Call for Papers: In-Person Sessions

This call for papers includes all in-person sponsored and special sessions approved by the Program Committee for the 58th International Congress on Medieval Studies (held in a new hybrid format Thursday through Saturday, May 11–13, 2023), hosted by Western Michigan University's Medieval Institute. Attendees participate in sessions live on location at Western Michigan University's campus in Kalamazoo, MI. The speakers and audience of the session are all present in a physical room.

The sponsored sessions are listed here alphabetically by the name of the principal or sole sponsoring organization, and the special sessions follow alphabetically by session title. Email addresses are masked in the page source to reduce the chances of being harvested by spammers.

You can also view a complete list of all approved sessions and individual lists of all virtual sessions and all blended-format sessions.

You are invited to make one paper proposal to one session of papers: that might be to one of the Sponsored or Special Sessions listed here as a session of papers, which are organized by colleagues around the world, OR to General Sessions, which are organized by the Program Committee in Kalamazoo. You may propose an unlimited number of contributions to roundtables, but you will not be scheduled to actively participate in more than three sessions (including sessions in all formats).

All those hoping or invited to make contributions to sessions of papers or roundtables at the Congress need to make proposals in the Confex system by the deadline of Wednesday, Sept. 15. Contributions to demonstrations, performances, and workshops are not solicited through our proposal system. Interested individuals should approach the contact person directly.

All proposals for sessions of papers (including general sessions) and roundtables are made through the Confex system, where the sessions are grouped by format.

Make a proposal

Sponsored in-person sessions

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14th Century Society

Law and Society in the Fourteenth Century

Contact: Elizabeth P. Kamali (ekamali@law.harvard.edu)
Modality: In person
Marked by plague and protest, feast and famine, the fourteenth century was a time of social complexity and legal innovation. This panel will explore the interplay between law and society, broadly defined, in this tumultuous century. Topics could include: statutory responses to crisis, the interplay between custom and law, choice of forum in a world of competing jurisdictions, the use of written records, and the rise of the legal profession. Papers are welcome on any aspect of this broad theme, and geographic diversity, including beyond the bounds of western Europe, will be a priority in selecting papers for the panel.

Material Culture in the Fourteenth Century

Contact: Sarah Ifft Decker
Modality: In person
The crises of the fourteenth century wrought transformations in economic life and material culture. At the same time, a rich body of source material is available to scholars interested in material culture in the fourteenth century: inventories; wills; depictions of material objects in literature and visual arts; and, of course, material objects themselves. This session seeks papers that explore the relationship between people and things. Contributions from any disciplinary lens—including, but not limited to, history, literature, and art history. Papers may address any type of material culture—decorative or utilitarian, sacred or profane, elite or non-elite, luxurious or humble.

See all sessions organized by 14th Century Society

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Academy of Jewish-Christian Studies

Jewish-Christian Relations II: Jewish-Christian Interaction in the Middle Ages

Contact: Steven J. McMichael
Modality: In person
This session welcomes papers of scholars working on Jewish-Christian relations in terms of literature, theology, art, etc.

See all sessions organized by the Academy of Jewish-Christian Studies

American Benedictine Academy

Benedictine Moderation: The Shifting Balance of Prayer, Work, and Reading

Contact: Hugh Bernard Feiss (hughfeiss@gmail.com)
Modality: In person
In a meditation written in Nazareth in June 1898, Charles de Foucauld wrote that Jesus told him “your time is divided, as mine used to be, between work, prayer, and sacred reading,” a division approved by de Foucauld’s spiritual director. This division derives from the Rule of Benedict as has been seen by commentators as an example of Benedictine moderation and discretio. Papers in this session will in one way or another examine how medieval Benedictines interpreted this division of time in theory and in practice. Were they moderate? How beneficial was this division of time?

American Cusanus Society

Cusanus' Shipboard Experience: A Reevaluation

Contact: Christopher Bellitto (cbellitt@kean.edu)
Modality: In person
In the dedicatory preface to his foundational philosophical work, De docta ignorantia (1440), Nicholas of Cusa stated that he had arrived at his insights through “a celestial gift from the Father of Lights”, while traveling on a galley from Constantinople to Venice. Is it possible that this event was, in fact, an electrical phenomenon as new evidence suggests? If so, what does that mean for Cusanus’ interpretation of this event, which he found so profoundly important for his theological speculative work that followed?

Mysticism and the Visible (A Roundtable)

Cosponsored by: Mystical Theology Network, Univ. of Oxford
Contact: Christopher Bellitto (cbellitt@kean.edu)
Modality: In person
Panelists will present on topics related to the place and function of visual sensory or quasi-sensory input and phenomena in mystical praxis and experiences. From apparitions of persons and objects to the use of art as aid in contemplation, this panel will discuss the importance of the visible across different genres of mystical apprehensions. This is a timely topic given the recent discussion of these themes in Jeffrey F. Hamburger’s Color in Cusanus (Stuttgart: Hiersemann, 2021). Panelists are further encouraged to comment upon either the influence between mysticism and artistic style or mysticism and the natural in art.

See all sessions organized by the American Cusanus Society

American Numismatic Society

Innovation in Medieval Coinage and Money

Contact: David Yoon (dyoon@numismatics.org)
Modality: In person
The Middle Ages are understood as a time of major technological developments. Medieval coinage and money were no exception, with important innovations ranging from material techniques such as letter and device punches to information technologies such as the bill of exchange. This session will explore the creation and spread of technological changes in coinage and money in Europe and the Mediterranean world during the Middle Ages.

American Society of Irish Medieval Studies (ASIMS)

Farrell Lecture: Ethics in Medieval Ireland and the Ethics of Medieval Irish Studies

Contact: Larissa Tracy (kattracy@comcast.net)
Modality: In person
For the annual ASIMS Farrell Lecture, Dr. Elizabeth Boyle of Maynooth University, Ireland, will weave together the past and the present, addressing two questions: first, to what extent can we identify a concept of 'virtue ethics' in early medieval Ireland, as a philosophical strand of thinking not necessarily (or at least not wholly) derived from Christian morality? And second, how do we delineate and practice an ethics of the scholarly study of medieval Ireland in the twenty-first century, ensuring the development of an inclusive and equitable discipline? Westley Follett, Professor of History, University of Southern Mississippi will be the respondent.

Who's in Charge Here? Female Authority and the Medieval Irish Church

Contact: Larissa Tracy (kattracy@comcast.net)
Modality: In person
This session invites 15–20 minute papers dealing with any aspect of female authority in/and the Irish medieval Church, broadly construed. We encourage in particular papers that challenge traditional disciplinary and methodological boundaries, including interdisciplinary/comparative approaches and the use of hagiographical, archaeological, and/or historical sources, employing gender, material, philological, and digital humanities lenses and theories.

Arthurian Literature

Labor and Workers in or around the Arthurian Tradition

Contact: K. S. Whetter (kevin.whetter@acadiau.ca)
Modality: In person
This session questions several critical axioms about Arthurian literature. Texts and critics often emphasize the knight in mediaeval Arthurian literature; other scholars emphasize the importance of women to the tradition, Arthurian art can be found in religious settings, and manuscript evidence indicates chivalric and mercantile readers. Within the texts, the more famous knights and gentry ladies often rely on the unsung assistance of hermits, messengers, healers, and others to complete their quests. Yet Arthurian literature is generally associated with the chivalric class. This session invites papers from any methodology that explore non-armigerous characters in, or audiences around, Arthurian literature.

Arthuriana

The Arthurian Legend as Sites of Resistance (A Roundtable)

Contact: Margaret Leigh Sheble (mlsheble@gmail.com)
Modality: In person
This session will explore scenes of resistance in Arthurian texts/media and uses of the legend as a source of resistance and a tool for action—particularly how Arthurian literature and media promote resistance and push back against the legend’s more violent associations. We welcome papers from a wide range of disciplines such as medieval or contemporary literature, art, music, pedagogy, film, games, exhibitions, fanfiction, tourism, and more! Please submit a title and abstract of 300 words through the International Congress on Medieval Studies submission portal and expect your presentation to be no more than 10 minutes.

Association for Spanish and Portuguese Historical Studies

Feeding the Body, Feeding the Soul: Materiality in Late Medieval Iberia

Cosponsored by: Mens et Mensa: Society for the Study of Food in the Middle Ages
Contact: Jessica A. Boon
Modality: In person
Food, feasting, and fasting are consistent themes and powerfully resonant metaphors across many genres of late medieval Iberian works from the Latin Christian tradition, including hagiographic narratives, miracle tales, exempla, poetry, sermons, and visionary texts. While the obvious reference point is the Eucharist, this panel argues that food imagery provides fertile points of critical departure and a range of material approaches for examinations of morality, theology, gender roles, and textual practices.

AVISTA: The Association Villard de Honnecourt for the Interdisciplinary Study of Medieval Technology, Science, and Art

American Gothic I: 1940–1970

Contact: Robert Bork
Modality: In person
Scholars based in North America have significantly enriched the study of Gothic architecture since the mid-twentieth century. This session, the first of three, examines the decades during and following the Second World War when European expatriates including Erwin Panofsky, Henri Focillon, Otto von Simson, Paul Frankl, and Jean Bony made fundamental contributions to the field while simultaneously training students who would become influential scholars in their own rights. This session welcomes papers considering the impact of these figures and their contemporaries, as well as papers addressing the development of trends and/or lacunae in the era’s scholarship.

American Gothic II: 1970–2000

Contact: Robert Bork
Modality: In person
Scholars based in North America have significantly enriched the study of Gothic architecture since the mid-twentieth century. This session, the second of three, examines the period from 1970–2000, which witnessed the growth of organizations including the ICMA and AVISTA, and the emergence of a new cohort interested in applying innovative analytical methods ranging from the socio-economic to the structural. Contributors to this session should consider the impact of researchers working in those transformative decades. Additional approaches might include considering methodological applications; discussing the international reception of North American scholarship; or analyzing trends and/or lacunae in the era’s scholarship.

American Gothic III: 2000–2030

Contact: Robert Bork
Modality: In person
Scholars based in North America have significantly enriched the study of Gothic architecture since the mid-twentieth century, effectively complementing the work of their European colleagues. This session, the third of three, examines the decades since the millennium Technology continues to transform methods of study and collaboration, but architecture has been displaced from center stage in the study of medieval art, and the humanities generally confront many challenges. This session welcomes papers considering recent trends such as these, speculating on upcoming trends, or evaluating the formation of blind spots in North American scholarship—what is missing, and why?

American Gothic IV (A Roundtable)

Contact: Robert Bork
Modality: In person
Scholars based in America have significantly enriched the study of Gothic architecture since the middle of the twentieth century, effectively complementing the work of their European colleagues. This roundtable, conceived in relation to three regular sessions, invites panelists and the audience to discuss these contributions, the professional organizations and networks that have fostered them, and the prospects for future development in the field. Although the discussion should evolve organically, prospective panelists should provide the organizers with brief (100–200 word) paragraphs outlining themes that they would like to address and explaining how their background prepares them to comment on them.

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Beinecke Rare Book & Manuscript Library, Yale Univ.

Access, Silence, and Exclusion in the Archives

Contact: Gina Marie Hurley
Modality: In person
Thanks to the contributions of critical archival studies, scholars of material culture are increasingly turning their attention toward an interrogation of the archive: what voices are included, and which ones are silenced? Who gets to collect, and what objects are, or have been, deemed worthy of collection? Who is welcomed into archival spaces, and who is excluded? These questions are especially critical for medievalists attempting to create equitable classrooms, and this panel will explore them through a pedagogical lens, asking how we can invite our students into close engagement with our collections and into an interrogation of their ethical dimensions.

Building a Teaching Collection of Manuscripts and Early Books

Contact: Gina Marie Hurley
Modality: In person
With rising interest in teaching material culture, more medievalists are assembling their own teaching collections of manuscripts and early books. That collecting, even when underwritten by institutional funds, is often undertaken by individuals who are new to book collecting—and who may not have substantial guidance within their institutions. This session addresses that gap, providing information about provenance research, ethical collecting, and budgeting, all in service of developing a collection that can support a wide range of pedagogical needs. In so doing, the panel seeks to promote and encourage object-based learning at a wider range of institutions.

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C. S. Lewis and the Middle Ages

C. S. Lewis and the Middle Ages I: Narnian Medievalism: A Reappraisal

Contact: Joe Ricke (jsricke@outlook.com)
Modality: In person
Sometimes the most obvious examples of medievalism are right under our noses. C. S. Lewis obviously invested his imaginary world of Narnia with all sorts of medieval images, plots, themes, and characters. Not to mention costumes, props, and, sometimes, the awful language of tongue-in-cheek medievalism. We seek scholarly papers not so much reminding us of what we know, but reappraising what we thought we knew, about Narnian medievalism, with special emphases on cultural difference, race, gender, visionary experience, as well as topics we have not yet imagined.

C. S. Lewis and the Middle Ages II: “Renaissance? What Renaissance?”: Lewis's Bold Challenge to More, Erasmus, and Everyone Else

Contact: Joe Ricke (jsricke@outlook.com)
Modality: In person
Sometimes the most obvious examples of medievalism are right under our noses. C. S. Lewis obviously invested his imaginary world of Narnia with all sorts of medieval images, plots, themes, and characters. Not to mention costumes, props, and, sometimes, the awful language of tongue-in-cheek medievalism. We seek scholarly papers not so much reminding us of what we know, but reappraising what we thought we knew, about Narnian medievalism, with special emphases on cultural difference, race, gender, visionary experience, as well as topics we have not yet imagined.

Center for Cistercian and Monastic Studies, Western Michigan Univ.

The Animate Cosmos in Cistercian Theology and Speculative Naturalism

Contact: Jason R Crow (jason.crow@monash.edu)
Modality: In person
Spirituality of the world belongs to both creation theology and soteriology. Drawing on sources going back to the Timaeus, and on their lives with the Psalms, the Cistercians, dwelling in monastic microcosms, articulated Christological meaning for the world’s goodness in the lives of repentant sinners ranging from a world with beatific potential to a well-defined sense of the cosmos as good in itself and good for the soul that seeks divine unification. This panel seeks papers that explore what the cosmological understandings of world offer Cistercian theology, might offer contemporary philosophies of the environment, regardless of time period or location.

The Cistercians: Winemakers to the World

Contact: Jean A. Truax
Modality: In person
This session invites paper that will explore historical and contemporary relationships between the Cistercians and the wine industry and that shed light on the relationship of wine production to the material, economic, and spiritual life of Cistercian monasteries.

Cistercian Influence on Medieval Vernacular Literature

Contact: Marsha L. Dutton (dutton@ohio.edu)
Modality: In person
Papers are requested exploring the presence of Cistercian thought and themes in medieval literature in vernacular languages.

Cistercian Mysticism

Contact: Aage Rydstrøm-Poulsen (aarp@uni.gl)
Modality: In person
Mysticism is a most crucial phenomenon in the history of culture of the Western world since it deals with the highest goals and values of the human life. It was an important part of the Medieval monastic world and together with many other things it influenced deeply the intellectual culture of the Western world. The history of mysticism in the Western world is a history about the highest and most important ambitions and possibilities of the individual regarding the understanding of oneself and the divine. The focus of the session will be on the Cistercian contribution to this history.

Cistercian Saints Since the Fifteenth Century

Contact: Jay Butler
Modality: In person
Cistercian saints in the medieval period have received much attention. But the Cistercians have also supplied many canonized saints in the late medieval, early modern, and modern periods. This panel will explore Cistercians since the fifteenth century who have been canonized and how their spirituality may have been formed by their monastic life among the Cistercians.

Forgotten Cistercians

Contact: Jason R Crow (jason.crow@monash.edu)
Modality: In person
At the 2022 Cistercian & Monastic Studies Conference, several forgotten Cistercians, including Eutropious Proust, and Juan Caramuel y Lobkowitz, and Sophia were re-introduced, proving and elucidating the broad influence of the Cistercian community outside of the twelfth-century boundaries that often delimit our research. Many intriguing Cistercians remain to be re-discovered. Continuing the effort, launched by Jean Traux last year, this panel seeks to further identify and spark interest in the lives and accomplishments of unnoticed Cistercians, regardless of their time period or location. Of particular interest, are those individuals, like Boccone and Lobkowitz, whose writings intersect theology and science.

Center for Inter-American and Border Studies, Univ. of Texas–El Paso

Borders of Taste: The Gastronomical Limits of Medieval Iberia

Cosponsored by: Ibero-Medieval Association of North America (IMANA)
Contact: Matthew V. Desing (mvdesing2@utep.edu)
Modality: In person
Foods grown, consumed, and held in esteem are means by which groups have drawn distinctions among themselves for millennia. In the case of Medieval Iberia, with the cohabitation of the “Three Religions of the Book,” this was particularly the case. But religious difference in food consumption is only one type of gastronomical limit. Geographical and climatic differences set limits of crops raised, and economic differences determined the accessibility of certain ingredients. This session welcomes proposals from a variety of disciplines whose objects of study demonstrate the various gastronomical borders of the Iberian Peninsula in the Middle Ages.

