2021: Last day to drop or add classes.

Please note that the honors college dean does not receive course evaluation scores for any course that does not have the HNRS prefix and does not receive narrative comments for any course through the university's course evaluation system. We welcome and encourage your feedback on honors courses. All comments should be directed via email to Anthony Helms.

A group of honors college students crouched around Walt Disney's star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame.

COURSE OFFERINGS:

AAAS 2000: Intro to African American and African Studies - HC

15696     Asynchronous Online     3 credit hours     Fredah Mainah
*Note: This course satisfies WMU Essential Studies Level 1: Foundations – Inquiry and Engagement: Critical Thinking in the Arts and Humanities Category.

This course provides an overview of the culture, history and lived experiences of people of African ancestry, particularly in the U.S. and the Caribbean. This includes the philosophical underpinnings and the evolution of the discipline of African American Studies, methods of research and exploration, and its theoretical and practical applications. Historically oriented, this course involves both interpretation and chronology as it addresses African civilizations in the Western hemisphere, including the U.S. Moreover, this course explores topics such as folklore, mythology, languages, customs and traditions of people of African descent, as well as the rise and role of Black Nationalism and Black consciousness and their contemporary manifestations. 

ACTY 2100: Principles of Accounting I-HC

13786     HYBRID/See schedule for specific meeting dates and times     3 credit hours     Caroline Burke Kolehmainen
*Note: This course satisfies WMU Essential Studies Level 1: Foundations – Quantitative Literacy Category.
This is an introductory course in accounting, which includes an examination of the recording and reporting of business transactions, and the measurement of business income, assets, liabilities and equities. Emphasis is placed on financial reporting for decision-makers outside the organization.

ANTH 1500: Race, Biology, and Culture - HC

15744     HYBRID/See schedule for specific meeting dates and times     3 credit hours     Michelle Hrivnyak
*Note: This course satisfies General Education Area VII: Natural Science and Technology: Applications and Implications.
This course is an introduction to the anthropological study of human biological variation in modern populations. We will examine from a biocultural perspective how human populations adapt to life in difficult environments (e.g., tropics, high altitude, arctic) and in so doing, we will explore the biological and social meanings of human racial variation.

BIOS 1620: Ecology and Evolution Lab - HC

12896     Fully Synchronous Online T 9:00 - 11:50 a.m.     0 credit hours     Joanna Sblendorio
12899     Fully Synchronous Online W 2:00 - 4:50 p.m.     0 credit hours     Nicolette Sexton

BUS 1750: Business Enterprise - HC 

11720     Asynchronous Online     3 credit hours     Karen Lancendorfer
Students will download a 75 minute video lecture each week that covers business theory and practice.
*Note: This course satisfies General Education Area V: Social and Behavioral Sciences. 
This course introduces students to the development and value of business institutions in society. Students will examine the dynamics of business decision-making and demonstrate the ability to identify, define, and interpret essential business concepts. The relationships among business activities will be studied to determine their interactions with the economic, political, legal, global, and social environments.

Three female honors college students making Ws with their fingers. BUS 2200: Intro to Global Business - HC

12939     Partially Synchronous Online/See schedule for specific meeting dates and times     3 credit hours     Gerardo Rincon
*Prerequisite: Sophomore standing. 
An introduction to global business and its complex environment. Develop an understanding of relevant differences in the economic, sociopolitical, legal and ethical environment of global business. Realize how such differences can influence business functional operations such as production, marketing, management, information management, accounting and finance.

CHEM 1120: General Chemistry II - HC 

10049     Asynchronous Online     3 credit hours     Gellert Mezei
*Prerequisites: CHEM 1100 and CHEM 1110 (with a minimum grade of “C” or better in all prerequisites); and CHEM 1130 with a minimum grade of “C” or better (may be taken concurrently).
*Note: This section does not meet our standard 25 student cap, but is significantly smaller than non-honors sections.
The properties of a number of the more representative elements and the compounds which they form are studied. Chemical relationships in the periodic table, electrochemistry, and the equilibrium principle are also treated.

