Spring 2020 Honors College Course Catalog

Important Information:

Oct. 22, 2019: Priority registration.

Jan. 6, 2020: Classes begin.

Jan. 10, 2020: Last day to drop or add classes.

Please note that the honors college dean does not receive course evaluation scores for any course that does not have the HNRS prefix and does not receive narrative comments for any course through the university's course evaluation system. We welcome and encourage your feedback on honors courses. All comments should be directed via email to Anthony Helms.

A group of honors college students crouched around Walt Disney's star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Course Offerings:

ACTY 2110: Principles of Accounting II-HC

10153     TR     3:30 - 4:45 p.m.     1330 SCHDR     3 credit hours     William Kurtz
*Prerequisite: ACTY 2100 with a grade of “C” or better.
A study of the role of accounting information in the planning and decision-making of business organizations. The course focuses on financial analysis, manufacturing cost flows, budgeting, and planning for long-term financing and investing activities.

ANTH 1500: Race, Biology, and Culture - HC

14044     W     6:00 - 8:30 p.m.     1014 LHC     3 credit hours     Dimitrios Papadopoulos
*Note: This course satisfies General Education Area VII: Natural Science and Technology: Applications and Implications.
This course is an introduction to the anthropological study of human biological variation in modern populations. We will examine from a biocultural perspective how human populations adapt to life in difficult environments (e.g., tropics, high altitude, arctic) and in so doing, we will explore the biological and social meanings of human racial variation.

BIOS 1620: Ecology and Evolution - HC

13652     MWF     9:00 - 9:50 a.m.     1710 WOOD     4 credit hours     Doug Coulter
*Prerequisites: BIOS 1600 or CHEG 2960; with a grade of “C” or better in all prerequisites.
This course covers basic concepts of evolution and ecology, and addresses how the tremendous range of biological diversity on Earth arose, how different life forms interact with each other and with the physical environment, and the issues that threaten their future. This course can be taken as the second or third course in the required three-semester introductory biology sequence for majors and minors in the Biological Sciences Department.

BIOS 1620: Ecology and Evolution Lab - HC

13185     T     9:00 - 11:50 a.m.     2404 WOOD     0 credit hours     Staff
13188     W    2:00 - 4:50 p.m.      2404 WOOD     0 credit hours      Staff

BLS 3050: Intro to Adults with Disabilities - HC

12177    T     6:00 - 8:30 p.m.   4035 CHHS     3 credit hours     Jennipher Wiebold   
This course is intended to help students understand the impact of disability on the individual, in society, and to understand the contributions that can be made by persons with disabilities when they are accepted members of society. This course will present an overview of various disabilities, the services which have developed to help individuals function independently, and the capabilities of persons with disabilities. The student will gain an overview of medical aspects of disability, the demographics of disability, and issues relating to integration into society. The various components which make up independent functioning in our society will be examined as will the adjustment issues relating to disability. 

BUS 1750: Business Enterprise - HC (Hybrid)

12052     T     11:00 - 12:15 p.m.     1225 SCHDR     3 credit hours     Ann Gallagher
(Open to all honors college students.)  
*Note: Students will download a 75 minute video lecture each week that covers business theory and practice. During class meetings students will discuss concepts presented in the video lecture, work on team projects, and take quizzes and tests.
*Note: This course satisfies General Education Area V: Social and Behavioral Sciences.
This course introduces students to the development and value of business institutions in society. Students will examine the dynamics of business decision-making and demonstrate the ability to identify, define, and interpret essential business concepts. The relationships among business activities will be studied to determine their interactions with the economic, political, legal, global, and social environments.

Three female honors college students making Ws with their fingers.

BUS 2200: Intro to Global Business - HC

13230     MW     2:00 - 3:15 p.m.     1355 SCHDR     3 credit hours     Zahir Quraeshi
*Prerequisite: Sophomore standing.
An introduction to global business and its complex environment. Develop an understanding of relevant differences in the economic, sociopolitical, legal and ethical environment of global business. Realize how such differences can influence business functional operations such as production, marketing, management, information management, accounting and finance.