Problematizing Medieval Borders: Limits and Liminality in the Study of Medieval Iberia

Cosponsored by: Ibero-Medieval Association of North America (IMANA)
Contact: Matthew V. Desing (mvdesing2@utep.edu)
Modality: In person
As a broader field, Border Studies is usually associated with physical boundaries among modern nation-states, often examined from a Post-Colonial perspective. There has been widespread academic debate about the applicability of such approaches in medieval contexts. This being the case, this session aims to interrogate what it means to do Border Studies within Medieval Studies, and specifically in an Ibero-Medieval Context. The organizers welcome proposals that approach this topic and these questions from a variety of disciplinary perspectives.

Center for Medieval and Early Modern Studies, Stanford Univ.

Crossing Boundaries with Medieval Saints

Contact: Lauren W. Adams (laurenadams@stanford.edu)
Modality: In person
The medieval cult of saints resided at a hazy verge between the material world and the spiritual one. From the inception of saint veneration in late antiquity and throughout its expansion over the Middle Ages, this pantheon of powerful figures continually sundered, redefined, and crossed cultural boundaries. We invite papers that explore a specific aspect within this larger framework: how did medieval saints cross boundaries of gender and sexuality? Examples may include accounts of women saints who lived as monks or male hermits, reformed prostitutes who became exemplars, or saints who were conceived via supernatural or non-sexual methods.

Making History with Manuscripts (A Roundtable)

Contact: Johannes Junge Ruhland (jmjr@stanford.edu)
Modality: In person
This roundtable brings together scholars who share the premise that material aspects of historiographical manuscripts impact what history is. Working with any methodology that places manuscripts first in their study of medieval historiography broadly understood, panelists are invited to prepare 5- to 10-minute presentations of a case study before sharing perspectives, questions, and queries about method, book history, and disciplinary trends. A list of possible questions for discussion will be shared with panelists prior to the roundtable, and questions from the audience will be encouraged. Scholars working on non-Western traditions are particularly welcome to apply.

Soul and Body Literature

Contact: Antonio Lenzo (alenzo@stanford.edu)
Modality: In person
This panel brings together papers discussing examples of so-called Soul and Body literature originating between the 11th and 14th centuries. This widely diffused literary trope pits the Soul and the Body against one another in debate or confrontation, often at the moment of death or shortly after. Presenters are encouraged to offer studies drawing on a variety of disciplines, including literary history, rhetorical analysis, manuscript studies, queer theory, history of thought and religion. Proposals focusing on Soul and Body literature in manuscript context are particularly welcome.

Center for Medieval and Early Modern Studies, Univ. of Colorado–Boulder

Manuscript Compilation, Poetics of Compilation

Contact: Tiffany Beechy
Modality: In person
The session invites both traditional and innovative work on the poetics of compilation in the medieval period. We no longer consider medieval scribes or compilers as complete bumblers, and we tend to accept that even happenstance can produce a meaningful arrangement. Decades of more narrow scholarship have likely missed information that may be gleaned through a generous approach to medieval manuscripts. Many kinds of approach to medieval compilations are welcome, particularly those producing insight, new knowledge, and/or delight.

Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies, St. Louis Univ.

In Honor of Ray Wakefield: Norse-Continental Comparative Medievalisms

Cosponsored by: Society for Medieval Germanic Studies (SMGS)
Contact: Evelyn Meyer (evelyn.meyer@slu.edu)
Modality: In person
Traditional scholarship has been obsessed over finding narrative origins and then claiming, in almost patriotic terms, that a particular modern nation had been “home” for the “original.” This session seeks to explore Norse–Continental literary relations that debunk these myths and instead to showcase the dynamic intersections of this literary and cultural exchange across a significant part of the medieval world, both during medieval times and all the way to modern times. This theme has received relatively little scholarly attention and this session therefore aims to spur conversation among Norse and continental scholars and to encourage innovative research into it.

Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies, Univ. of Oklahoma

Visualizing Arthuriana

Cosponsored by: Rossell Hope Robbins Library, Univ. of Rochester
Contact: Joyce Coleman (joyce.coleman@ou.edu)
Modality: In person
This session seeks papers that explore how seeing Arthuriana—as opposed to, or in conjunction with, reading it—can enhance, challenge, reframe, and otherwise enlarge the viewers’ engagement with the tradition, in any period and any form of media. What happened, for example, when a medieval person read a text and then looked at the accompanying illumination? What would happen if the illumination didn’t match the text they’d just read? How did medieval and later people relate to the architecture, the objects, the paintings that embodied Arthuriania? How does the visible presence of non-white actors at the Round Table challenge established perceptions?

Center for Premodern Studies, Univ. of Minnesota–Twin Cities

Affective Borders and Emotional Landscapes: Interiority in Medieval Mediterranean Studies

Contact: Alexander Korte
Modality: In person
The Center for Premodern Studies at UMinnesota seeks proposals for our sponsored session “Affective Borders and Emotional Landscapes: Interiority in Medieval Mediterranean Studies.” Affect Theory is helping the discipline think more comparatively about the role of emotions and sensory stimuli in the development of medieval letters. Senses, and the emotional responses they elicit, play a fundamental role in the negotiation of the self with the collective. This panel aims to explore how medieval Mediterranean authors relied on prevailing notions of feeling (broadly defined) to craft their work and codify into letters the multifaceted experience of their contemporary world.

At the Edges of the French World: Conquerors, Colonizers, and Crusaders in the Wider Mediterranean

Contact: Stephan Knott (knott133@umn.edu)
Modality: In person
The focus of most scholarly attention on medieval French history has been on a small area in northern France. Yet during the High Middle Ages French-speaking aristocracies were at home throughout the wider Mediterranean. They went as conquerors, colonizers, and crusaders and interacted with the societies they encountered in a variety of ways. These exchanges altered their own sense of identity and had profound consequences far beyond the local realities. Our session will explore some of these interactions to better understand the full breadth of the French or Frankish experience and challenge grand narratives about the rise of the West.

Piracy and Captivity in the Medieval Mediterranean

Contact: Alexander Korte
Modality: In person
The Center for Premodern Studies at UMinnesota seeks proposals for our sponsored session “Piracy and Captivity in the Medieval Mediterranean.” Mediterranean Studies is helping the field think more comparatively and bring into dialogue scholars working in many fields from Spanish, French, Arabic and Italian. Piracy and captivity affected the global Mediterranean in a way that linked multiple cultures and linguistic traditions through raiding, sea voyages, and the slave trade. This panel aims to explore how medieval Mediterranean authors crafted the image of the pirate—as well as the journey of their captives—and made sense of this dangerous and ubiquitous enterprise.

Center for Thomistic Studies, Univ. of St. Thomas, Houston

Thomistic Philosophy I–III

Contact: Steven J. Jensen
Modality: In person
These sessions are devoted to philosophical or theological thought connected to Thomas Aquinas. Paper submissions will be accepted for any topic concerning the philosophy or theology of Aquinas, his sources, or contemporary applications of his thought.

Centre for Ancient and Medieval Philosophy

Medieval Notebooks: Academic, Cultural and Social Ramifications of the Practice of Note-Taking in the Middle Ages

Contact: Alexandra Baneu (alexandra.baneu@yahoo.com)
Modality: In person
The study of medieval note-taking gives insight into how the classroom functioned, on how individuals worked with their notes, and on how certain practices and pieces of knowledge were transmitted by notebooks. Besides this knowledge related to medieval academia, notebooks also provide the researcher special insight into the culture of the time and the social status of their owner. Papers focusing on particular case-studies of notebooks from the Middle Ages are invited. This session is supported by the ERC Starting Grant NOTA “Note-Taking and Notebooks as Channels of Medieval Academic Dissemination across Europe” (project code 948152).

Centre for Fantasy and the Fantastic, Univ. of Glasgow

Ursula K. Le Guin's Marvelous Medievalism

Contact: Kristine A. Swank
Modality: In person
Ursula K. Le Guin (1929–2018) left an unparalleled legacy of masterworks in science fiction and fantasy. Several of her imagined worlds were founded upon or enriched by global medieval influences from Europe, Asia, North & South America. This paper session will explore and examine some of Le Guin’s marvelous medievalisms, her sources and influences, and their effects on her fiction. Papers might employ any scholarly approach. Possible texts include Always Coming Home, Annals of the Western Shore (Gifts, Voices, Powers), The Beginning Place, Earthsea series, Eye of the Heron, Hainish cycle, Lavinia, Orsinian Tales, and Le Guin’s short stories.

See all sessions organized by the Centre for Fantasy and the Fantastic, Univ. of Glasgow

Chaucer Review

Chaucer's Temporalities I: Medieval and Ancient

Contact: David Raybin (draybin@eiu.edu)
Modality: In person
A persistent borrower from Classical poets and historians, Chaucer sets many of his narratives in the distant past of Rome, Troy, and various other ancient Christian and non-Christian spaces. His themes and ideas, however, are distinctly of his own time and place. Chaucer borrows, adapts, and sometimes completely rethinks and locates his sources, and his characters’ voices reveal the courts, schools, streets, and suburbs of medieval London, Oxford, and Paris. This session seeks papers that explore how Chaucer’s temporalities reflect his embeddedness in and adaptation of the discourses of his Antique forebears.

Chaucer's Temporalities II: Medieval and Modern

Contact: David Raybin (draybin@eiu.edu)
Modality: In person
Even as Chaucer has been praised through the centuries as the consummate poet of medieval English, contemporary scholars often question the (in)sensitivity of his attitudes about such value-laden topics as gender, sexuality, and family, politics and warfare, and science and religion. For this session, we seek papers that examine how modern Chaucer scholarship evaluates his narratives on our terms, how we rigorously examine his fourteenth-century consciousness in the light of twenty-first-century issues and principles. Papers that offer modern critiques of Chaucer’s contemporaries are also welcome.

Chaucer's Temporalities IV: Sacred Time

Contact: Susanna Fein
Modality: In person
Even as Chaucer often denies knowledge of what happens to a person after death, his poetry constantly treats the imminence and finality of death. As is common among his Christian, Jewish, and Muslim contemporaries, he often alludes to the afterlife as well, that is, to judgment, eternity, end times, and a final destiny of the soul. His tones range from the somber to the comic. We seek papers that delve into Chaucer’s thinking on sacred time.

See all sessions organized by Chaucer Review

Cleveland Museum of Art

New Research on Later Medieval Alabaster Sculpture I: The Rimini Master, the International Gothic and Early Netherlandish Art Reconsidered

Contact: Gerhard Lutz (glutz@clevelandart.org)
Modality: In person
The material alabaster, which reached its zenith in fifteenth century sculpture in Germany, the Netherlands, France and Spain, for example with the so-called Rimini Master, but also Tilman Riemenschneider, has only recently come back into focus. These works are characterized above all by their high quality and were often made for special commissions. This session focuses on the circle of the so-called Rimini Master and its importance for Early Netherlandish art. Paper proposals with different methodological approaches, including technological aspects and questions of materiality and perception are particularly welcome.

New Research on Later Medieval Alabaster Sculpture II: Tilman Riemenschneider: Materiality at the Dawn of the Reformation

Contact: Gerhard Lutz (glutz@clevelandart.org)
Modality: In person
The material alabaster, which reached its zenith in fifteenth century sculpture in Germany, the Netherlands, France and Spain, for example with the so-called Rimini Master, but also Tilman Riemenschneider, has only recently come back into focus. These works are characterized above all by their high quality and were often made for special commissions. This session will focus on the sculptor Tilman Riemenschneider with a focus on questions of materiality during the decades before the reformation. Paper proposals combining different methodological approaches are particularly welcome.

CU Mediterranean Studies Group

Death in the Mediterranean I–II

Contact: Nuria Silleras-Fernandez (silleras@colorado.edu)
Modality: In person
Papers are sought that explore how people of various classes, genders, and religious traditions grappled with death, memorialized it, sanctified it or vilified it across the Mediterranean world, and to see how Christians, Muslims, and Jews from Europe, North Africa and West Asia commemorated, avenged, feared or forestalled death, and how they imagined it in art, literature and song. Interdisciplinary and comparative papers are particularly welcome as are those that employ innovative methodologies or approaches.

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D. B. Reinhart Institute for Ethics in Leadership, Viterbo Univ.

Tolkien and the Middle Ages: Tolkien and the Scholastics

Contact: Michael A. Wodzak
Modality: In person
Most scholarship on the medieval influences on Tolkien tends to concern story and myth, and while there has been research on the influence of late Classical thinkers such as Boethius and Augustine on his writing, the Roman Catholicism that the author attested was important to his world building owes at least as much to the thought of such theologians as Aquinas, Bonaventure and Scotus. This session intends to explore the influences of thinkers of the “High Middle Ages” on Tolkien, and is a sequel to the session on Tolkien and Evil held at the 57th ICMS.

Dante Society of America

Dante I–III

Contact: Akash Kumar
Modality: In person
The Dante Society of America is proposing 3 open sessions that invite scholars to engage with the work of Dante Alighieri both from within the field of Dante Studies and through a multitude of interdisciplinary perspectives. Coming off the centenary year of 2021, we are interested in a wide range of approaches such as those that seek to historicize Dante, those that consider his work in dialogue with global medieval culture, and those that consider the long history of his multicultural reception.

De Re Militari: The Society for Medieval Military History

Medieval Military History I: Early Medieval Warfare

Contact: Valerie Eads (veads@sva.edu)
Modality: In person
This session focuses on the period from Late Antiquity to the Central Middle Ages, roughly the sixth to twelfth centuries. Papers discussing all aspects of medieval warfare, broadly defined, are welcome.

Medieval Military History II: Late Medieval Warfare

Contact: Valerie Eads (veads@sva.edu)
Modality: In person
This session focuses on the period from the Central Middle Ages to the Early Modern period, roughly the thirteenth through sixteenth centuries. Papers discussing all aspects of medieval warfare, broadly defined, are welcome.

Medieval Military History III: Communications and Logistics

Contact: Valerie Eads (veads@sva.edu)
Modality: In person
This session focuses on the period from Late Antiquity to the Early Modern period, roughly the fourth through sixteenth centuries. Papers discussing all aspects of military communications and logistics, broadly defined, are welcome.

Medieval Military History IV: Medieval Military Technology

Contact: Valerie Eads (veads@sva.edu)
Modality: In person
This session focuses on the technology of warfare, broadly defined, throughout the Middle Ages. Papers discussing all aspects of medieval warfare are welcome.

See all sessions organized by De Re Militari: The Society for Medieval Military History

Dept. of English, Temple Univ.

Talking Back: Black Feminist Approaches to Medieval Studies (A Roundtable)

Contact: Carissa M. Harris
Modality: In person
This roundtable focuses on liberation-driven approaches to medieval scholarship which build upon Black feminism’s foundational commitment to challenging inequity, probing how different forms of power and domination intersect with one another, and seeking justice. In light of the field’s ongoing negotiations with its dedication to equity and broader crises of social injustice, this session examines the medieval roots of harmful ideologies—and strategies of resistance—to shape better institutional and global futures. We seek talks addressing inequities in the medieval past, the field of medieval studies, and the wider world we inhabit. We particularly solicit talks explicitly situated within Black feminist thought.

Digital Philology: A Journal of Medieval Cultures

Beyond Boosterism: Diversity, Inclusion, and Digital Medieval Studies

Contact: Deborah L. McGrady
Modality: In person
After a period of boosterism surrounding digital democratization and big data, healthy skepticism is fueling a period of re-envisioning what actually needs to occur for diversity, equity, and inclusion to be central values. This session welcomes similar skepticism and corrective work in regards to digital medieval studies. How are data and digital work contributing to diversity and inclusion in medieval studies, and how are they—whether by design or accident—reifying existing structures of exclusion?

Failure and Digital Medieval Studies

Contact: Bridget Whearty
Modality: In person
Failure remains a major unwritten part of the disciplinary history of digital medieval studies. By not knowing what others have tried (and failed at) before, we risk reinventing already-invented wheels; by only celebrating success stories, we risk disincentivizing digital work. This session aims to foster conversations about the value of digital failures and how we can accurately assess concepts like “success” and “failure” in a field that measures time in decades and centuries. We invite talks on shuttered or otherwise inaccessible projects, contemporary creative data reuse from earlier “failed” projects, unseen projects & medievalists doing important disciplinary work .

DISTAFF (Discussion, Interpretation, and Study of Textile Arts, Fabrics, and Fashion)

Dress and Textiles I: Mysteries and Obscurities

Contact: Robin Netherton (robin@netherton.net)
Modality: In person
DISTAFF (Discussion, Interpretation, and Study of Textile Arts, Fabrics, and Fashion) invites paper proposals for “Dress and Textiles I: Mysteries and Obscurities.” This session is designed to showcase new research on problematic dress and textile references from a range of source types. We particularly encourage interdisciplinary analyses that contextualize and illuminate these references with complementary data from other types of sources. Papers presented at the session will also be assessed for publication potential in the journal Medieval Clothing and Textiles.