CHEM 1130: General Chemistry II Lab - HC

10738     Asynchronous Online     1 credit hour     Ramakrishna Guda
11519     Asynchronous Online     1 credit hour     Ramakrishna GudaCinderella Project volunteers holding up signs in front of a wall with paintings hung on it.

ECON 2020: Principles of Macroeconomics - HC

13887     Fully Synchronous Online/See schedule for specific meeting dates and times     3 credit hours    Eskander Alvi
*Note: This course satisfies General Education Area V: Social and Behavioral Sciences.
*Note: This course satisfies WMU Essential Studies Level 1: Foundations - Quantitative Literacy Category.
*Note: For students who plan to take both ECON 2010 and ECON 2020, it is preferable to take ECON 2010 before taking ECON 2020.
An introduction to macroeconomics, the study of total output and employment, inflation, economic growth, and introduction to international trade and development.

ENGL 1050: Foundations of Written Communication - HC

15979     Fully Synchronous Online/See schedule for specific meeting dates and times     3 credit hours     Adrienne Redding
*Prerequisite: Satisfactory ACT English score, or placement essay, or ENGL 1000.
* The following majors are restricted from taking this course: Pre-Business Administration (PRBA); Pre-Engineering (PREG); Pre-Aviation Flight Science (PRFL); Undecided: Pre-Business (UNBP).
*Note: This course satisfies General Education Proficiency 1: college-level writing course.
*Note: This course satisfies WMU Essential Studies Level 1: Foundations – Writing Category.
A writing course in which the students will work closely with the instructor to develop their sense of language as a means of shaping and ordering their experience and ideas, and to develop imagination, thought, organization, and clarity in their written work. This course does not count as credit towards English major or minor.  This course does fulfill the University Intellectual Skills college level writing requirement.

ES 2800: Human Flourishing and the Pursuit of Happiness - HC

15054     Asynchronous Online     3 credit hours     Jeffrey Jones
*Note: This course satisfies General Education Area II: Humanities.
*Note: This course satisfies WMU Essential Studies Level 1: Foundations – Inquiry and Engagement: Critical Thinking in the Arts and Humanities Category.
May be repeated for credit.
This course is designed to address the enduring question “What is Human Flourishing?” Drawing from philosophy, literature and the social sciences, we introduce students to conceptions, visions, and conditions of human flourishing, its changing nature across many periods of Western history, its manifold expressions in contemporary life, and its pursuit in the local community. This course is also an invitation to explore one’s own biases about what it is to flourish and achieve (or at least pursue) happiness.

GIST 2000: Introduction to Global and International Studies - HC

13570    In Person     TR     2:00 - 3:15 p.m.     1301 WOOD     3 credit hours     Thomas Kostrzewa
*Note: This course satisfies General Education Area IV: Other Cultures and Civilizations.
*Note: This course satisfies WMU Essential Studies Level 2: Exploration and Discovery – World Language and Culture Category.

Interdisciplinary introduction to global and international studies as an academic field of inquiry, with emphasis on historical development of the global system, global economy and society, environmental conditions and awareness, mass communications, technology and enterprise, response formats for global issues and intellectual and creative life. Explores the relationships between globalizing forces and the countervailing influences of regional and cultural identity.

GWS 2000: Intro to Gender and Women's Studies - HC

15626     Partially Synchronous Online/See schedule for specific meeting dates and times     4 credit hours     Angela Perez-Villa
*Note: This course satisfies General Education Area III: The United States: Cultures and Issues.
*Note: This course satisfies WMU Essential Studies Level 2: Exploration and Discovery – Societies and Cultures Category.

This interdisciplinary core course provides analytical frameworks for the study of gender and gender-defining institutions, exploring the social conditions associated with gender in the U.S. society in a global context. Course emphasizes approaches that study the diversity and similarity of gendered experience across class, racial and ethnic groups.

HIST 2020: World History to 1500 - HC

15471    Asynchronous Online     3 credit hours     Bryan Machin
*Note: This course satisfies General Education Area IV: Other Cultures and Civilizations.
*Note: This course satisfies WMU Essential Studies Level 2: Exploration and Discovery – World Language and Culture Category. 