CHEM 1120: General Chemistry II - HC

10057     TR  3:30 - 4:45 p.m.    1720 CHEM      3 credit hours       Megan Grunert Kowalski
*Prerequisites: CHEM 1100 and CHEM 1110 (with a minimum grade of “C” or better in all prerequisites); and CHEM 1130 with a minimum grade of “C” or better (may be taken concurrently).
*Note: This section does not meet our standard 25 student cap, but is significantly smaller than non-honors sections.
The properties of a number of the more representative elements and the compounds which they form are studied. Chemical relationships in the periodic table, electrochemistry, and the equilibrium principle are also treated.

CHEM 1130: General Chemistry II Lab - HC

10783    W     8:00 - 10:50 a.m.     1831 CHEM     1 credit hour     Ramakrishna Guda
11608    W     2:00 - 4:50 p.m.       1831 CHEM     1 credit hour     Ramakrishna Guda
*Note: In addition to the cost of a three-credit class, there is a Chemistry Class Fee $75.00 Flat Fee
*Prerequisites: CHEM 1100 and CHEM 1110 (with a minimum grade of “C” or better in any prerequisites); and CHEM 1120 with a minimum grade of “C” or better (may be taken concurrently).
This is the companion laboratory course to CHEM 1120. This course is also intended for students who completed a general chemistry course without laboratory at another institution.

Cinderella Project volunteers holding up signs in front of a wall with paintings hung on it.

ECON 2020: Principles of Macroeconomics - HC

14267     TR  2:00 - 3:15 p.m.     1022 LHC     3 credit hours    Christine Moser
*Note: This course satisfies General Education Area V: Social and Behavioral Sciences.
*Note: For students who plan to take both ECON 2010 and ECON 2020, it is preferable to take ECON 2010 before taking ECON 2020.
An introduction to macroeconomics, the study of total output and employment, inflation, economic growth, and introduction to international trade and development.

ENGL 1050: Thought and Writing - HC

10887     TR     2:00 - 3:40 p.m.     3045 BROWN     4 credit hours     Adrienne Redding
*Prerequisite: Satisfactory ACT English score, or placement essay, or ENGL 1000.
* The following majors are restricted from taking this course: Pre-Business Administration (PRBA); Pre-Engineering (PREG); Pre-Aviation Flight Science (PRFL); Undecided: Pre-Business (UNBP).
*Note: This course satisfies General Education Proficiency 1: college-level writing course.

A writing course in which the students will work closely with the instructor to develop their sense of language as a means of shaping and ordering their experience and ideas, and to develop imagination, thought, organization, and clarity in their written work. This course does not count as credit towards English major or minor.  This course does fulfill the University Intellectual Skills college level writing requirement.

Garbage on a beach in New York.

ES 2800: Human Flourishing and the Pursuit of Happiness - HC

16190     MW     11:00 - 12:15 p.m.     1024 LHC     3 credit hours     Paul Farber
*Note: This course satisfies General Education Area II: Humanities. May be repeated for credit.
This course is designed to address the enduring question “What is Human Flourishing?” Drawing from philosophy, literature and the social sciences, we introduce students to conceptions, visions, and conditions of human flourishing, its changing nature across many periods of Western history, its manifold expressions in contemporary life, and its pursuit in the local community. This course is also an invitation to explore one’s own biases about what it is to flourish and achieve (or at least pursue) happiness.

GIST 2000: Introduction to Global and International Studies - HC

13922    TR     TBD     3 credit hours     Thomas Kostrzewa
*Note: This course satisfies General Education Area IV: Other Cultures and Civilizations.
Interdisciplinary introduction to global and international studies as an academic field of inquiry, with emphasis on historical development of the global system, global economy and society, environmental conditions and awareness, mass communications, technology and enterprise, response formats for global issues and intellectual and creative life. Explores the relationships between globalizing forces and the countervailing influences of regional and cultural identity.