Dress and Textiles II: Embellishment and Decoration

Contact: Robin Netherton (robin@netherton.net)
Modality: In person
DISTAFF (Discussion, Interpretation, and Study of Textile Arts, Fabrics, and Fashion) invites paper proposals for “Dress and Textiles II: Embellishment and Decoration.” This session is designed to showcase new research on actual examples and methods as well as on interpretation of depictions in art and writing. Any scholarly approach to medieval or early modern textiles and clothing is welcome, but we particularly encourage interdisciplinary analyses that contextualize and illuminate the topic with complementary data from multiple types of sources. Papers presented at the session will also be assessed for publication potential in the journal Medieval Clothing and Textiles.

See all sessions organized by DISTAFF (Discussion, Interpretation, and Study of Textile Arts, Fabrics, and Fashion)

Dumbarton Oaks Medieval Library

Medical Remedies in Early Medieval England and Other Cultures of Northwest Europe

Contact: Daniel Donoghue
Modality: In person
Old English and other vernaculars of northwest Europe produced abundant remedies to preserve health. Some of these texts clearly draw from Latin sources, which in turn might derive from Greek, Egyptian, and Middle Eastern traditions. Others have no known textual tradition behind them and seem to owe much to the local experience of practitioners spanning many generations. Some remedies address familiar ailments like poor digestion, headaches, and difficult childbirth, while others offer magical protection from demonic possession or witchcraft. The focus of this session will be on vernacular remedies, but not to the exclusion of Latin or other languages.

See all sessions organized by Dumbarton Oaks Medieval Library

Dumbarton Oaks Research Library and Collection

Coins and Seals in Byzantium

Cosponsored by: Princeton Univ. Numismatic Collection
Contact: Jonathan Shea
Modality: In person
Byzantine coins and seals survive in enormous numbers, and thus provide some of the most important sources of evidence for economic and administrative history, historical geography, imperial messaging, and individual identity. Lead seals in particular are under exploited by scholars despite the rich onomastic and prosopographic data encoded on each specimen. Although focusing on coins and seals from Byzantium this panel welcomes speakers working on materials from a comparative perspective.

See all sessions organized by Dumbarton Oaks Research Library and Collection

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Early Book Society

Anonymous Makers: Scribes, Artists, Printers

Contact: Martha W. Driver (mdriver@pace.edu)
Modality: In person
This session considers the problems of identifying scribes, artists or printers, which have been the subject of lively recent debate. Scholars are encouraged to discuss their first-hand observations of problematic issues of identification in a specific case or cases, perhaps with brief reference to previous scholarship, OR they may wish to link a MS, illumination, woodcut, or printed book with a known scribe, artist or printer.

Lost Manuscripts and Printed Books

Contact: Martha W. Driver (mdriver@pace.edu)
Modality: In person
In 2019, Daniel Sawyer (Merton College, Oxford) spoke to the international EBS conference in Dublin on “The books we lack.” Lost texts (and illustrations) pose a perennial problem for scholars. One wonders about Sir Thomas Malory’s French book, manuscripts and books mentioned in wills (rarely by title), books lent and lost (the Pastons’ Troilus lent to the Widow Wyngfelde), the “Book of Gower” cited in the will of Elizabeth Kyngeston Findern, and many others. Many medieval books are copies of copies; papers in this session will discuss non-extant books and their influence on the manuscripts and books that survive today.

Psalms in Manuscript and Print

Contact: Martha W. Driver (mdriver@pace.edu)
Modality: In person
The Psalter, a staple of medieval devotion, could be modest or deluxe, depending on the tastes and finances of its owner. This session looks at the ways in which the Psalms are presented in manuscripts and/or printed books. Speakers might discuss illustration, layout or translation from Latin into Middle English or French. Papers could consider allusions to the Psalms in marginalia or in reader annotations of the Psalms or of other works.

Teaching and Learning in Medieval Manuscripts and/or Printed Books

Contact: Martha W. Driver (mdriver@pace.edu)
Modality: In person
Medieval education, whether in Latin or the vernacular, is the focus of this session. Papers might consider the production of schoolbooks, student notebooks, even courtesy books, as guides to the correct use of language, literary or classical learning, and proper behavior. Along with grammars by John Stanbridge, Robert Whittinton, John of Garland, Donatus, and John Holt, works like Lydgate’s English translation of Stans puer ad mensam (The Child at the Table) or his Book of Curtesye, also known as “Little John,” as well as Aesop and Ovid, were viewed as instructive texts, and circulated in both manuscript and print.

See all sessions organized by Early Book Society

Early Proverb Society

Wisdom Literature on the Move

Contact: Karl Arthur Erik Persson (kpersson@seatofwisdom.ca)
Modality: In person
The key form to be considered is the mercurial proverb, but broader remarks are welcome. Fundamental questions of defining and classifying medieval proverbs include desiderata for study of the global proverb beyond the “usual suspects” of Latin and Western European languages. Some possible approaches might include thinking about proverbs as “strategic signs” in sociopolitical discourse (Mieder 2018); revisting the tactics of the proverb as summation; and querying the traditional assemblage of proverbs into collections. Thoughts on the “anti-”proverb are invited, as well as on the general characterization of proverbs as repositories of authority or as “vulgar aphorisms” (Lord Chesterfield).

Episcopus: Society for the Study of Bishops and Secular Clergy in the Middle Ages

Mendicant Friars and the Secular Church: Controversy, Coexistence, Collaboration

Cosponsored by: Franciscan Institute, St. Bonaventure Univ.
Contact: William H. Campbell (whc7@pitt.edu)
Modality: In person
From c. 1215 onward, the Latin church had two parallel structures for reaching the laity, the seculars and the mendicants. As the latter exploded in numbers and popularity, the two became rivals, sometimes espousing radically different agendas for reform and concepts of the nature of the church itself. From time to time, this broke into open conflict. But the two could often co-operate, as when a parish priest invited a friar to preach, or even overlap, as when a friar was elected to the episcopate. Papers are invited that address the nature of these complex relationships.

See all sessions organized by Episcopus: Society for the Study of Bishops and Secular Clergy in the Middle Ages

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Framing the Late Antique and Early Medieval Economy (FLAME)

The Early Medieval Economy: New Opportunities and Challenges

Contact: Lee Mordechai
Modality: In person
Papers on aspects of the early medieval economy, including but not limited to topics such as economic networks or coin circulation, would be welcome.

Franciscan Institute, St. Bonaventure Univ.

Bonaventure as a Reader of Albertus Magnus

Contact: Lezlie S. Knox (lezlie.knox@marquette.edu)
Modality: In person
Bonaventure’s well-known reliance on the Franciscan School at Paris and the works produced by Alexander of Hales and his circle of early thirteenth-century theologians can be seen clearly in his own Sentences Commentary—but where Bonaventure includes sources absent from Hales’ Gloss on the Sentences, a precedent is not infrequently found in Albert the Great’s own commentary. This session invites papers that examine both Bonaventure’s use of Albert as a direct source and the wider intellectual exchange between the Franciscan and Dominicans schools in Paris.

Salimbene and Trecento Italy

Cosponsored by: Italians and Italianists at Kalamazoo
Contact: Lezlie S. Knox (lezlie.knox@marquette.edu)
Modality: In person
The peppery friar’s Latin chronicle covering the years 1168–1287 offers an important perspective on medieval Italian politics and society. We seek papers using Salimbene to explore not only his own order and its place in society, but also the chronicle’s role in framing the Italian Middle Ages. We are especially interested in how his concerns as a Franciscan intersect with broader culture and so highlight the state of the field and new directions in research.

See all sessions organized by Franciscan Institute, St. Bonaventure Univ.

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Game Cultures Society

Games and Medievalism I: The Middle Ages on the Board

Contact: Sarah J. Sprouse (ssprouse@wtamu.edu)
Modality: In person
There have been excellent studies of the ways the Middle Ages is presented, represented and misrepresented in modern video games, but critical study of analog games lags behind. And yet, medieval-themed board and card games are wildly popular, covering topics from Vikings (Feast of Odin) to art (Sagrada) and literature (Beowulf), the Islamic world (Merv), and even Plague (Rattus Cartus), let alone the current popularity of fantasy role-play like D&D. In what ways do board and card games reflect and reinforce contemporary misconceptions about the Middle Ages, and how can games inform or even disrupt these tropes?

Games and Medievalism II: Reading Games in Medieval Culture

Contact: Sarah J. Sprouse (ssprouse@wtamu.edu)
Modality: In person
Cultural game theorists have analyzed texts as games or how games are a fruitful analogical lens for examining literature, suggesting that storytellers and audiences play with or against each other within textual game spaces. Medieval manuscripts likewise highlight text as game, with marginalia left by scribes, readers, and illuminators indicating that texts were often understood as interactive games. Texts were also frequently performed, and audiences actively engaged with them by adopting theatrical, playful roles. This session proposes to explore the gaming relationships between texts, audiences, and storytellers to better understand how literary games served people of the Middle Ages.

Medieval Gaming: Playing with Pedagogy (A Roundtable)

Contact: Sarah J. Sprouse (ssprouse@wtamu.edu)
Modality: In person
Games and gamification are buzzwords in education and pedagogy. In addition to popular curricular games such as Reacting to the Past, many teachers are incorporating games, the idea of game-play, and the study of medieval texts as games and play into the classroom. This roundtable session seeks proposals that discuss ways in which we can use the appeal of games/game-play in the classroom to make medieval literature and culture more accessible to the digital generation.

Goliardic Society, Western Michigan Univ.

“Sed ad ludum properamus”: Leisure in the Middle Ages

Contact: Kylie L. Owens (kylie.l.owens@wmich.edu)
Modality: In person
Let the games begin! Because popular culture often paints a dull and dismal picture of the Middle Ages, we often do not get to learn of all the ways in which medieval people entertained themselves, less loose, and had fun. This session explores the role of leisure in the Middle Ages, as well as the implications (be they cultural, social, religious, political, etc.) of having a good time. This session invites papers on the role of leisure in the Middle Ages, and welcomes approaches from all disciplines, including history, literary studies, art history, and religious studies.

Medieval Voices: Tools for Listening to the Past

Contact: Annie N Spencer (medievalspencer@gmail.com)
Modality: In person
The medieval past has been misheard, misunderstood, or purposefully re-interpreted for bigoted, harmful ends. This session explores different ways that we can listen to the voices of the Middle Ages and respond to their stories. Much work has been done to hear the voices that have been underprivileged in history and scholarship, and this session hopes to highlight that work. This session welcomes any methodology, but will prioritize contributions regarding underprivileged voices from the Middle Ages (this includes critical race theory, queer theory, gender studies, disability studies). We invite contributions of any geographic region within the period of 500–1500 CE.

Great Lakes Adiban Society

Prosimetrum in Islamicate Literatures: Bridges, Representations, and Dialogues

Contact: Nathan L. M. Tabor (nathan.tabor@wmich.edu)
Modality: In person
The Great Lakes Adiban Society seeks papers that both unpack the interaction of prose and poetry and consider the broader uses of prosimetrum among single works, scribal traditions, and performative settings. To facilitate a broad engagement with Islamicate prosimetra from the pre-modern world, this panel has an interdisciplinary focus, seeking scholars with backgrounds in languages, literature, music, history, art, religions, and philosophy. By exploring these aspects of prosimetra as a form of conceptual bridge-building, we hope to generate a discussion that will help scholars approach the use of this textual form with newfound insight and appreciation.

See all sessions organized by Great Lakes Adiban Society

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Hagiography Society

Hagiographies as Relics: Medieval Vitae Rendered as Efficacious and Curative

Contact: Anna Harrison (annaharrison@lmu.edu)
Modality: In person
While a saint’s text does not commonly serve as their relic in medieval hagiographies, the rendering of the vita as efficacious is not uncommon. In texts like the Life of Margaret of Antioch, saints’ words were believed to channel the grace she had when she was living, even beyond her death. In the case of the Life of Ida of Leuven, reading the vita was believed to be a performance of salvation, one that could facilitate affective and bodily healing. The panel seeks to explore these and/or other medieval hagiographical texts that were believed to be efficacious and curative.

Saints and Their Day Jobs

Contact: Anna Harrison (annaharrison@lmu.edu)
Modality: In person
We invite submissions on the broad topic of Saints and Work. Bridget of Kildare did dairy work, Paul made tents, and Julian was a hospitaller whom some compare to Oedipus! Benedict enjoined his monks to work and pray. How did work function in medieval accounts of the saints’ lives? Did it add to their saintly portfolios or detract from them? What about it was worldly, and what led them to the other world? Related topics are welcome as well.

Teaching the Saints: “Autohagiography” (A Roundtable)

Contact: Anna Harrison (annaharrison@lmu.edu)
Modality: In person
This roundtable focuses on teaching autohagiography, an elastic category that might include Augustine’s Confessions, Angela of Foligno’s Memorial, Margery Kempe’s Book, for example, and which sometimes raise complex questions about authorship and audience. Teaching autohagiograpy presents challenges and opportunities that both overlap with and differ from other sorts of hagiographical writings. We welcome papers that consider difficulties that emerge in the teaching of such texts as well as illustrations of productive ways of reading autohagiography. We welcome broader considerations such as the value of teaching such texts in any discipline of the liberal arts curriculum.

The Two Faces of Illness: Suffering and Miraculous Healings by Holy Individuals

Contact: Anna Harrison (annaharrison@lmu.edu)
Modality: In person
Many saintly figures were afflicted by chronic and incurable illnesses, wounds, or disabilities that they endured within the paradigm of holy suffering. Many of them also performed miraculous healings while still alive. This session focuses on saintly figures from a range of religious traditions who combined these two faces of illness. How did they negotiate their own illnesses or disabilities in a life of service and devotion? Did their own illnesses condition the way they approached other sufferers and offer miraculous healings? How did others view their illnesses and how did they approach them in search of healing miracles?

Harvard Medieval Colloquium

Border-Crossings in the Medieval British Isles

Contact: Emily Sun (emilysun@g.harvard.edu)
Modality: In person
The panel welcomes work that addresses medieval border-crossings and border-crossers. What movements—of bodies, objects, cultures, communities—are depicted in the medieval British literary, documentary, and material record? How do such corpora move, migrate, and interact with one another, and what transformations do they undergo as they cross spaces and boundaries? Are such movements viewed as chiefly destructive and dislocative phenomena, or as giving rise to new formations, communities, and identities? What movements gave rise to the medieval texts we study today—and how can such texts cross into and inform our understanding of the movements and border-crossings of the present?

Haskins Society

Elite Women and Memory

Cosponsored by: Medieval People
Contact: Laura L Gathagan (laura.gathagan@cortland.edu)
Modality: In person
This session is co-sponsored by the Haskins Society and Medieval People. It invites papers that address elite women and memory, broadly conceived. Topics might include women’s interaction with memory through material objects, manuscripts, documentary culture, patronage, bequests, donations and inventories. Examinations of kin groups, dynastic networks and non-familial bonds are also encouraged. The session would ideally be both geographically and chronologically expansive, allowing for topics from early- to late-medieval periods and from the disciplines of history, literature, object studies and cultural studies. Papers with a global perspective are especially encouraged.

Medieval Documentary Cultures

Cosponsored by: Medieval Documentary Cultures
Contact: Laura L Gathagan (laura.gathagan@cortland.edu)
Modality: In person
This session invites papers on investigations of all aspects of documentary culture in the Middle Ages, including the commissioning, use and preservation of documents, whether manuscript, books or other types of documentary materials, by both secular and monastic entities. Possible topics include lay or ecclesiastical manuscript culture, rhetorical agency, manuscript and cartulary production and dissemination, the use of manuscripts and memory, including commissioning, production and dissemination of women’s secular and monastic writing. The session is also a natural fit for analysis of documentary artifacts as material sources: charters, letters, seals, iconography, illumination.

See all sessions organized by Haskins Society

Heroic Age: A Journal of Early Medieval Northwestern Europe

Global Contexts and Contacts in Early Medieval Northwestern Europe

Contact: Larry Swain (larry.swain@bemidjistate.edu)
Modality: In person
The “global turn” in medieval studies continues to gain momentum, particularly in late-medieval literary and historical studies featuring European contact with non-European nations; however, where it comes to Late Antiquity and the early medieval period, aside from examination of the influence and impact of the Roman Empire such studies have lagged. This session invites 20-minute papers dealing with any aspect of global context and contacts expressly between Northwestern Europe (Gaul/Francia, Britain, Early Medieval England, Ireland, the Low Countries, Scandinavia) and any other culture or part of the world.