With the growing integration of different geographical areas into an interconnected economic system, the world we inhabit today is increasingly becoming a global village. To become a competent member of the world community requires a sufficient knowledge of not only its present but also of its past. This course will provide an opportunity to learn about the past of the world, with a geographical coverage that literally extends to the entire globe, and in a span of time that began with the prehistoric age and ended in the 1500s. The focus of the course is on the political, socioeconomic, and cultural experiences of humanity. 

HNRS 2900: Walt's Pilgrimage 2021

16201     Fully Synchronous Online - 7 meeting times     1 credit hour     Christopher Tremblay
Meeting online: Wednesdays - Jan. 13 6:00-8:00pm; Jan. 27 6:00-7:45pm; Feb. 10 6:00-7:45pm; Feb. 24 6:00-7:45pm; March 24 6:00-7:45pm; April 7 6:00-7:45pm; April 21 6:00-7:45pm
This one-credit hour virtual course will follow the life of the famous Walt Disney from birth to death. Disney historians who are preserving Walt’s life story will be featured as guest speakers throughout the semester. This course offers a unique perspective on Walt Disney, including highlights of the places where he lived, worked, and played. This is a chance to walk in Walt’s footsteps and experience his entire life.

A group of honors students in front of the Charles Wright Museum.

HNRS 3202: Modernism in Art & Literature

15698    Fully Synchronous Online/MW     2:00 - 3:15 p.m.    3 credit hours      Jeffrey Abshear
*Note: This course satisfies General Education Area II: Humanities.
*Note: This course satisfies WMU Essential Studies Level 2: Exploration and Discovery – Artistic Theory and Practice Category.
The early 20th century was a rich period of innovation in art and literature. Thanks to the efforts of artists and writers including Pablo Picasso, Marcel Duchamp, Ernest Hemingway, and D.H. Lawrence, our conception of art and culture was transformed. In this class we will read novels and short stories, and study paintings and sculptures, by these and other important figures of this revolutionary period. We will examine artistic movements including Cubism, Futurism, and Surrealism and discuss the ways in which the artists and writers interacted with one another and were affected by historical events. This is a class for students interested in art, who like to read, and want to discover more about the artistic developments of Modernism.HNRS 3204: Postmodern Dystopias

HNRS 3204: Postmodern Dystopias

13530     Fully Synchronous Online/TR     12:00 - 1:15 p.m.      3 credit hours       Becky Cooper
*Note: This course satisfies General Education Area II: Humanities. 
*Note: This course satisfies WMU Essential Studies Level 2: Exploration and Discovery – Societies and Cultures Category.
Although few would question that our contemporary world should be termed “postmodern,” among scholars, there is no consensus on the precise meaning of the term. Two crucial historical events arising from World War II, the birth of computers and the atom bomb, signal a precipitous break from the modern, and have radically transformed all facets of contemporary political, social and personal life. Yet while our global world and engagement has been generally embraced and integrated within our contemporary existence, often celebrating the “singularity” of technology and everyday life in an age of “spiritual machines” when “computers exceed human intelligence” as Ray Kurzweil puts it, a decidedly dystopic imagination dominates the arts of films and literature. This course, through the exploration of fiction from the past half century, aims to explore the meaning, significance and implications of postmodern life and culture. Students will develop a critical awareness of postmodernity through lectures, class discussion, and student presentations on authors such as Jameson, Lyotard, Baudrillard, and others. Students will write short response essays and a creative response, give a presentation, and write a final formal essay. Time permitting, we will explore two films through a postmodern lens.

HNRS 3302: Civil Rights and Jazz 1970-75

13567     In Person     MW     10:00 - 11:15 a.m.     1320 SANGN    3 credit hours     Elizabeth Cowan
*Note: This course satisfies General Education Area III: United States: Culture and Issues.
*Note: This course satisfies WMU Essential Studies Level 2: Exploration and Discovery – Artistic Theory and Practice Category.

This course places special emphasis on American jazz form as a crucial influence and metaphor for the very rhythm and experience of modernity as it explores the interrelations between literature, music, and American culture through the music of Louis Armstrong, Fats Waller, and Duke Ellington among others.