New Approaches to Identity in Late Antiquity and Early Medieval Time Periods

Contact: Larry Swain (larry.swain@bemidjistate.edu)
Modality: In person
A period of upheaval in every sphere, Late Antiquity saw chieftains become kings, Germans imitate Romans, Romans imitate Germans, and different religious expressions—whether within Roman Christianity, traditional Roman religion, or the religions of those the Romans conquered. We seek 20-minute papers developing new avenues of investigating issues of identity (gender, sexuality, class, ethnogenesis, religious, culture, etc.) as expressed in Northwestern Europe (Gaul/Francia, Britain, Early Medieval England, Ireland, the Low Countries, Scandinavia, etc.) during Late Antiquity (for our purposes here, 284 CE to 800 CE) as expressed through humanly created media (art, literature, language, material culture, political and social structures).

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Ibero-Medieval Association of North America (IMANA)

Imaginative Iberia: Creativity, Culture, and the Medieval(ist) Mind

Contact: Matthew V. Desing (mvdesing2@utep.edu)
Modality: In person
The evidence of creativity among the “Three Cultures” of medieval Iberia (Christians, Jews, and Muslims) is abundant. Shifts in current understandings of the cognitive processes of creativity have also transformed our modern perceptions of the various medieval imaginaries. This panel seeks examinations of creativity as a concept in its various forms (literary, artistic, religious, legal, etc.) as well as the evolution of the ways medievalists have understood and studied imaginative phenomena in their medieval Iberian manifestations.

The Joy of Life: A Session in Memory of Ellen Friedrich

Contact: Connie L. Scarborough (connie.scarborough@ttu.edu)
Modality: In person
The papers in this session will reflect Ellen's joy for life as they examine the celebration of life's pleasures—spiritual and physical—in literary works from medieval Iberia and France.

Money Moves: The Economy, the Fisc, and Medieval Iberian Cultural Production

Cosponsored by: Association for Spanish and Portuguese Historical Studies
Contact: Raul Alvarez Moreno (raul.alvarez-moreno@ubc.ca)
Modality: In person
From the end of the eleventh through the sixteenth centuries, commerce, monetarization, taxation, and economic thinking significantly influenced European cultural and literary production, conditioning many social and cultural dynamics. These ideas apply to Medieval Iberia, we need important conversations deploying the explanatory value of economy and the fisc in historical and literary studies, considering them essential rather than curiosity or context. Proposals may include but are not limited to categories such as taxation, money, market, wealth, labor, property, consumption; representations of the economy and money; economic characters (tax-collectors, usurers, merchants); debates and conflicts (levies, usury, debasement of currency), etc.

Neomedieval Modernity: The Presence of the Middle Ages Today

Contact: Alvaro Garrote-Pascual (agarrotepascua@wm.edu)
Modality: In person
The allusions to the Islamic presence in the Iberian Peninsula during the Middle Ages made by far-right politicians and conservative political commentators, the claims for alternative regional and national identities within today’s Spain grounded on a medieval past, or the increasing presence of iconic figures such as El Cid in series and novels are just a few examples of the incidence of the Iberian Middle Ages in the public sphere.This panel welcomes papers that discuss and analyze the uses and misuses of the Middle Ages for modern day purposes through an array of different media.

See all sessions organized by Ibero-Medieval Association of North America (IMANA)

Index of Medieval Art

In Honor of Alison Stones I: Gothic Manuscripts

Cosponsored by: International Arthurian Society, North American Branch (IAS/NAB)
Contact: Kathy M. Krause (krausek@umkc.edu)
Modality: In person
This paper panel seeks to bring together scholars whose work has been influenced by Alison Stones’s scholarship on medieval manuscripts and their illuminations. Papers might include discussions of Arthurian manuscripts, the Miracles of Gautier de Coinci, or manuscripts associated with the cult of Saint James and the pilgrimage to Compostela, as well as broader issues of artistic attribution, the “Gothic style” of illumination, digital humanities, etc. The panel will seek to offer insight into the influence of Stones’s wide-ranging scholarship on medieval manuscripts over the last several decades. See also "In Honor of Alison Stones II: Interdisciplinary Illumination (A Roundtable)," cosponsored by the International Arthurian Society, North American Branch and the Index of Medieval Art.

Institute for Medieval Studies, Univ. of New Mexico

Assertive Medieval Women Across the Globe I

Contact: Anita Obermeier
Modality: In person
Assertive medieval women transgress their patriarchally assigned positions of immanence, often with the pen, the sword, and through sex. In an attempt to break new ground, we seek contributions that explore assertive medieval women—both historical and fictional—from global perspectives. Comparative perspectives that trace similar experiences are highly encouraged. Reading the Middle Ages from a broader vantage point that illustrates how women worldwide were facing comparable experiences and challenges helps us understand the Middle Ages and feminism through a new lens.

See all sessions organized by Institute for Medieval Studies, Univ. of New Mexico

International Arthurian Society (IAS), Swiss Branch

Neglected Sidekicks in French Arthurian Prose Romances

Contact: Marco Veneziale (marco.veneziale@uzh.ch)
Modality: In person
Recent studies allow modern readers to further discover late Arthurian prose romances such as Guiron, Prophecies de Merlin, or Suite-Merlin. These late romances contain a vast compilation of episodes narrating different adventures of the main characters. But who are their companions? The goal of this session is to shed light on the unknown heroes who, in the narrative structure of these late romances, play an important role in their respective episodes rather than in the compilation as a whole. We aim to provide thematic studies of one or more sidekicks appearing in late Arthurian romances. All methodological approaches are welcome.

International Arthurian Society, North American Branch (IAS/NAB)

Arthurian Generation

Contact: Robyn L. Thum-O'Brien
Modality: In person
This panel invites explorations of the various ways in which the Arthurian tradition can be read as “generative,” from narrative generation to generative bodies to generations of Arthurian readers and writers. Speakers are encouraged to use the catalyst of Arthur and Arthuriana to think broadly about the affordances of this “once and future” King.

Revisiting a Racialized Camelot: Lesser Known “Knights of Color” and Addressing Lacunas in Our Approaches (A Roundtable)

Contact: Tirumular Narayanan
Modality: In person
While a great deal has been written about Palamedes, Morien, and Feirefiz, this session would be interested in thinking about less-discussed knights hailing from non-Latin Christian polities as well as approaches beyond literary studies (ranging the medieval to medievalism). This session would be especially interested in: Arthurian enemies, lacunas in approaches like art history & philological studies, the presence of Arthurian narratives in non-Latin Christian contexts, teaching experiences around “Race in Arthuriana,” and the roles “Knights of Color” play in medievalism when imagining a post-racial Camelot without having a post-racial present.

Solitude and Loneliness in Arthurian Texts

Contact: Usha Vishnuvajjala
Modality: In person
Although much scholarship has focused on communities and social bonds in Arthurian texts, most studies that consider characters acting alone focus on their goals or activities or their surroundings. This session would consider how Arthurian texts depict loneliness and its counterpart solitude. How do Arthurian texts depict being alone as something to be desired or something to be avoided, beyond solitude's usefulness for prayer or knightly achievement or appreciating nature? How do they depict loneliness and isolation, beyond as a temporary condition to be overcome?

See all sessions organized by International Arthurian Society, North American Branch (IAS/NAB)

International Boethius Society

Boethius's De consolatione philosophiae in the Middle Ages

Contact: Philip Edward Phillips (philip.phillips@mtsu.edu)
Modality: In person
The De consolatione philosophiae of Boethius is widely acknowledged by scholars as one of the most widely read and most frequently translated works of the early Middle Ages. Boethian concepts such as Fortune's Wheel, the Highest Good, and the Eternal Present inform and enrich the works of later writers and thinkers across the widest range of vernacular language traditions. This session seeks to feature speakers who will examine the translation, adaptation, and influence of Boethius's most famous work.

International Center of Medieval Art (ICMA)

The Visual and Literary Legacy of Hrabanus Maurus: Interdisciplinary Examinations

Contact: Kelin Michael (kelin.tesia.michael@emory.edu)
Modality: In person
A 2018 exhibition at the Bibliothèque nationale de France paired images from Hrabanus Maurus's publications with modern and contemporary pieces to create a visual dialogue. This relationship is often understudied, but Hrabanus's work, in particular, offers an opportunity to examine the longevity, applicability, and adaptability of medieval material across time and space. We invite proposals from various disciplines, including literary studies, art history, history, public humanities, and digital humanities, to build a picture of the current state of research into the relationship between word and image, both within Hrabanus's work itself and in current scholarly projects that respond to him.

See all sessions organized by International Center of Medieval Art (ICMA)

International Center of Medieval Art (ICMA) Student Committee

Contested Boundaries: Blurring the Sacred and the Secular in Late Medieval Visual Culture

Cosponsored by: International Center of Medieval Art (ICMA)
Contact: Shannah Rose (smr690@nyu.edu)
Modality: In person
This session seeks papers that investigate how late medieval visual culture blurs the border between the sacred and the secular throughout the late medieval global world (ca. 1250–1500). During this period, the creation of and haptic engagement with sacred and secular architectural spaces and objects in various media operated in a state of flux. Such variability and fluidity were dependent on the socio-political context of the production, circulation, and reception of such objects and spaces, and were critically shaped by contemporary ontological and hermeneutic questions of their very nature and interpretation.

International Courtly Literature Society (ICLS), North American Branch

Chrétien de Troyes Revisited

Contact: Susanne Hafner (hafner@fordham.edu)
Modality: In person
Chrétien de Troyes is arguably the most important author of courtly literature and hence central to the International Courtly Literature Society's mission. The last decades, however, have been moving from the canon to previously neglected authors. The last years in particular have expanded the definition of medieval—and courtly—literature to be even more inclusive. Now the time has come to assess what this means for the foundational figure of a genre which is by definition elitist, aristocratic, Christian and Central European. This session will bring current research together with the courtly canon and its most prominent author.

Piety and Religion in the Court

Contact: Shawn Phillip Cooper
Modality: In person
Religious belief, even when not reflected in active practise, has a significant impact on social, political, and cultural values. Although medieval religious belief may share many dogmatic similarities to present religious belief, the medieval worldview exists on the opposite side of a seemingly unbridgeable conceptual divide from the present. This panel solicits papers that will help to navigate that gap in order better to understand how medieval peoples believed and how those beliefs may continue to shape the present. Abstracts of no more than 250 words should address piety and religious belief in courtly literature or courtly society.

See all sessions organized by International Courtly Literature Society (ICLS), North American Branch

International Courtly Literature Society (ICLS), Swiss Branch

Clothes Make the (Wo)man: Image, Fashion, and Identification in Old French Texts

Cosponsored by: Univ. Zürich
Contact: Claudia Tassone (claudia.tassone@uzh.ch)
Modality: In person
Descriptions of men’s and women’s clothing are not especially common in medieval French narrative texts, despite particular attention, in some literary genres, to short but significant physical portrayals. When descriptions of personal attire are present, they are codified. This, in turn, reflects the codification of fashion in society, which is well represented, for example, in didactical literature, but which can also be observed in medieval renderings of Classical texts. This session aims to study some characteristics of this theme, with regard to different aspects of medieval French literary production.

International Machaut Society

Mapping Machaut

Contact: Tamsyn Mahoney-Steel
Modality: In person
For this session we invite proposals that explore aspects of place, location and mapping in relation to Guillaume de Machaut, his milieu and studies about him. Recognizing the growing interest in spatial humanities, contributions could focus on the geographic pinpointing of fourteenth-century artists and patrons or the exploration of the itinerant careers of poets and composers. Analyses of literary depictions of place, movement and relocation are also welcome, as well as approaches that consider the provenance and movement of manuscripts or more abstract considerations such as the relocation of Machaut and his contemporaries within modern scholarly contexts.

Minding the Gaps: Distance, Absence, Silence, and Potential

Contact: Tamsyn Mahoney-Steel
Modality: In person
What value lies in the void? This session delves into the spaces, pauses, and absences present in later medieval experience, to assess the idea of ‘the gap’ and its potentialities across a variety of contexts and media. Distance and absence long structured human–divine relations, but other gaps emerging in musical, literary, or material initiatives (13th–15th centuries) could facilitate and/or complicate, through association with liminal genres; secular subjects and sites; formal, sensory or technological experimentation; untexted or marginalized voices. Open to various approaches, we welcome contributions that explore what is missing and why, and that consider implications for current interdisciplinary inquiry.

Phenomenology of Performance (A Roundtable)

Contact: Tamsyn Mahoney-Steel
Modality: In person
We invite proposals for roundtable contributions that explore or portray the experience of performing medieval music, theater or poetry. Contributors can investigate performance archaeology, questioning medieval practices, instruments and venues; or focus on modern techniques and evolving styles. This can be directly or indirectly related to Machaut and his milieu. Rather than offer analysis on the experience of performance attendees or the reception of works, we encourage participants to investigate or exemplify the lived or embodied experience of performance and performers. We welcome presentation media including but not limited to speech, live or recorded sound, video, sign language, and dance.

International Marie de France Society

Multidisciplinary Marie de France

Contact: Tamara Bentley Caudill (tcaudill@ju.edu)
Modality: In person
This paper panel highlights the multidisciplinarity of Marie's works. Papers may address any of the known works by Marie de France (the Lais, the Fables, the Espurgatoire seint Patriz, and/or La Vie Seinte Audree) or her imitators and draw connections with various trends in contemporary scholarship. Our objective is to provide a space for Marie de France scholars to come together (rather than being scattered across thematic panels at the Congress) and to stimulate discussion regarding the ways that Marie can be incorporated into articles or monographs dealing with issues beyond Romance Studies.

See all sessions organized by International Marie de France Society

International Medieval Sermon Studies Society

The Bible, Sacred Texts, and Preaching

Cosponsored by: Society for the Study of the Bible in the Middle Ages (SSBMA)
Contact: Jessalynn L. Bird (jbird@saintmarys.edu)
Modality: In person
The importance of commentaries for the exegesis of the scriptures in preaching has traditionally been neglected both in the fields of sermon studies and exegetical studies. This session will investigate how preachers performed the all-important task of communicating the interpretation of holy scriptures to a wide range of audiences and in a variety of contexts. Proposals for papers on patristic, medieval, and early modern preachers from a variety of cultures and faiths are encouraged.

Medieval Sermon Studies II–III

Contact: Jessalynn L. Bird (jbird@saintmarys.edu)
Modality: In person
The study of sermons and associated texts continues to grow. Sermons are now incorporated even into interdisciplinary studies and are mined for evidence of social and intellectual attitudes, liturgical and spiritual life. Much, however, remains to be discovered. These sessions encourage scholars to submit papers on both innovative and/or traditional approaches to sermon studies. These sessions will be in person.

See all sessions organized by International Medieval Sermon Studies Society

International Sidney Society

Sidney at Kalamazoo I–II

Contact: Joel B. Davis (jbdavis@stetson.edu)
Modality: In person
The International Sidney Society invites papers on any and all topics related to Philip Sidney, Mary Sidney Herbert, Lady Mary Wroth, the Sidney family or their extensive British and Continental network, inclluding Fulke Greville, Samuel Daniel, William Herbert, Alberico Gentili, Veronica Franco, Vittoria Colonna, George Buchanan, Philippe Duplessis-Mornay, Étienne de La Boétie, Giordano Bruno, Justus Lipsius, and others. We encourage submissions by newcomers, including graduate students, and by established scholars of all ranks.

Sidney at Kalamazoo III: The Van Dorsten Lecture

Contact: Joel B. Davis (jbdavis@stetson.edu)
Modality: In person
Roland Greene (Mark Pigott KBE Professor Anthony P. Meier Family Professor of the Humanities, Stanford University) offers a lecture of Sidney's two Arcadias and the Global Baroque.

International Society for the Study of Early Medieval England

New Voices on Early Medieval England II

Contact: Chelsea Shields-Más
Modality: In person
Since 2003, the “New Voices on Early Medieval England” sessions at Kalamazoo (formerly “New Voices in Anglo-Saxon Studies”) have been an ongoing and successful tradition for scholars of early English literature, history, and culture attending the annual conference. New and emerging scholars in studies on early medieval England working in any discipline are invited to submit proposals for consideration.

See all sessions organized by International Society for the Study of Early Medieval England

Italian Art Society

Unfolding the Past: The Materiality and Temporality of Medieval Southern Italy I–II

Contact: Antonino Tranchina
Modality: In person
Since Antiquity, Southern Italy has been hosting civilizations committed to thorough preservation of the material legacy of the past. During the Middle Ages, the splitting in separated cultural entities prompted competition in the reclamation of such a legacy. These sessions aims at collecting study-cases of re-temporalized past in medieval Southern Italy, focusing on the material evidence of conceptualizations of time embodied by architecture and other works of art (e.g. the use of spolia, objects, relics and traces from different strata of time) exemplifying the practice of folding and unfolding time in the political and social reality of Medieval cultures.