HNRS 3303: The Vietnam War in Rock and Soul

14236     HYBRID/R     10:00 - 11:15 a.m.     1220 CHEM     3 credit hours     Steve Feffer
*Note: This course satisfies General Education Area III: United States: Culture and Issues.
*Note: This course satisfies WMU Essential Studies Level 2: Exploration and Discovery – Artistic Theory and Practice Category.

This course explores the history, meaning, and impact of the 1960s through two crucial cultural events: the Vietnam War and Rock music. The course aims to explore both the history of the war as well as the cultural debates and changes that continue to resonate today.

HNRS 3701: Technology in the Arts

13650     In Person     MW     12:30 - 1:45 p.m.     1028 Brown     3 credit hours      Kevin Abbott
*Note: This course satisfies General Education Area VII: Natural Sciences and Technology: Applications and Implications.
*Note: This course satisfies WMU Essential Studies Level 2: Exploration and Discovery – Science and Technology Category.
*Note: Students are required to bring a laptop to class. 

This class will explore the ongoing relationship between the fine arts and technology, with an emphasis on recent practices and emerging technologies. Students will learn how musicians, theatre artists, choreographers and visual artists have taken advantage of technology to meet their needs, and how technology has influenced and inspired them to explore new creative territory. Students will also learn how technology itself is often the subject of artistic work, and that the questions surrounding human interaction with technology have proven to be a provocative subject for artists. Students will see how media technology has empowered composers, choreographers, designers and directors to create entirely new experiences for live audiences, Students will learn about technologies which have impacted the fine arts in recent years including video projections, interactive sensors and systems, motion capture, MIDI, audio processing, 3D printing, and envision how emerging technologies might be used to support artistic endeavors in the near future.

HNRS 4102: Studies in Film: Film Adaptations         

13278     Partially Synchronous Online - T 6:00 - 7:30 p.m. plus ~1.5 hours required film viewing weekly     3 credit hours     Jason Conde     
*Note: This course satisfies General Education Area I: Fine Arts
*Note:
This course satisfies WMU Essential Studies Level 3: Connections – Global Perspectives Category.
The majority of films made in Hollywood are adaptations of other material. This course will study film adaptations in many forms: remakes, novels, short stories, theatrical plays, graphic novels, etc. Class will study the source material and then the adapted film paying special attention to the artistic form of each distinct medium and the choices artists make in adapting a work to the cinematic medium. Class work will include reading journals, tests, and a major paper.

HNRS 4980: How and Why to Write an Undergraduate Thesis        

13280        online               1 credit hour     Beth Beaudin-Seiler          
13321        online               1 credit hour     Beth Beaudin-Seiler        
13346        online               1 credit hour     Jared Randall       
13660        online               1 credit hour     Jared Randall       
This online course covers all aspects of preparing and completing an honors thesis. Included are modules on identifying a thesis topic, conducting a literature review, citing sources, finding a thesis committee, structuring the thesis, and defending the thesis.

An honors college graduate being corded by his friend.

HOL 2801: Health and Well Being – HC

12401     Fully Synchronous Online/T     4:00 – 6:30 p.m.    3 credit hours     Amy Geib
*Note: This course satisfies General Education Area VIII: Health and Well-Being.
*Note: This course satisfies WMU Essential Studies Level 2: Exploration and Discovery – Personal Wellness Category.
This course is designed to provide information on the multiple dimensions of health and well-being. This course provides students with a holistic approach to understanding self and community through a health focus. This course is designed around three central themes: self-care, community, and culture. Students will engage in a variety of activities which will foster critical thinking skills and personal exploration. Students exposed to theory and practice in the following areas: self-care and well-being, culture, research, and health broadly defined and encompassing psychological, physical, spiritual, environmental, social health.

MATH 1230: Calculus II-HC                 

See Course Lookup
*Note: In addition to the cost of a three credit class, there is a Mathematics Class Fee $15.00 Flat Fee
*Note: A graphing calculator is required.
*Prerequisite: MATH 1220 (recommended) or MATH 1700.
A continuation of Calculus I. Techniques and applications of integration, trigonometric functions, sequences and series, indeterminate forms, improper integrals, applications to elementary differential equations.