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Italians and Italianists at Kalamazoo

Center and Periphery in Late Medieval Italian Literature

Contact: Vincenzo Dimaggio (vdimagg@iu.edu)
Modality: In person
Since the Middle Ages, Italy has not enjoyed a robust and unquestioned central authority (be it political, literary, or linguistic) that could assert its dominance and take on the role of a model for more peripheral entities. This has led to the development of a distinctly polycentric cultural landscape in which different "centers" (or wanna-be centers) compete with each other, each in relation to its own peripheries. How does this affect the depiction of the city and the countryside? How do prestigious and more marginal languages interact? How do different political entities compete for the literary landscape?

Petrarch and Petrarchan Landscapes: Exemplarity, Intertextuality, and the Natural World

Contact: Alani Hicks-Bartlett (alani_hicks-bartlett@brown.edu)
Modality: In person
This panel considers Petrarch and Petrarchan landscapes—that is, the toponyms, cartographies, and geographies charted in and through Petrarch’s oeuvre, broadly understood. From his detailed figuration of Vaucluse to elaborate chartings of the Tiber, Arno, and Po; from comparisons of "foreign" soil to descriptions of olive trees and the hills and springs near Capranica; and from classical loci to troubadouric commonplaces, Petrarch gives great attention to the natural environment in all of his work. As Petrarch’s representation of the natural world often has intertextual or exemplary dimensions, we invite papers addressing Petrarchan "imitators," and Petrarch’s own literary borrowings.

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John Gower Society

Gower in the Early Modern

Contact: Brian W. Gastle (bgastle@wcu.edu)
Modality: In person
Though John Gower died in 1408, he remained a formidable literary presence throughout the early modern period. In many ways Gower undermines the walls of periodization erected by later scholars. This session asks medieval and early modern scholars to consider how Gower endured into and influenced the early modern, especially as English poetry and English looked back to the Ricardian period for continuity and difference, and to consider the problems of periodization with Gower generally.

Gower in Uncertain Times

Contact: Brian W. Gastle (bgastle@wcu.edu)
Modality: In person
During his lifetime, John Gower witnessed popular rebellion, climate and regime change, erosion of trust in institutions, social unrest, and a global pandemic. This session invites panelists to consider John Gower as a poet of uncertain times. Where in Gower's multilingual oeuvre can we identify intersections of instability, flux, change, transformation, and chaos? What significance might these moments of uncertainty hold for audiences both medieval and modern? How do Gower and his audience express and respond to existential uncertainty through art? Finally, what does it mean to read John Gower in our own uncertain times?

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La corónica: A Journal of Medieval Hispanic Languages, Literatures, and Cultures

Chronicling Defeat in Medieval Iberian Chronicles

Contact: Montserrat Piera (mpiera01@temple.edu)
Modality: In person
Military propaganda in medieval chronicles served as a tool either to justify one’s claims and acts or to bolster up social and political status and auctoritas. Victories in battle were aggrandized for a variety of political and religious reasons. But how did medieval chroniclers narrate and visualize military defeats? What rhetorical and affective strategies were employed to describe and to visually represent instances of defeat? How did they materially embody the ensuing trauma? This session will aim at answering these questions by exploring cultural practices that textually and visually document the trauma of defeat in Medieval Iberian chronicles.

See all sessions organized by La corónica: A Journal of Medieval Hispanic Languages, Literatures, and Cultures

Liturgica Poloniae

Challenges in Cataloging Medieval Manuscripts Today: Liturgical Case Studies (A Roundtable)

Cosponsored by: PSALM-Network (Politics, Society and Liturgy in the Middle Ages)
Contact: Paweł Figurski (pawel.figurski.uw@gmail.com)
Modality: In person
In the digital era of today, alongside traditional problems of cataloging liturgical manuscripts, new challenges arise due to the perplexity of technologies available to manuscript catalogers (TEI, MEI, etc). This roundtable seeks to identify the crucial challenges of preparing a highly detailed but also accessible description of a liturgical manuscript. Furthermore, the roundtable serves to share experiences received during the realization of the project “Liturgica Poloniae” whose goal is to publish the catalog of medieval liturgical manuscripts preserved in Poland. The meeting will enable the audience to discuss various approaches to cataloging liturgical codices and fragments.

Lydgate Society

The Problem of Presentation: Fifteenth-Century Texts and the Virtual Facsimile

Contact: Matthew Evan Davis (matthew@matthewedavis.net)
Modality: In person
There is a popular tendency to approach written works, art, and other cultural products online as “content.” For material objects of the fifteenth century this presents a problem of presentation. When virtually presented, the contexts of these objects are often not fully considered, encouraging the perpetuation of stereotypes about authors, artists, and scribes because the divided text is then re-contextualized to fit more modern notions of the medieval rather than those of the times it was written within. The Lydgate Society invites papers on any aspect of this problem as it relates to manuscripts and authors of the fifteenth century.

See all sessions organized by Lydgate Society

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Magistra: A Journal of Women's Spirituality in History

Love of Learning, Desire for God: Genre and Voice in Medieval European Theologies

Contact: Judith Sutera (jsutera@mountosb.org)
Modality: In person
The session proposes using a particular “grid” to analyze and compare theological writings. On one axis are the styles imaginative, conversational and argumentative and on the other genres of monastic, scholastic and vernacular. The works of theological masters such as Hildegard, Gerturd and Bernard could be explored using these categories to examine the style of each.

More than Just Your Average Nun: Lifestyles of Religious Women

Cosponsored by: Center for Cistercian and Monastic Studies, Western Michigan Univ.
Contact: Judith Sutera (jsutera@mountosb.org)
Modality: In person
While some may think only of traditional monastic life when they think of medieval religious women, there were a variety of lifestyle options which will be explored in this session. Papers will identify, compare or otherwise elucidate the rules, practices and distinctions among them or discuss those who influenced them.

Mary Jaharis Center for Byzantine Art and Culture

Audience and Action in Byzantine Ceremonies

Contact: Erik Ellis (ezdellis@gmail.com)
Modality: In person
Processions celebrating feasts and festivals abounded in Byzantium. These were public events, traversing city-streets and making claims on civic space. The descriptions and instructions for these processions concentrate largely on the top of the social hierarchy involved and consequently their proper order was a major concern. However, these were public events whose success depended on their ability to move the citizenry. Yet the crowd’s place in public ceremonies remains understudied. This panel attempts to recover Byzantine audience experience through the exploration of textual, topographical, and visual evidence.

Material Collective

Ecological Seeing I: Teaching Environmental Art History (A Roundtable)

Contact: Nancy Thebaut (nthebaut@skidmore.edu)
Modality: In person
The ongoing environmental crisis facing our planet calls for action in every field. As teachers, medieval art historians can help their students make sense of the situation by exploring the ways people conceived of, saw, and interacted with the natural world in the Middle Ages. For this roundtable, we invite participants to discuss their experiences building courses or individual class sessions around ecological topics, focusing on both challenges and successful strategies for helping students work with the material.

Ecological Seeing II: New Research in Environmental Art History

Contact: Benjamin C Tilghman (btilghman2@washcoll.edu)
Modality: In person
The ongoing environmental crisis facing our planet calls for action in every field. Medieval art historians can help make sense of the situation by exploring the ways people conceived of, saw, and interacted with the natural world in the Middle Ages. Yet there are still relatively few scholarly studies that take an ecocritical approach to medieval art, despite the expansion of the approach in other subfields of art history. We invite papers on any topic within medieval art that will help the field work towards a richer body of literature on the environmental art history of the Middle Ages.

Medica: The Society for the Study of Healing in the Middle Ages

Medical Recipes and Household Science in Medieval and Early Modern Europe

Contact: Nichola E. Harris (harrisn@sunyulster.edu)
Modality: In person
This panel explores the formulation and circulation of medical recipes and the practice of household science in medieval and early modern Europe. Papers will investigate the intellectual, cultural, and social forces that lead to the development and use of household recipes as well as the methods by which such medical formulations circulated within social networks. Attention will be given to discussing current research on the chemical science behind such medical recipes, such as new experiments focused on recreating their physical composition and testing formulations derived from ingredients and procedures described in medieval and early modern texts.

See all sessions organized by Medica: The Society for the Study of Healing in the Middle Ages

Medieval and Renaissance Drama Society (MRDS)

Reexamining the Audience(s) of Early Drama and Festive Performance

Contact: Carolyn Coulson (ccoulson2@su.edu)
Modality: In person
Historical audiences are difficult to locate and situate. Perhaps because of this, scholars of early performance have accepted the idea that most spectators of (usually religious) drama and festivals shared beliefs, cultures, languages, and ethnic identities. This panel seeks to bring an inclusive approach to the audiences of early performance, illuminating diversity and difference in race, ethnicity, religion, gender, disability, sexual orientation, etc.

Reflecting on Performance Past and Present: Players, Playing, and Ensembles: A Session in Honor of Clifford Davidson

Contact: Lofton L. Durham (lofton.durham@wmich.edu)
Modality: In person
The Medieval and Renaissance Drama society invites proposals for this session honoring Clifford Davidson, professor emeritus of English and Medieval Studies at WMU, who has been a driving force at the ICMS for the last fifty years producing and curating a wide range of diverse and engaging performances of medieval material. To celebrate this legacy (represented recently by the Mostly Medieval Theatre Festival in '17, '19, and in a different form for '23), we invite papers focused on the players, the creation of playing environments, the methods of playing, and the building of ensembles in both past and present performances.

See all sessions organized by Medieval and Renaissance Drama Society (MRDS)

Medieval Association for Rural Studies (MARS)

“Silk Road(s)”: Environmental and Economic History of “Medieval” Central Asia

Contact: Philip Slavin
Modality: In person
Medieval Association for Rural Studies (MARS) organises a session entitled ‘Silk Road(s)’: Environmental and Economic History of ‘Medieval’ Central Asia and invites interested participants to submit paper proposal abstracts. The session takes a strongly multi-disciplinary approach, and as such, it will focus on research, whose sources, methods and findings are situated across several related disciplines, including (but not limited to) history, archaeology, palaeogenetics and palaeoclimatology. Although an old field, the history of ‘Silk Road(s)’ still suffers from old misconceptions and mis-constructs begging for a scholarly revision—an idea standing at the heart of the proposed session.

Plague Studies: New Sources, Methods, and Approaches

Contact: Philip Slavin
Modality: In person
Medieval Association for Rural Studies (MARS) organises a session entitled ‘Plague Studies: New Sources, Methods and Approaches’ and invites interested participants to submit paper proposal abstracts. The session takes a strongly multi-disciplinary approach, and as such, it will focus on research, whose sources, methods and findings are situated across several related disciplines, including (but not limited to) history, archaeology, palaeogenetics and palaeoclimatology. Plague studies is a fast changing field, in which both humanists and scientists are developing a consilient dialogue and collaboration, which the MARS session hopes to reflect.

Medieval Association of the Midwest (MAM)

Second Helping: Reading between the Lines of Celebration and Heartbreak in Chaucer's Feasts

Contact: Stephen Yandell
Modality: In person
Chaucer focuses on the Prioress's feasting, causing us to note that her inability to understand how others would see her, paired with her desire for respect, tell us much about how power was understood and acquired. This session invites scholars to explore Chaucer's deliberate pairings of feasting and celebration with characters who are exposed by key moments in their prologues and tales. The Prioress's genuine emotion for animals over innocent people says much about the preoccupations of her “kind.” Papers will explore what Chaucer might have intended by the Prioress’s and others’ varied exposures in these food settings.

Teaching the Medieval in the Midwest

Contact: Stephen Yandell
Modality: In person
This session seeks papers that explore the particular challenges and opportunities that arise when teaching medieval topics in Midwestern classrooms. We are particularly interested in work from graduate students who have navigated medieval teaching experiences in the Midwest at the university level, but we are also interested in individuals speaking about community outreach and other educational experiences. Speakers may also address resources particularly accessible to Midwest classrooms as well as classroom trends that seem dissimilar to those on the U.S. coasts. We seek papers exploring pedagogical practices, course development, student engagement, assignment creation, interdisciplinary education, and public outreach.

Vikings and Medieval Violence in the Modern Mind

Contact: Stephen Yandell
Modality: In person
While some pop-cultural images of Vikings—a sense of adventure, a disregard for authority, and a kind of reckless courage—may be deemed innocuous or even admirable, other modern appropriations of (often erroneously labeled) ‘Viking’ identities by extremist mentalities pose a threat to peace and civil society. This session invites scholars to consider any of three aspects of the problem: (1) the history of the romanticization of Vikings and medieval violence, (2) the differences between medieval and modern cultural memories of the Vikings, and (3) ways that medievalists as public intellectuals ought to represent and respond to Vikings and medieval violence.

Wanted Dead and Alive: Schrödinger’s Cat and the Middle Ages

Contact: Stephen Yandell
Modality: In person
The concept of Schrödinger’s Cat inspires new lenses for examining the Middle Ages: what appears simultaneously alive and dead in medieval scholarship today? Where does one find life and death intersecting in and across medieval fields? This session invites panelists to explore ways that conceptions of death and understandings of what it means to live interweave in every aspect of medieval life. This includes looking at saints, monastic culture, and the power of relics. It also encourages exploration of the ways that medieval scholars breathe new life into their fields, employing modern theories of translation and contemporary medievalism, for example.

Medieval Ecocriticisms

Medieval Ecocriticisms I: Gender and Sexuality

Contact: Heide Estes (heide.estes@gmail.com)
Modality: In person
This session seeks papers on gender and global medieval ecocriticisms, including queer, trans, and ecofeminist readings, which map and/or reconfigure our social, cultural, and physical, human, and non-human environments. What can dialogue across these intersections of medieval and modern temporal and spatial ecologies teach us and how can we think anew with them? We seek proposals from graduate students and early career as well as more established researchers working in archaeology, art history, economic and environmental history, music, religious studies and various medieval literatures.

Medieval Ecocriticisms II: Animals

Contact: Heide Estes (heide.estes@gmail.com)
Modality: In person
This session seeks papers on animals in global medieval studies with possible engagement with critical animal studies. What kinds of institutional and verbal structures influence the interactions among humans and animals? What makes a wild animal or a domesticated animal, possible? How does human difference affect human-animal relationships? We seek proposals from graduate students and early career as well as more established researchers working in archaeology, art history, critical animal studies, economic and environmental history,music, religious studies and various medieval literatures.

See all sessions organized by Medieval Ecocriticisms

Medieval Foremothers Society

In Honor of Bonnie Wheeler I: Women in/and Authority in Medieval Literature and Culture

Contact: Amy N. Vines (anvines@uncg.edu)
Modality: In person
This paper panel is one of two sessions honoring Bonnie Wheeler for her substantial contributions to and impact on the field of medieval studies generally, and feminist medieval studies specifically. We seek 15—20 minute papers on matters related to any of Dr. Wheeler's primary research subjects: the Arthurian legend, Chaucer, medieval romance, gender studies generally, and women writers, scholars, teachers, and leaders.

See all sessions organized by Medieval Foremothers Society

Medieval Romance Society

The Networks of Romance I: Transnational and Global

Contact: Rachel Ann Harley (rah600@york.ac.uk)
Modality: In person
Increased social mobility and technological advances in modern society, as well as the advent of postcolonial studies, have spurred scholars to investigate the ‘interconnectedness’ of the global Middle Ages, and to challenge Western-centrism. This session is open to papers that apply these critical approaches to romance texts. We welcome scholars who consider the textual representations of cross-culturalism, and of networks that transcend regional and national boundaries. Also invited are papers that examine depictions of networks from outside the medieval West. We particularly encourage participants who use decolonizing methodologies. Proposals should be 250 words for a 20-minute paper.

The Networks of Romance III: Intersectionality, Instability, and Social Networks

Contact: Rachel Ann Harley (rah600@york.ac.uk)
Modality: In person
A growing body of research by medievalists examines the intersectionality of identities, experiences, and relationships. However, it also tends to overlook the instability of overlapping social categories. This session challenges the assumption that intersecting identities, experiences, and relationships in the Middle Ages were static. It does so through interrogating the multiple and complex features of social networks in romance, whether that be on a micro or macro level. Topics could include but are not limited to the family, religious orders, local communities, and civic institutions. Proposals should be 250 words for a 20-minute paper.

See all sessions organized by Medieval Romance Society

Medieval Speech Act Society

Speech Acts and Social Status

Contact: Eric Shane Bryan (bryane@mst.edu)
Modality: In person
This session will examine discourses that influence—or are influenced by—the social status of discourse participants. Pragmatics and speech act theory recognize that the intended meaning of an utterance (illocution) must be understood as a function of the relationship between what is said (locution) and the cultural and speech-situational context in which a discourse occurs. Social status is a fundamental part of speech-situational context and must be acknowledged as contributing to the illocution of an utterance. A complete understanding of discourse in medieval texts must therefore account for social status. Papers may address texts from anywhere in the global medieval world.

Medieval Studies Program, Yale Univ.

Birthing in Mind and Memory I–II

Contact: Megan Renz Perry (megan.perry@yale.edu)
Modality: In person
To allude to the provocative title of Rebecca Dekker’s book Babies Are Not Pizzas, were medieval babies born (actively) or delivered (passively)? To what extent was birthing understood as within the authority of the mother versus that of the birth attendant(s)? We invite to this conversation papers that consider the various modes of action and passion in the birthing spaces of the medieval world. At another register, we welcome proposals that consider how the memory—traumatic, empowering, or otherwise transformative—of a birth or a stillbirth might complicate the medieval parent’s subsequent experience of authority or agency.

Digital Tools for Environmental Questions

Contact: Camila Marcone (camila.marcone@yale.edu)
Modality: In person
This panel invites contributors to present projects integrating the digital humanities with medieval environmental history research. How are digital tools such as GIS, databases, virtual re-creation, and AI expanding our understanding of human-nature relationships in the Middle Ages? How are medievalists using these tools to explore datasets from the period? What are the implications for present-day questions such as periodization and climate crisis? Some topics may include modeling, mapping, preservation, the digital humanities in environmental archaeology, and using digitized archives to characterize human-environment interactions. We invite contributions from scholars of all geographic regions working on environmental topics between 500–1500 C.E.

Medieval Textual Criticism: Theory and Practice

Contact: Carson J. Koepke (carson.koepke@yale.edu)
Modality: In person
Over 300 years ago, the British textual scholar Richard Bentley asserted his preference for the power of human reason over the readings of a hundred manuscripts. While the art of textual criticism has advanced considerably in the intervening centuries through the development of systematic methodologies such as Lachmannian stemmatics, consensus on the ideal editorial theory for medieval texts remains elusive. We seek to gather scholars interested in interrogating past and current theories of textual criticism and evaluating their application to the editing of medieval texts—especially (but not limited to) the notoriously complex textual traditions found in hagiography and vernacular romance.

Medieval–Renaissance Faculty Workshop, Univ. of Louisville

Archbishop Wulfstan of York, 1023⁠–2023

Contact: Andrew Rabin
Modality: In person
We are eager to receive submissions representing a variety of perspectives, methodologies, and disciplines. Speakers are invited to explore, not only Wulfstan’s writings themselves, but also his relationship with the kings he served, his received knowledge of both cross-channel and insular traditions of political thought, and the extent to which his work echoes or differs from that of his contemporaries. It is hoped that the session will serve as an opportunity to consider how Wulfstan’s writings contribute to our understanding of legal authority, ecclesiastical culture, and the complexities of English identity in an age of upheaval.

Law and Legal Culture in Early Medieval Britain I–II

Contact: Andrew Rabin
Modality: In person
We invite papers that examine the many ways in which law was made, understood, practiced, promulgated, and transcribed in early medieval Britain. We are eager to receive submissions representing a variety of perspectives, methodologies, and disciplines. Possible topics include (but are not limited to): royal legislation, legal manuscripts, law in/and literature, legal procedure, charters and diplomatics, writs and wills, dispute resolution, theories of law and justice, perceptions of early law in later periods, law in/and art. We welcome traditional philological and historicist approaches, as well as those informed by modern critical theory.

Monsters: The Experimental Association for the Research of Cryptozoology through Scholarly Theory and Practical Application (MEARCSTAPA)

Insular Monstrosities

Contact: Asa Simon Mittman (asmittman@csuchico.edu)
Modality: In person
This session considers various definitions of “insular” as they affect constructions of monstrosity. “Insularity”—bodies of land surrounded and connected by water, but also peoples and places perceived as cut off from larger communities of contact—bridges ideas, texts, artifacts, and concepts across our watery globe. Papers can think geographically and spatially, broadening the purview of the monstrous globally, including, for example, the monstrosity of the anthropocene and “New Thalassology.” Papers will emphasize the insular monster and the monstrosity of islands. We invite interdisciplinary and cross-cultural approaches that address the insularity of monsters, and the monstrousness of insularity.

Musicology at Kalamazoo

Authors, Performers, and Audiences in the Middle Ages

Contact: Rebecca Maloy (rebecca.maloy@colorado.edu)
Modality: In person
This session invites contributions that problematize the idea of composition as a fixed, authoritative act and explore a more fluid relationship among the agents of music making. Medieval music repertories are pervasively anonymous. Contrary to today’s focus on composers and the individual, medieval performers interacted with authors to modify and re-create compositions, both in writing and in performance. The audience could be involved in this process through participation in dancing and singing. We invite papers that explore issues of attribution, performance, reworking, multiple versions and reception of any musical genre in the Middle Ages.

Chant and Liturgy

Contact: Rebecca Maloy (rebecca.maloy@colorado.edu)
Modality: In person
The session focuses on monophonic chant in its liturgical context, with a broad geographical and chronological scope ranging from the early Middle Ages to the Renaissance (and beyond). While we expect papers to be primarily focused on music, we encourage interdisciplinary methodologies that place chant in its historical and cultural contexts. We also invite papers that compare Western chant with other monophonic liturgical traditions, providing a broader and more inclusive vision of how the sacred word has been musically projected in different cultures.

Contrapunctus: Many Voices, Many Styles

Contact: Lucia Marchi
Modality: In person
Contrapuntal techniques of any kind (written, oral, improvised) are at the center of the repertory in both secular and sacred music in the Middle Ages. This session invites papers on the many styles, genres, and practices of polyphonic singing, whose vestiges can be found in sources with music notation, as well as in treatises and other texts, and visual arts. Papers can address issues of repertory, techniques, performance and relations among the different genres; they can evaluate methodological tools and their results; and finally, they can deal with theoretical issues of counterpoint and their practical consequences in the repertory.

Instruments and Music

Contact: Sarah Ann Long
Modality: In person
This session explores instrumental music in the Middle Ages. Instruments were used by people of all walks of life and in all geographical areas. We invite contributions that discuss instrument construction and cultural exchange that spawned new musical practices not only in Western Europe but also in Asia, the Middle East, Africa, and beyond. Other topics of interest are instrumental music composition, improvisation, and the connections between music and dance.

Translation, Transformation, Transmission: Global Perspectives on Medieval Music

Contact: Sarah Ann Long
Modality: In person
This session will welcome scholars working on topics, religions, and cultures traditionally considered to be outside the scope of the study of medieval music, including (but by no means limited to) historical ethnomusicologists, anthropologists, sociologists, and so on. It explores how we can de-canonize both Western and non-Western musical cultures. We anticipate papers that will address issues of multilingualism (in historical sources as well as in modern scholarship), multimedia, and cross-cultural exchange, and the usefulness and limits of comparative approaches.

See all sessions organized by Musicology at Kalamazoo

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North American Catalan Society

The History, Culture, and Literature of the Catalan-Speaking Lands: A Dialogue with the European North and Mediterranean World

Contact: John A Bollweg (trecento@comcast.net)
Modality: In person
During the 12th through 15th centuries, the Crown of Aragon, and its various offshoots in the western Mediterranean basin, was one vigorous linguistic and political community in European Christendom. This polity did not emerge as one of the early modern new kingdoms, but nonetheless the region produced important Church scholars (e.g. Ramon Penyafort), works of literature (e.g., Tirant lo Blanc), and historical accomplishments (e.g., the conquest of Valencia). The North American Catalan Society seeks papers that put any of the persons or achievements of the medieval Catalan-speaking lands in the contetxt of contemporary northern European or Mediterranean developments.

Ibero-Medieval Regionalisms and Minoritized Language Traditions (A Roundtable)

Cosponsored by: Ibero-Medieval Association of North America (IMANA)
Contact: John A Bollweg (trecento@comcast.net)
Modality: In person
The medieval Iberian peninsula hosted numerous language and religious traditions that came to be minoritized, subsumed, or even ignored in a predominantly Castilian modern discourse of history and literature, including but not limited to aljamiado literature, peninsular Judaism, Catalans, Galicians, and the Portuguese. The North American Catalan Society (in co-sponsorship with the Ibero-Medieval Association of North America [IMANA]) seeks scholars of these regional and minoritized traditions to discuss the impact of scholarly colonization on their field, as well as the ways contemporary scholars can and have worked to express the independent development of these regions and traditions, despite Castilian triumphalism.

North American Patristics Society

Christianity in Late Antiquity I

Contact: David Maldonado Rivera (maldonadorivera1@kenyon.edu)
Modality: In person
The North American Patristics Society sponsored session Christianity in Late Antiquity 2 seeks abstracts engaging with any aspect of the study of Christianity in Late Antiquity (100–700 C. E.) from any region of the Near East, the Mediterranean, and Europe. These papers can focus on specific regions; comment on written texts and/or material culture; treat different social, intellectual, and religious developments; or discuss particular themes, persons, or events in the context of late ancient societies. Abstracts can call attention to newer methodologies and approaches to the study of late ancient Christianity and/or various aspects of patristics scholarship.

See all sessions organized by North American Patristics Society

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PSALM-Network (Politics, Society and Liturgy in the Middle Ages)

Political Liturgies in the High Middle Ages: Beyond the Legacy of Ernst H. Kantorowicz

Cosponsored by: Liturgica Poloniae
Contact: Paweł Figurski (pawel.figurski.uw@gmail.com)
Modality: In person
Although as long ago as the 1940s Ernst H. Kantorowicz exhorted medievalists to make greater use of liturgical sources, historians largely continued to ignore the “magic thicket of prayers, benedictions, and ecclesiastical rites” that comprise the liturgy. Instead they left liturgical sources to specialists interested in the development of individual rites through time. The individual papers of this session will focus on different polities and regions of medieval Christian Europe, but all will concentrate on the high Middle Ages, a period in which the importance of liturgy to political cultures has traditionally been seen as being in decline.

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Richard Rawlinson Center

Distance Learning in Early Medieval Britain and Ireland

Contact: Rosalind Claire Love
Modality: In person
Many of us have tried various forms of distance learning over the past few years. Teachers and students in early medieval Britain and Ireland often found themselves separated from each other by clerical assignments, missionary activities, even life at royal courts. How did they continue learning and teaching over long distances with the technologies they had? Papers in the session might treat manuscript exchanges and correspondence among scholars in Ireland, England, Scotland, Wales, and mainland Europe. We welcome a variety of approaches, including but not limited to historical, literary, social network theory, feminist theory, and manuscript studies.

The Millennium of the Wolf

Contact: Nicole Guenther Discenza (ndiscenza@usf.edu)
Modality: In person
Archbishop Wulfstan of York died in 1023. Many encounter him through his Sermo Lupi ad Anglos, but his contributions went far beyond his most famous text: other homilies, law, politics, and his compilations and acquisitions. We encourage submissions on manuscripts associated with Wulfstan such as the York Gospels, the Wulfstan Letter Book, and his own writings; his homilies; his contributions to law and politics; and his later influence. Papers may come from a range of disciplines or working across disciplinary boundaries: manuscript studies, law, literature, art history, and history.

Rocky Mountain Medieval and Renaissance Association

Medieval and Early Modern Relationships

Contact: Ginger Lee Smoak (ginger.smoak@utah.edu)
Modality: In person
Relationships are at the core of humanity. This session will focus on the importance of interactions, friendships, and sexual relationships between pre-modern people. Papers will focus on a variety of these relationships: the interpersonal encounters between Muslims and Christians, along with extended conversations between individuals of the two faith cultures, the interactions between early medieval women, and testimony regarding sexual relationships and impotence. These social, legal, and textual relationships shed light on an important aspect of humanity and the historical insight they provide.

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Schoenberg Institute for Manuscript Studies

Editing Rolls in Digital Mappa

Contact: Dot Porter
Modality: In person
Digital Mappa (DM) is an open-source digital humanities platform for open-access workspaces, projects and publications, and it is particularly useful editing non-codex manuscripts such as rolls. This session seeks three papers by scholars who have used DM to edit projects featuring medieval rolls, with the aim to 1) showcase new projects, 2) show how DM supports project development (and suggestions for how it might be improved), and 3) encourage conversation and collaboration amongst scholars.

See all sessions organized by Schoenberg Institute for Manuscript Studies

Selden Society

Law as Culture XXIII: Substance, Procedure, and Institutions in the Middle Ages

Contact: Alexander Volokh
Modality: In person
We accept submissions from any area of legal history (e.g. English, Celtic, Continental, Roman, Canon) and from any period within the Middle Ages. We encourage a variety of methods, from traditional legal analysis to interdisciplinary approaches (merging legal history with, e.g., economics, political science, literature, anthropology, etc.), and also welcome junior scholars and graduate students.

Societas Magica

“Ars magica sub philosophia”? The Rise of Learned Magic in the Late Middle Ages

Cosponsored by: Research Group on Manuscript Evidence
Contact: Vajra Regan (vajra.regan@mail.utoronto.ca)
Modality: In person
The Late Middle Ages saw the rise of increasingly sophisticated and intellectual forms of magic. Inevitably, this prompted a number of important thinkers to situate certain types of magic under philosophy. This session aims to bring together papers from scholars in diverse disciplines so as to better understand the various cultural, intellectual, and institutional causes responsible for the construction of medieval learned magic.

Moving Parts and Pedagogy I: Teaching Magic and Other Occult Arts

Cosponsored by: Research Group on Manuscript Evidence
Contact: David Porreca
Modality: In person
Magic, alchemy, geomancy, and other occult arts were never part of the official curriculum in any medieval Christian university faculty. Moreover, magical treatises abound in claims of legitimacy in terms of belonging alongside other more overtly recognized sciences. Nevertheless, the abundance of surviving treatises, manuals, and commentaries suggests that there must have been some means outside the bounds of officially recognized institutions for these bodies of knowledge and practices to have been taught, learned, and transmitted, despite the negative light often cast upon them in ‘mainstream’ circles. This session aims to investigate the pedagogy of such arts and practices.

Moving Parts and Pedagogy II: Teaching Astrology and Other Liberal Arts

Cosponsored by: Research Group on Manuscript Evidence
Contact: David Porreca
Modality: In person
During the later Middle Ages, astrology began to play an ever more prominent role in university curricula. It was frequently merged with astronomy as one of the Seven Liberal Arts, and it became required knowledge for the practice of medicine. These developments created a need for new masters capable of rendering its intricacies intelligible to the next generation of doctors and other practitioners. This session aims to examine how the pedagogy of astrology functioned, and how the teaching of that discipline fits alongside the rest of the Liberal Arts curriculum.

See all sessions organized by Societas Magica

Société Guilhem IX

Speculative Philology

Contact: Courtney Joseph Wells
Modality: In person
We take “speculative philology” as a term for any moment when an editor or critic or performer is obliged to fill in a lacuna in the surviving text or melody, whether the gap has been created by damage to the manuscript, by a scribal error or oversight such as an eye skip, or by a copyist’s more intentional suppression of a passage. Faced with such a lacuna, the scholar must choose between printing an ellipsis and offering an educated guess for the missing material. What are the broader literary, philological, and musicological implications of these choices in a modern edition?

Spotlight on Raimbaut de Vaqueiras (A Roundtable)

Contact: Courtney Joseph Wells
Modality: In person
This roundtable, the second in the Société Guilhem IX’s “spotlight” series, will focus on Raimbaut de Vaqueiras, one of the most innovative and widely traveled of the troubadours. Moving from his native Provence into Italy, and then, with Boniface I of Montferrat, to Constantinople and Thessalonica, Raimbaut experimented with versification, multi-lingual poems, and new genres, lyric or otherwise. Eight of his melodies survive. We welcome proposals dealing with any aspect of Raimbaut’s work or biography. We particularly encourage participants to engage with songs that are not frequently the object of scholarly commentary

Société Rencesvals, American-Canadian Branch

Cultural Palimpsests: Adaptation, Transposition, and Translation in/from Epics in Romance Languages

Contact: Ana Grinberg
Modality: In person
In his influential Palimpsests, Genette proposed terms to refer to the relationship among texts: intertextuality, paratextuality, metatextuality, architextuality, and hypertextuality. Some of these connections are not new to medieval scholars. Yet, textual networks might be more productively explored against trade routes, religious and political invasions, and ideological shifts. How are textual transpositions anchored in cultural clashes and exchanges? We invite papers that consider intertextual transpositions where epics in romance languages are in the center, both as hypotexts (i.e. sources of characters, motifs, etc.) and hypertexts (that is, adaptations, appropriations, and translations of other stories, messages, etc. as source texts).

The Digital Middle Ages: Possibilities, Limitations, Expectations (A Roundtable)

Contact: Norval Bard (nlbard@noctrl.edu)
Modality: In person
Technology has enriched the practice of people working in scholarly research, university teaching, and education of the general public. Open-access and digitized manuscripts and editions, georeferencing and map visualizations of textual corpus, immersive and augmented realities from the past: technologies have provided opportunities to collectively analyze, represent and disseminate information related to medieval literature and culture. This roundtable session will consider the intersection of diverse technologies and the romance epic. More than simply showcasing accomplishments, we invite to a conversation considering limitations and forward-looking approaches to using technologies in connection to epics and their contexts.