Three female students holding a Scrabble tropy.MATH 1710: Calculus II Science & Engineering-HC            

See Course Lookup
*Prerequisite: MATH 1700 (recommended) or (MATH 1220 and departmental approval).
*Note: Students who take more than one of MATH 1220, 1700, or 2000 will receive only 4 hours of credit toward graduation. This course satisfies General Education Proficiency 4: Mathematics or Quantitative Reasoning.
A continuation of MATH 1700, with further applications and preparation for science and engineering. Techniques of integration, more on trigonometric functions, sequences and series, indeterminate forms, improper integrals, and more on elementary differential equations.

MGMT 2500: Organizational Behavior-HC

16385     Fully Synchronous Online/MW 9:30 - 10:45 a.m.     3 credit hours     Paula Eckert
* Prerequisite: BUS 1750
* Restrictions: This course is restricted to majors/minors across multiple departments. Please see advisor for specific program restrictions.
* Restricted to majors/minors across multiple departments. Please see advisor for specific program restrictions.
This course provides an examination of individual, interpersonal, group, and organization processes faced by employees. Current theory, research, and practice regarding variables that influence human behavior are discussed. Emphasis is placed on learning relevant to goal setting, managing change, team processes, reward structures, human productivity, and career management in organization settings.

PHIL 2000: Intro to Philosophy-HC

14049     Fully Synchronous Online/TR 4:00 - 5:40 p.m.     4 credit hours     Anna Kietzerow
*Note: This course satisfies General Education Area II: Humanities.
*Note: This course satisfies WMU Essential Studies Level 1: Foundations – Inquiry and Engagement: Critical Thinking in the Arts and Humanities Category.

An introduction to the nature of philosophy by a consideration of major types of philosophical questions, such as the principles of rational belief, the existence of God, what is the good life, the nature of knowledge, the problem of truth and verification. Selected texts from representative philosophers are used to define the questions and to present typical answers.

PHIL 3140: Seeing Things Differently-HC

15800     Partially Synchronous Online/W 12:00 - 1:15 p.m. + two Mondays, check syllabus    3 credit hours     Jennifer Townsend
*Note: This course satisfies General Education Area II: Humanities.
*Note: This course satisfies WMU Essential Studies Level 2: Exploration and Discovery – Societies and Cultures Category.

Does the world seem more divided than ever? Have you ever wondered what it is that divides us? This course proposes to prepare students to go forth with a willingness to hear and understand where others are coming from, while also gaining a better understanding of their own views, all toward the goal of helping to bridge the cultural and political divide. We don’t have to agree with each other, but we do need to understand each other. “Beliefs matter because people act on their beliefs – whether those beliefs are true or not …” (Boghossian & Lindsay, 2019). By the end of this course, students will be on their way to becoming leaders in uniting us all. 

A group of student volunteers standing in front of Gibbs house holding vegetables harvested from the garden.

PSCI 2500: International Relations-HC

16109     Asynchronous Online     4 credit hours     Yuan-Kang Wang
*Note: This course satisfies General Education Area V: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

*Note: This course satisfies WMU Essential Studies Level 1: Foundations – Inquiry and Engagement: Critical Thinking in the Arts and Humanities Category.
A study of the nature of the international community and the forces which produce cooperation and conflict. Particular attention is given to analyzing power in terms of its acquisition and uses.

PSY 1000: General Psychology-HC

14464     Partially Synchronous Online/See schedule for specific meeting dates and times        3 credit hours     Anita Li
*Note: This course satisfies General Education Area V: Social and Behavioral Sciences. 
*Note: This course satisfies WMU Essential Studies Level 2: Exploration and Discovery – Science and Technology Category.
This course is a general introduction to the study of behavior. The reading materials and coursework provide a framework for answering the question: “Why do humans (and other animals) behave as they do?” The course consists of approximately 30 units of study covering the approach to, finding of, and research methods of the science known as behavior analysis. Throughout these units students will develop an understanding of behavior by applying the concepts and principles covered in the course materials to a variety of situations in the lives of themselves and people in general. Students will participate in class discussion, complete relevant conceptual worksheets, and take regular/daily unit exams.