Society for International Brut Studies

New Directions in Brut Studies

Contact: Ken Tiller (kjt9t@uvawise.edu)
Modality: In person
The multilingual character and enduring influence of the Brut tradition raise important questions about the relationship of language, history, authority, and ethnicity. The session welcomes papers that examine the Brut from a language-based methodology, including translation theory (Brut authors as translators or issues translating the Bruts), textual authority, and the relationship of language to ethnic identity or to gender. Issues for discussion include how translation reorients historical texts, how authors and translators establish textual authority, the relationship of language to ethnic identity and/or geographic borders, and related topics. Other critical approaches, such as border theory or eco-criticism, will be considered.

See all sessions organized by Society for International Brut Studies

Society for Late Antiquity

Late Antiquity I–II

Contact: Jonathan Arnold
Modality: In person
The Society for Late Antiquity sponsored sessions Late Antiquity I and II seek abstract submissions for the thoughtful study of any aspect of late antiquity, from any period ranging from ca. 250–750, and from any region of Europe, the Mediterranean, world, and the Middle East. Such papers might focus on a specific region, time, or development; comment on a vast array of written and/or material sources; or treat a particular theme, person, or event, as long as they are late antique.

Society for Medieval Feminist Scholarship (SMFS)

Intersectional Reflections on Tamora Pierce (A Roundtable)

Cosponsored by: Society for Queer Medieval Studies (SQMS)
Contact: Kersti Francis
Modality: In person
YA fantasy author Tamora Pierce is well-known for her world-building based on extensive medieval research. Over the course of her thirty-year, forty-book career, Pierce's medievalism has evolved alongside our scholarly understandings of the racial, gendered, and sexual diversity of the Global Middle Ages. Taking feminism as its central ethos, Pierce's ouvre moves between reifying whiteness and providing visions of a medieval world unrestrained by cis hetero patriarchy. This roundtable welcomes respondents' critiques on the relationship between Pierce and medievalism, reflections on Pierce's work in relationship to speakers' own experience as medievalists, and proposals beyond these suggestions.

Standing Accountable for the Histories under Our Own Feet: Towards a Medievalist Feminist Praxis in Public History

Contact: Katharine W. Jager (jagerk@uhd.edu)
Modality: In person
Feminist medievalists are uniquely trained to consider history, difference, gender, embodiment, and identity. As monuments honoring “the winners of history” are removed from their plinths, this panel considers how we might use our skills to engage with public history and community memorialization programs to present more honest and more just histories. We ask: how does our training help us stand accountable for the unacknowledged histories under our own feet? How does it affirm a commitment to recuperating and memorializing “ugly” histories? How might public history and community memorialization projects help resist the nostalgia that dominates received narratives about the past?

See all sessions organized by Society for Medieval Feminist Scholarship (SMFS)

Society for Medieval Germanic Studies (SMGS)

Germanic Philology: New Approaches to History of Language

Contact: Adam Oberlin
Modality: In person
This open session on philology invites papers on Old English and Old Norse, and especially less frequently represented languages, including Old High German, Old Saxon, Gothic, Runic, Middle Dutch, and Old Yiddish.

Notable Books in Medieval Germanic Studies (A Roundtable)

Contact: Evelyn Meyer (evelyn.meyer@slu.edu)
Modality: In person
In this unique roundtable session, two authors of recently published monographs in medieval German Studies present their work. In 2023, our focus is translation with CJ Jones discussing her Women’s History in the Age of Reformation: Johannes Meyer’s Chronicle of the Dominican Observance (St Michael’s College Mediaeval Translations. Toronto: PIMS Publications, 2019) and William T. Whobrey discussing his Gottfried von Straßburg’s Tristan and Isolde with Ulrich von Türheim’s Continuation (Indianapolis/Cambridge: Hackett Publishing Co. Inc., 2020). These monographs make a major contribution not only to German but also to the field of medieval studies across disciplines.

Textual Transformations I: Translating Medieval Texts Today

Contact: Evelyn Meyer (evelyn.meyer@slu.edu)
Modality: In person
Translations into modern languages expand the size of the audience that can access and engage with medieval texts. This session focuses on recent bilingual editions, e.g., in the TEAMS series of Medieval German texts. We seek to foster a how-to conversation about how translators envision their audience or adapt their translations to their intended audience (scholars, students, etc.). Several of the current translators as well as the editors will be on hand to discuss the how, the what, and the why of projects that will play a significant role in further interdisciplinary conversations across medieval languages and cultures.

Textual Transformations II: Translations and Intended Audiences Then and Now

Contact: Evelyn Meyer (evelyn.meyer@slu.edu)
Modality: In person
Translations into modern languages expand access to medieval texts; however, translations in the middle ages took myriad creative forms. This session will discuss translation broadly in cultural context throughout the middle ages to the present. Papers will address topics like: the intended audience (and reception) of medieval translations of medieval or earlier texts; translations between two medieval languages or translations of older texts into a medieval language/context; translations that transform manuscript text into physical objects (in the sense of artwork and crafts) or contribute to our understanding physical objects from the medieval period (manuscripts, archeology, clothing, arms/armor).

Society for Queer Medieval Studies (SQMS)

Asexual Possibilities in the Middle Ages

Contact: Kylie L Owens (kylie.l.owens@wmich.edu)
Modality: In person
Asexuality is often conflated with abstinence or chastity by modern readers of medieval literature and historical record. However, when engaging with medieval persons who we might label as ‘chaste,’ be they fictional characters or historical figures, there is an opportunity to investigate how they interact with their society and its sexual norms; could they be rejecting these norms? subverting them? creating a new sexual moral of their own? This session endeavors to draw attention to accounts of asexual medieval people, examine how we—as modern scholars—can interpret these accounts, and foster conversation about asexuality in the Middle Ages.

BDSM in the Middle Ages and Medievalisms

Contact: Martine Mussies (martinemussies@gmail.com)
Modality: In person
The last two decades have seen a revival in queer readings of medieval and medieval-inspired texts, but an underexposed theme is BDSM. As BDSM aesthetics and jargon are heavily influenced by modern ideas about the medieval, this panel seeks to explore notions of fetish and kink in the Middle Ages and its Nachleben. We invite scholars to reflect on depictions of interpersonal relationships with a non-normative streak. Please note that we adhere to contemporary definitions that consider SSC (safe, sane and consensual) as the fundamental principle for the exercise of BDSM and require informed consent of all parties involved.

Encounters in Medieval Trans Studies

Contact: Nico Mara-McKay
Modality: In person
Medieval trans studies has emerged as a developing field that complicates modern assumptions about binary gender, gender nonconformity, and trans subjectivity in medieval literary, artistic, and historical documents. Medieval people employed a range of terms to denote various aspects of gender presentation, performance, and embodiment in medieval Europe, including nonbinary genders, in ways that do not neatly map onto modern trans or queer theory. As such, this session seeks papers that engage in questions and/or broach solutions to the theoretical and methodological challenges found within medieval trans studies.

See all sessions by Society for Queer Medieval Studies (SQMS)

Society for the Advancement of Scandinavian Studies

Scandinavian Studies

Contact: Shaun F. D. Hughes (sfdh@purdue.edu)
Modality: In person
Papers are invited on any aspect of Medieval Scandinavian Studies or modern Scandinavian medievalisms.

Society for the Study of the Bible in the Middle Ages (SSBMA)

Interfaith Approaches to the Books of Moses

Contact: Frans van Liere (fvliere@calvin.edu)
Modality: In person
Recent scholarship on the reception of Biblical texts in the medieval world is no longer confined to studies on Christian commentary. The biblical books, especially those of the Hebrew Biblical tradition, resonate in more than one religious tradition. The first books of the Bible, for instance, figure prominently in three Abrahamic traditions, Judaism, Christianity and Islam, as Torah, Pentateuch, and Tawrat, respectively. This session aims to highlight these biblical texts as loci of interfaith encounter and dialogue, and invites papers that address the reception of these biblical materials in an interfaith environment.

See all sessions organized by Society for the Study of the Bible in the Middle Ages (SSBMA)

Spenser at Kalamazoo

Spenser at Kalamazoo I–III

Contact: David Wilson-Okamura
Modality: In person
Spenser at Kalamazoo invites paper abstracts on any topic dealing with Edmund Spenser, including teaching. As always, we encourage submissions from newcomers, including graduate students, and from established scholars of all ranks. Abstracts that outline an argument are usually more successful than ones that just announce a topic. Reading time for the completed paper should not exceed 20 minutes. According to Congress rules, those submitting abstracts for one session may not submit abstracts for other sessions in the same year. Papers submitted should not have been read elsewhere nor be scheduled for publication in the near future.

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TEAMS (Teaching Association for Medieval Studies)

Magistra Doctissima: Celebrating Prof. Bonnie Wheeler’s Contributions to Medieval Studies and TEAMS (A Roundtable)

Contact: Deborah M. Sinnreich-Levi (dsinnrei@stevens.edu)
Modality: In person
This roundtable in honor of Bonnie Wheeler and her support of TEAMS invites former students, friends and colleagues to discuss the impact of Prof. Wheeler’s scholarly activities, sponsorships, encouragement of women scholars, and her work for TEAMS has had on medieval studies. Discussions of the history and influence of TEAMS, the emphasis on the importance of inspirational teaching and innovative scholarship that is the hallmark of Prof. Wheeler’s work are all welcome. This panel discussion hopes to draw scholars from across the disciplines and may result in a dedicated volume of The Once and Future Classroom.

Medieval Studies in Elementary and Secondary Classroom Instruction (A Roundtable)

Contact: Deborah M. Sinnreich-Levi (dsinnrei@stevens.edu)
Modality: In person
Medieval studies are frequently ignored in primary and secondary education, yet educators at all levels teach medieval topics that are aligned with core standards. This panel considers the benefits of teaching medieval studies at these levels and how to overcome imposed limits and restrictions. Introducing medieval subjects in students’ education enlarges students’ worldview and encourages interest in medieval culture in Europe and beyond. Speakers may also engage with co-opting of medieval studies by white supremacists. This roundtable hopes to draw submissions from across the disciplines and may result in a dedicated volume of The Once and Future Classroom.

Supporting Women Scholars in Medieval Studies: Alumnae of the Bonnie Wheeler Fellowship (A Roundtable)

Contact: Deborah M. Sinnreich-Levi (dsinnrei@stevens.edu)
Modality: In person
The Bonnie Wheeler Foundation Fellowship Program’s supports women medievalists below the rank of full professor. Founded in 2011 in honor of Professor Emerita Bonnie Wheeler, (Arthurian, Chaucerian, feminist), the fellowship continues to support women scholars seeking promotion beyond the Associate Professor level and to enable them to rise to leadership positions. In celebration of the countless contributions Prof. Wheeler has made to TEAMS in addition to many other organizations and publications, this session will honor her by presenting Fellowship winners the opportunity to discuss how the Fellowship and Prof. Wheeler’s support enriched their scholarship and their careers.

Texas Medieval Association (TEMA)

Objects and Voices of Propaganda in Medieval Iberia

Contact: Yasmine Beale-Rivaya
Modality: In person
We invite papers that explore how objects of luxury, such as chess boards, textiles, sculptures, glass decorative items, religious objects, and even commissioned books or written works produced in the Muslim territories of al-Andalus (711–1492) were used in the Kingdom of Castille for purposes of propaganda by Christian kingdoms. The panelists argue that it was important for the 'owners' of the luxury items to associated themselves with these fetishized objects to argue for their own value by association. At the same time, these objects were purposefully de-contextualized so as to obscure their provenance and imply production.

Thomas Aquinas Society

Thomas Aquinas I: Sacred Scripture and the Catena aurea

Contact: John F. Boyle (jfboyle@stthomas.edu)
Modality: In person
This session will focus on Thomas Aquinas as an interpreter of Scripture with special attention to his Catena aurea.

Thomas Aquinas II–III

Contact: John F. Boyle (jfboyle@stthomas.edu)
Modality: In person
These sessions are dedicated to the life and work of Thomas Aquinas. Multiple disciplinary perspectives welcome.

Tolkien at Kalamazoo

Christopher Tolkien: Medievalist Editor of J. R. R. Tolkien’s Legendarium

Contact: Yvette Kisor (ykisor@ramapo.edu)
Modality: In person
The publication of The Great Tales Never End: Essays in Memory of Christopher Tolkien in September 2022 affords us an opportunity to investigate the work of Christopher Tolkien as editor. Edited by the Bodleian’s librarian Richard Ovenden and Tolkien Archivist Catherine McIlwaine, this volume is well concerned with the work of reading and editing manuscripts. A medievalist by training, Christopher is best known as the editor of his father’s legendarium. This paper session invites contributions that engage with the memorial volume and consider the role of Christopher Tolkien’s background in medieval texts as editor of J. R. R. Tolkien’s manuscripts.

Medieval Elements in Amazon's The Lord of the Rings: The Rings of Power (A Roundtable)

Contact: Yvette Kisor (ykisor@ramapo.edu)
Modality: In person
The upcoming Amazon Prime series The Lord of the Rings: The Rings of Power, due to premiere in September 2022, explores the Second Age of Middle-earth. The announcement of the series, followed by the release of images and a trailer, has suggested that the world constructed by the show contains a number of elements that appear to draw on the Middle Ages. This roundtable invites contributions that consider the medieval elements in the series, both elements of design and narrative, and including structures of society, government, and relations among societies.

See all sessions organized by Tolkien at Kalamazoo

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Univ. Autónoma de Madrid

Archaeology of the Medieval Iberian Peninsula: Latest Findings in the Alhambra of Granada, the Great Mosque of Cordova, and in the City of Madinat al-Zahra

Cosponsored by: Univ. Autónoma de Madrid
Contact: Fernando Valdés Fernández
Modality: In person
Over the past thirty years, medieval archaeology in Spain and Portugal has yielded an enormous amount of historically valuable information. Many of the results have not been widely disseminated, especially when the findings originate outside of well-planned scientific projects. Cases of special relevance are the works developed in Cordoba, Medina Azahara and Granada. The works to be presented in this panel are related to the latest findings of the excavations in the courtyard of the Mosque of Cordoba, in the Palace of Medina Azahara and in the Alhambra in Granada.

Special sessions

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The Abbey of Saint-Victor, Paris I: Life in the Abbey of Saint-Victor

Contact: Grover A. Zinn (grover.zinn@oberlin.edu)
Modality: In person
This session brings attention to Victorine developments in the training of novices, in liturgical life, in education, and in the role of the Abbey in the religious and intellectual life in Paris. Publication of Victorine Texts in Translation brings together well-known and lesser-known texts with full introductions to highlight the spectrum of sources available to expand knowledge of the rich life of this twelfth-century community of Regular Canons.

The Abbey of Saint-Victor, Paris II: Spirituality and Theology in the Abbey of Saint-Victor

Contact: Grover A. Zinn (grover.zinn@oberlin.edu)
Modality: In person
This session brings attention to Victorine developments in spiritual teaching and theological reflection which were major contributions to those traditions leading into the thirteenth and later centuries. Hugh and Richard were masters in both of these areas and their works combine texts and (“structural”) images (particularly Biblical, e.g. Ark of Noah, Ark of Moses, 12 stones in crossing the Jordan) in powerful narrative and transformative ways.

Alfredian Texts and Contexts

Contact: Nicole Guenther Discenza (ndiscenza@usf.edu)
Modality: In person
Alfred the Great had a major impact on England from the late ninth century onwards. Whether he personally wrote and translated texts, designed new fortifications and ships, made legal innovations, sponsored the production of art and manuscripts, or made a name that others used to claim authority later, “King Alfred” calls to mind many significant works and developments. “Alfredian Texts and Contexts” welcomes submissions on the circle of Alfred and developments associated with it from both newcomers and established scholars. Proposals may focus on literature, history, archaeology, manuscript studies, art history, numismatics, or interdisciplinary work.

All That Glitters: Gold, God, and the Shining Other in the Beowulf Manuscript and Other Early English Texts

Contact: Jan Blaschak (eb7549@wayne.edu)
Modality: In person
This panel will explore ideas about how tropes of gold and shining were used in Early English texts like those in the Beowulf manuscript to indicate otherness of many types, including the monstrous, heroic, or saintly. I am especially inviting papers exploring women's status, identity and “otherness,” which speaks to many ongoing issues, both in understanding Early English culture and literature but also reflecting current issues.

Arthur Kingsley Porter 100 Years Later I–II

Contact: Erik Gustafson (egustafson.phd@gmail.com)
Modality: In person
2023 marks the 100th anniversary of Arthur Kingsley Porter’s seminal Romanesque Sculpture of the Pilgrimage Roads, providing an opportunity to revisit one of medieval art history’s foundational thinkers. These sessions aim to address the work of Porter and the paradigms he created for the field. Papers might address questions such as: what is the relevance of Porter's methodologies to art historical approaches of the twentieth and twenty-first century? How have Porter’s approaches contributed to the continued nationalization of medieval art and architecture? How have ‘big ideas’ such as a pilgrimage road style fared in the development of medieval historiography?