PSY 1400: Introduction to Behavior Analysis-HC       

12129        Fully Synchronous Online TR 10:00 - 11:40 a.m.     4 credit hours     Sacha Pence
Provides the foundation for many of the other courses in the Psychology major, by introducing students to the principles of conditioning and learning, and behavior analysis concepts that can be applied to clinical, counseling, school, experimental, child, sports, community, and industrial psychology, as well as autism, psychoses, anorexia, phobia, ethics, religion, gender, procrastination, sexual behavior, drug use, speech pathology, developmental disabilities, social work, special education, behavioral medicine, animal training, juvenile corrections, and everyday life.

PSY 1600: Child Psychology-HC

14350    In Person     TR     12:30 – 1:45 p.m.     2120 SANGRN     3 credit hours     Scott Gaynor
*Prerequisite: PSY 1000 with a grade of “C” or better. 
An introduction to behavior principles in the analysis of complex behavior with an emphasis upon early childhood learning and the techniques for enhancing children’s development. Topics include mental retardation, behavioral problems in childhood, emotional development and language learning.

A group of honors students on a boat in front of the Statue of Liberty. STAT 2160: Business Statistics-HC

10707     Asynchronous Online     3 credit hours     Nichole Andrews    
*Prerequisite: MATH 1160 or MATH 1180 or MATH 1220 or MATH 1230 or MATH 2000; with a grade of “C” or better.
*Note: This course satisfies General Education Proficiency 4: Mathematics or Quantitative Reasoning.
An applications-oriented study of statistical concepts and techniques. The course focuses on the student as a user of statistics who needs a minimal understanding of mathematical theory and formula derivation. Major topics of study are statistical description, central tendency, dispersion, distributional shapes, sampling, confidence levels, probability, comparison tests, association tests, and regression analysis. The objectives of the course are to develop the skill to apply these concepts in conjunction with computer usage and make appropriate decisions regarding actual business problems. All STAT 2160 students are expected to take the final exam on the assigned mass exam day.

STAT 3660: Data Analysis for Biosciences-HC

12740     Asynchronous Online     4 credit hours     Carrie McKean  
*Note: This course satisfies General Education Proficiency 3: College-Level Mathematics or Quantitative Reasoning.
*Prerequisite: MATH 1100 or MATH 1110 with a grade of “C” or better; or the equivalent or satisfactory score on the departmental placement exam.
An introduction to statistics for students in the biological and related sciences with an emphasis on the basic concepts and explanations of why things work. The focus is on quantitative reasoning and statistical thinking for making decisions and conjectures. This numerical art will be illustrated with a wide range of interesting problems. Topics include descriptive statistics like means, medians, standard deviation, percentiles; correlation and regression - interpretation and prediction problems; the normal and binomial distributions; law of averages; sampling variability and standard errors; inferential statistics to -confidence intervals and tests of hypotheses for one- and two-sample problems.

EXPERIENTIAL CREDITS

ED 4700: Intern Teaching: Early Childhood                                      

Various     Varies     5 credit hours     Staff
*Note: In addition to the cost of a five credit class, there is a Student Liability-Education $5.00 Flat Fee
*Restriction: This course is restricted to the following major(s): Early Childhood Prof Educ (ECEJ); Early Childhood Education (ECEM); Early Childhood (ECEN); Early Childhood & Elem Educ (EEEN)
Only for seniors who have been admitted to teacher education. This internship is required a semester or session prior to the full semester internship. This experience consists of five half-days per week in a fall or spring semester or five full days per week in a summer session in a pre-kindergarten program. Students will synthesize the knowledge, apply the understandings, and practice the skills which they acquired during University course work. They will participate in all phases of the school program where they are assigned. To be undertaken concurrently with ED 4090.

ED 4710: Intern Teaching: Elem/Mid School

Various     Varies     4 credit hours     Staff
*Note: In addition to the cost of a four credit class, there is a Student Liability-Education $5.00 Flat Fee
*Restriction: This course is restricted to certain majors. Please see the course listing online for a complete list.
*Prerequisites: All other courses and program requirements must be completed prior to Intern Teaching.
*Note: All sections count for honors college credit.
This course is only for seniors who have been admitted to teacher education and have completed all of their professional studies courses. This will be the final field experience consisting of five days per week in an educational setting. Students will synthesize the knowledge, apply the understandings, and practice the skills which they acquired during their University course work. They will participate in all phases of the school program where they are assigned. To be taken concurrently with ED 4100. Prerequisites: All other courses and program requirements must be completed prior to Intern Teaching.Students having lunch with an alumnus while on the Disney Study in the States trip.