Beyond Boundaries in the First Millennium Atlantic Archipelago

Contact: Sharon M. Wofford
Modality: In person
This session seeks papers interested in interrogating boundaries in the study of the islands of the North Atlantic in the first millennium. Papers are especially welcome from scholars who work on the edges of the defined boundaries of their region of study, chronological period, and/or home discipline. Papers may also concern a medieval instance of boundary-breaking or defying convention.

The Canterbury Fails, Live and in Person (A Roundtable)

Contact: David K. Coley (david_coley@sfu.ca)
Modality: In person
The Canterbury Fails Podcast explores medieval texts that have generated two or fewer scholarly publications since 2000. Grounded in an ethos of academic conviviality, it introduces ignored works of medieval literature and stages a lighthearted but informed discussion of their dubious highlights. Why, you ask, would anyone do this? Despite their arcane nature, these texts open questions of canon formation and reveal medieval and modern habits of thought. They also illuminate marginalized corners of medieval culture, while the freewheeling discussions model a collaborative, public-facing mode of inquiry. This session encourages participants to make discoveries among lost, ignored, and suppressed texts.

Carolingian View from Creation

Contact: Lynda L. Coon (llcoon@uark.edu)
Modality: In person
Carolingian View from Creation tackles the Frankish world from the perspective of three actors: Antichrist, demons, and God. Panelists deploy a variety of media—textual, architectural, visual, material, and ritual—to reconstruct Carolingian Christianity through an otherworldly lens. The presenters survey Carolingian lands from the heavens to the abyss, from the frontier zone of empire to the centers of human authority, from the moment of Creation to the end of days. In so doing, the panelists center on what is (largely) unseen—God, demons, Antichrist—to gauge how the otherworldly manifests itself through disruptions of human bodies and earthly spaces.

Close Readings of Old English Literature

Contact: Andrew Scheil (ascheil@umn.edu)
Modality: In person
The patient analysis of Old English texts (prose or poetry)—word by word, phrase by phrase— is in itself rewarding, but is also foundational for other important endeavors in the field: e.g., comparative philology, lexicography, oral-formulaic analysis, editing, source study. This session will provide a forum for applied close readings of Old English literary texts. We encourage papers that move from the careful analysis of words and phrases to a broader interpretation of a single text. The session will focus more on the engagement with discreet verbal textures, rather than on historical contexts, comparative work, reception, or methodological reflections.

Distance in Medieval Thought, Belief, and Practice

Contact: Beth Williamson (beth.williamson@bristol.ac.uk)
Modality: In person
Distance could be a frustration, but could also provide opportunities. Overcoming physical barriers to access to, or sight of, a holy place or object might offer the possible benefit of deferred access, or stimulus to think differently about the object of attention. Sound that carries—music, prayer, or bells—might allow for an auditory participation in a distant or invisible liturgical celebration. A squint giving on to a chancel emphasises separation, but also provides visual access. This session invites contributions that consider the potential frustrations and/or benefits of distance from any discipline, or using any type of source.

Health, Illness, Medicine, and Bodies in Medieval Northern Europe, 700⁠–1500 CE

Contact: Luthien Cangemi (luthien.cangemi.20@ucl.ac.uk)
Modality: In person
This panel explores the conceptions of bodies, health, illness and medicine in the Nordic areas of Medieval Europe: England, Ireland, Wales, Scotland, Scandinavia and Iceland, with an emphasis on how social factors such as gender, race, class, sexual orientation, religion, physical ability and culture contact can impact such ideas. The interdisciplinary approach of the panel welcomes contributions from the fields of history, literature, philosophy, science, religion, art, archaeology, and manuscript studies. Contributors are invited to analyse their sources both in Latin and vernacular languages, addressing questions pertaining to the social constructions of health, illness and medicine and their historical framework.

Heterodoxy and Orthodoxy in Augustine of Hippo and His Critics

Contact: Marianne Djuth (djuth@canisius.edu)
Modality: In person
As bishop of Hippo, Augustine defended orthodox Christianity against opponents of the Christian faith: Manichaeans, Donatists, Pelagians, Massilians. In each instance, Augustine encounters an opponent who also claims to possess the truth of Christianity. This session seeks to determine how, if at all, Augustine's encounters with his critics impacted his understanding of Christianity and to examine the legitimacy of his critics' accusations that his teachings are heterodox.

Hiberno- and Anglo-Latin Studies

Contact: Brian S Cook (bscook1066@gmail.com)
Modality: In person
Despite the ubiquity of Latin writing across the British Isles, scholarship tends to focus on vernacular texts, crafting narratives of nascent literary traditions often seen through a proto-lingo-nationalistic lenses. And yet, the British Isles are home to some unique forms of decentralized Latin often resulting from extensive use of glossaries without the aid of the “native speakers” on the Continent.Of special interest are papers that focus on the interaction of various Latin traditions: Hiberno- and Anglo-, Insular and Continental, etc.; and papers that focus on Latin and vernacular interactions, whether they be linguistic, literary, geographical, political, or religious.

Maligned Memories: The Medieval World and Postcolonial Legacies

Contact: Anna C Kelley (ack20@st-andrews.ac.uk)
Modality: In person
This session will examine the legacies of colonial political and institutional structures on interpretive paradigms that continue to shape modern conceptions of medieval 'globalisms' in Afro-Eurasia, with particular emphasis on the role of material culture and archaeological excavation. Central questions include: how was archaeology used (and misused) in the eighteenth and nineteenth century to reconstruct the medieval world outside of Europe? How were local histories subsumed by globalising narratives? How have the legacies of 'empire' become embedded in definitions of global medievalisms? How have regional postcolonial discourses perpetuated fragmentary geographic categories? How have cultural frontiers been created and disrupted?

Manuscripts for Reading Aloud

Contact: Christoph Uiting
Modality: In person
Which manuscripts were used for public reading? And how can we prove this use? How can we distinguish manuscripts for reading aloud in private and for public reading? The script, layout, punctuation and the use of tonic accents, even neumes or litterae significativae, but also the choice of texts can provide viable indications. ‘Scoring’ (Leonard E. Boyle) for reading aloud and other strategies of encoding and visualizing performance cues can be explored as part of a ‘Grammar of Legibility’ (Malcolm B. Parkes). We invite contributions on specific (Western) manuscripts as well as methodological discussions on this topic.

Medieval Ecclesiastical Architecture: Faith, Meaning, and Sentiment in Stone and Heart

Contact: Richard Nicholas (rnicholas@stfrancis.edu)
Modality: In person
The recent fire at the cathedral of Notre Dame de Paris has sparked much discussion on the spiritual faith, meaning, and sentiment that medieval churches convey and evoke. What insights did medieval church builders have into the reasons why a church building fosters personal commitment to the faith and even attachment to the building itself? Why and how do the laws of belief and prayer relate in essence to the laws of building and living (lex credendi, lex orandi, lex aedificandi, lex vivendi)? This session will propose and explore answers.

The Medieval Tradition of Natural Law I: Natural Law and Moral Philosophy

Contact: Harvey Brown (hbrown2@uwo.ca)
Modality: In person
These sessions on The Medieval Tradition of Natural Law welcome papers that explore not only the Natural Law thinking in a wide range of Medieval thinkers but also papers that explore the impact of the tradition in subsequent centuries on both political and moral philosophy.

The Medieval Tradition of Natural Law II: Natural Law and Political Philosophy

Contact: Harvey Brown (hbrown2@uwo.ca)
Modality: In person
These sessions bring together scholars working on Natural Law that have few other opportunities to gather to discuss each other's research and share ideas and paths forward for new research.

Movement and Activation: Social Sculpture in the Global Middle Ages

Contact: Ariela Algaze
Modality: In person
We invite papers that might address subjects such as how medieval sculptural programs shaped and transformed various social, political, or religious communities through direct and indirect contact. We welcome investigations excavating premodern performance practices via the paradigm of “social sculpture,” with an emphasis on the diverse and global medieval world system. Possible subjects might include: participatory sculpture, performance, and spectacle, the role of the sculpted body-in-space in structuring religious ritual, manipulation of the body in penitential and confessory settings, and delimiting premodern race and community building through public oaths and acts of conversion.

Music and Liturgy in the Low Countries

Contact: Miriam Wendling
Modality: In person
This session brings together recent research on medieval music, musicians, and sources in the Low Countries. Papers dealing with any aspect of music and liturgy in the Low Countries are welcome.

Networks of Song and Story: Convent and Community in Medieval France

Contact: Rachel May Golden (rmgolden@utk.edu)
Modality: In person
This session proposes an interdisciplinary approach to women’s communities centered at French religious houses, and interprets creative, devotional, and other kinds of output inspired by these institutional contexts. How did music, art, liturgies, and literature figure in representations and articulations of these women’s voices? We consider how such works created networks among writers, readers, and performers, and we investigate how convents, functioning as inspiration and narrative loci, shaped lyric and text. We aim to newly demonstrate how particular institutional contexts framed gendered expression and communal life, and how particular works reflected and fashioned women’s voices, within and beyond convent walls.

New Research in Medieval Parish Church Art and Architecture II

Contact: Sarah Blick
Modality: In person
Parish churches were found throughout medieval Europe. Serving the spiritual needs of local populations, these buildings became centers of public life, providing religious services, processions, and pageants to secular assemblies, tax collection, and alms distribution. Surviving examples feature important architecture, sculpture, stained glass, wall painting, and liturgical furniture—most vastly understudied. These sessions seek to explore this extensive corpus of material from a range of temporal, regional, disciplinary, theoretical, and methodological perspectives. Especially welcome are contributions that reflect on how evolving research on the art and architecture of the parish church broadens, deepens, and transforms our understanding of medieval society.

New Work in Medieval Religious Studies

Contact: Barbara Zimbalist
Modality: In person
Authors who have recently published in the Journal of Medieval Religious Cultures will discuss how they will move forward and expand on these projects.

Next-Door Strangers: Alterity at Home in Late Medieval France

Contact: Julie Singer
Modality: In person
Charity begins at home, but so, too, does alterity; notions of foreignness can emerge even in neighborhoods and other highly localized spaces where diverse populations coexist. We seek papers that interrogate the manifold inclusions and exclusions of the “strangers within” late medieval French society, and what the cultural representations of their proximate alterities reveal. Topics may include internal migration, religious difference and the Jewish experience, class, gender, and disability. Who is socially incorporated and who remains “foreign”? What is unique about later medieval French representations of the “other” next door? And what does it mean to “belong”?

Nineteenth- and Twentieth-Century Medievalisms

Contact: Daniel C. Najork
Modality: In person
Proposals might explore the factors shaping nineteenth- and twentieth-century poetry and fiction about the Middle Ages or that used the medieval as a pretext. What historical, social, and intellectual views shaped nineteenth- and twentieth-century approaches to the Middle Ages? How did a self-conscious use of the Middle Ages that combines both the historical record and imagination allow writers and artists to reflect and critique commercial, social, and political realities as well as create the Middle Ages that their contemporaries desired and needed.

“No Exit”: What Happened to Hermione? (A Roundtable)

Contact: Sarah Waters (sarah.waters@buckingham.ac.uk)
Modality: In person
In Winter's Tale, Hermione's presence lingers in her absence. But, what happens to her when she exits, and what does re-entering look like? Drawing on medieval miracle and morality plays, as well as Greene's Pandosto Shakespeare places Hermione in a liminal space (or does he?). This roundtable will invite lively discussion of different explorations of where Hermione might have gone, how far she might have gone, whether or not she traversed the bounds of mortality in her absence, the risks and benefits of using spiritual language to describe her journey, and why we should wonder about where she is anyway.

Old English Literature, Analogues, and Comparative Approaches

Contact: Jana K. Schulman (jana.schulman@wmich.edu)
Modality: In person
This session seeks paper proposals that explore Old English literature in the context of global analogues. Sagas taught with Beowulf demonstrate that examining analogues is a profitable endeavor, opening up possibilities of shared motifs; the folktale characteristics that underlie these stories; and how the stories vary. What do analogue studies and/or a comparative approach add to our understanding of an Old English text? The opposite also holds true—what does a reading or interpretation of an Old English text do for our understanding of a text from the global Middle Ages? We look forward to finding out.

Old Saxon Translation and Intertextuality (A Roundtable)

Contact: David Eugene Clark (clarkd@sunysuffolk.edu)
Modality: In person
This roundtable seeks proposals addressing either the intercultural contexts of the Hêliand or how translations of the poem drive current engagement. Any approach to addressing how the Hêliand intersects with other medieval cultural contexts (such as Early England) or how translation questions affect contemporary understandings of the text are encouraged. We especially welcome submissions from a diverse range of teaching contexts, including departments of religion, art history, literature, and language.

On the Way: Conversion Narratives as Pilgrimage

Contact: Joe Ricke (jsricke@outlook.com)
Modality: In person
Thomas Merton, Malcolm X, Dorothy Day, Jack Kerouac, C. S. Lewis: the list is long of modern converts (of different sorts) who present their experiences as a pilgrimage. Whether their source is Bunyan, Dante, other medieval pilgrims, Muslim traditional pilgrim tales, or the like, the desire to be “on the road” to truth (or meaning, fulfillment, God, transcendence) appears to be as old and as embedded in human consciousness as movement itself. This session seeks scholarly papers, reflections from pilgrims, and creative work to help us reconsider this most understand and appreciate this ancient and still-relevant practice.

Papers by Undergraduates I–II

Contact: Richard Nicholas (rnicholas@stfrancis.edu)
Modality: In person
Undergraduate students researching any aspect of the Middle Ages are invited to submit papers to these sessions.

Racializing Late Medieval France’s Borderlands

Contact: Julie Singer
Modality: In person
Medieval conceptions of the “foreign” relied not only on the imagination of far-off people and places, but on constantly renegotiated relationships with nearer neighbors. For late medieval France, “intimate strangers” included Flanders, Burgundy, Brittany, Navarre, Savoie, the Empire—peoples with whom the French often shared familial, religious, and ethnic affinities, yet whom they distinguished from themselves in stark, sometimes racialized terms. This panel considers what happens to patterns of medieval race-thinking when political and cultural borders change: how is the former “other” incorporated, or the neighbor estranged? We welcome scholars from all disciplines working on late medieval French culture.

René d'Anjou's Artistic and Authorial Legacy I–II

Contact: Justin M Sturgeon (jsturgeon@uwf.edu)
Modality: In person
Proposals are sought for 20 minute papers on the topic of the artistic and authorial legacy of René d'Anjou. Scholars working from within a variety of disciplines, as well as those utilizing multi- and interdisciplinary methodologies are encouraged to submit abstracts. Preference will be given to papers that focus on the declaration of status and legacy through the artistic patronage and authorial identity of René d'Anjou. Proposals on other patrons or authors, or those considering a broader context, will be considered provided that they align with one or more of the sessions' goals.

Session in Memory of Ellen L. Friedrich: Gender and the Comic

Contact: Mary Leech (mary.leech@uc.edu)
Modality: In person
Ellen L. Friedrich was a scholar of French and Spanish literature, and published work about French romance and the comic. This session encourages submissions focused on the comic, particularly about gender perceptions, sexuality, and gender relations. The works do not need to be specifically comic, but the topic should cover issues of the comic and its purpose in the literature. Ideally, the papers would focus on continental literature, but any topic related to gender and the comic will be considered.

Smells Like Teen Spirit: Perspectives on Teen and Young Adult Medievalisms

Contact: Meg Cornell (meganec3@illinois.edu)
Modality: In person
How do you do, fellow [teens]? This session invites papers covering teenagers in medievalism/medievalism for teenagers, considering genres such as literature, television/movies, video/tabletop games, comic books, etc. We investigate questions such as: Why do creators turn to young adult (YA) media to tell medieval stories? What makes medievalism useful for teenage audiences? “Who”—in the words of Tracy Deonn—”gets to be legendary”? Perspectives might consider both the Middle Ages and teenage years as being caught “in the middle”, the pedagogy of teaching YA medievalism, global medievalism in YA media, how teenage medievalisms center BIPOC, queer, and gender diverse perspectives, etc.

Studies in the Hêliand

Contact: David Eugene Clark (clarkd@sunysuffolk.edu)
Modality: In person
This session seeks abstracts examining any aspect of the Hêliand, the chief surviving text written in the Old Saxon language. In this remarkable work, the poet adapts Tatian's Diatessaron into a Germanic epic by, among other things, adopting alliterative verse and refiguring Jesus as a Germanic lord. While all topics and approaches are welcome, we are especially interested in: the relationship between the Hêliand, its sources, and other Germanic translations of the Diatessaron; the poet's choices while adapting the text; and the Hêliand’s relationship to works of Old English literature.