ED 4750: Intern Teaching: Mid/Sec School

Various     Varies     5 credit hours     Staff
*Note: In addition to the cost of a five credit class, there is a Student Liability-Education $5.00 Flat Fee
*Restriction: This course is restricted to certain majors. Please see the course listing online for a complete list.
*Note: All sections count for honors college credit.
Students devote a minimum of five days per week for one semester to intern teaching. They are expected to have experience in both the curricular and extra-curricular programs of the school in which they teach.

ENGR 2980: Cooperative Education

Arranged     3 credit hours
*The following classes are restricted from taking this course: Freshman.
A parallel cooperative education program or internship; involves part-time planned and supervised work experience related to a student's major during a semester. A written report of the student's work activities will be required.

ENGR 2990: Cooperative Education

Arranged     3 credit hours
*The following classes are restricted from taking this course: Freshman, Sophomore.
A parallel cooperative education program or internship; involves part-time planned and supervised work experience related to a student's major during a semester. A written report of the student's work activities will be required.

ENGR 3980: Cooperative Education

Arranged     3 credit hours
*The following classes are restricted from taking this course: Freshman, Sophomore.
A parallel cooperative education program or internship; involves part-time planned and supervised work experience related to a student's major during a semester. A written report of the student's work activities will be required.

ENGR 3990: Cooperative Education

Arranged     3 credit hours
*The following classes are restricted from taking this course: Freshman, Sophomore.
A parallel cooperative education program or internship; involves part-time planned and supervised work experience related to a student's major during a semester. A written report of the student's work activities will be required.

HNRS 3990: Field Experience Practicum

Various     Varies     Variable credit hours            
**For course registration, complete the Agreement Form.

Students standing in front of the Golden Gate Bridge on the Disney Study in the States trip. HNRS 4950: Individual Study

Variable credit hours
**For course registration, complete the Agreement Form.

HNRS 4990: Honors College Thesis

Variable credit hours
**For course registration, complete the Registration Form.

OTHER WAYS TO EARN HONORS CREDIT

In addition to the courses listed above, there are many other ways to earn honors credit. Please see below for options according to whether you have a course requirement (joined the honors college prior to the 2014-15 academic year) or credit hour requirement (joined honors college fall 2014 or after). If you are unsure about your specific requirements, please refer to your original requirements letter.

Course Requirement - The following options may count for ONE (1) honors course

  • One field experience or independent study. Visit the the website for more information.
  • Two semesters of a foreign language or American Sign Language. Courses must be taken at WMU after you become a member of the honors college.
  • Two semesters of a music ensemble, dance performance or theatre practicum resulting in academic credit on your transcript.
  • Any study abroad experience that results in academic credit on your transcript.

Credit hour requirement - Up to half of your honors course credit requirement may be satisfied with the options listed below. Students receive experiential honors credits via an approved internship/field experience or independent study for honors credits. Please note that to receive credit for internship/field experience or independent study, the appropriate approval form must be submitted PRIOR to initiation of the experience. It is possible to receive honors credit for more than one field experience or independent study with prior approval by the honors college dean or associate dean. Approval will only be granted if the experiences are substantially different.

  • Independent study, field experience, co-op, internships and clinicals that result in academic credit on your transcript.
  • Four honors credits will be given for two semesters of the same foreign language. May be repeated for additional honors credit for additional foreign language(s). However, no additional honors credit will be given if a student takes more than two semesters of the same language.
  • Honors credit may be awarded for approved non-honors experiential courses in dance, music or theater as well as for participation in a varsity sports course. Up to three credits may be counted toward honors credit hour requirements and these may be accrued by repeating a course, or by taking multiple approved courses. Please see an honors college advisor for details.
  • Study abroad credits appearing on a student's WMU transcript, whether for a WMU course or a course run through another institution, will be counted as honors credit, up to a limit of 3 credits per semester. Multiple study abroad experiences may count for additional honors credit with honors college advisor, associate dean or dean approval.