GPS 1500: Intro to Graphic & Printing Sciences Lab - HC

12230     M     1:30 - 4:20 p.m.     TBD     0 credit hours     Lois Lemon
Lecture CRN is 12224 (4 credit hours, must be taken with lab)
Note: This course satisfies General Education Area VI: Natural Science with Laboratory.
An introductory course describing the printing/imaging industry. Image Design, preparation, generation, photo imaging by photomechanical and desktop systems, proofing, presswork, and bindery. A comparison of all printing methods will be included. Learning environment enhance by hands-on experience. 

GWS 1000: Media and the Sexes - HC

12020     TR     12:30 - 1:45 p.m.     2204 DUNBR     3 credit hours     Jennifer Richardson
*Note: This course satisfies General Education Area II: Humanities.
The course investigates how films, television, music videos and advertising present images of women and men to different audiences.

HIST 3020: World History to 1500 - HC

14808    MW     2:00  - 3:15 p.m.     3213 DUNBR     3 credit hours     Bryan Machin
*Note: This course satisfies General Education Area IV: Other Cultures and Civilizations.
Introduction to World History to 1500, intended for students of all majors. By “world history” is meant not the sum history of the world’s separate societies and culture, but major chapters in the history of the interaction between them. We will examine the ways in which societies contacted one another, the ways they influenced one another, and the ways new societies emerged, including the roles played by migration, trade, war, empire, technology, epidemic, and religious and cultural diffusion.

HNRS 2900: Canyons, Sites and Springs of the Desert Southwest

Application is required for this course.
3 credit hours     Dr. Jeffrey Jones
*Note: This course satisfies General Education Area III: The United States: Cultures and Issues.
This course is an engaging clockwise lap of the desert southwest and an exploration of culture, archaeology, and ecology. Punctuated by therapeutic soaks in hot springs, we visit the major sites of the Ancestral Pueblo (Anasazi), including Chaco Canyon, Canyon De Chelly, and Mesa Verde. We will study petroglyphs and pictographs, ride horses and hike to remote sites, and frequent remarkable desert mesas and vistas. We will learn through active engagement in an experiential, open road, instructional pedagogy. Dr. Jeffrey Jones would be happy to answer questions about the course.

HNRS 2900: U.S. Mexico Border Awareness Experience

Application is required for this course.
3 credit hours     Denise Bowen
*Note: This course satisfies General Education Area III: The United States: Cultures and Issues.
This course delves into the culture and the realities of life at the U.S./Mexico border. It will take place in El Paso, Texas - one of the main entry points into the U.S. for undocumented workers and refugees from Mexico and Central America seeking asylum. You will learn about all facets of migration. You will have the opportunity to tour the border fence, visit the Border Patrol Museum and a migrant farmworker's center. We hope to visit a detention center, meet with Border Patrol agents and observe immigration court proceedings. We will meet with human rights activists and local non-profit organizations providing legal services to immigrants and refugees. In the spirit of solidarity, we will be completely immersing ourselves in the border culture. That means spending time living and sharing meals with the volunteers and the immigrants and refugees who live in migrant hospitality houses and listening to their stories. Although Spanish language proficiency is not required, this would be a great chance to improve your Spanish skills! You may contact Denise Bowen for more information.

HNRS 3201: Art of the Book

13590    W    6:30 - 9:00 p.m.      1004 RCVA    3 credit hours      Jeffrey Abshear
*Note: This course satisfies General Education Area II: Humanities.
This course will cover the development of Western book production-the design, illustration, printing, and binding of manuscripts and printed texts from the early medieval period to the present. In addition, the course will include visits to the Kalamazoo Book Arts Center where students will participate in some basic bookmaking activities-papermaking, bookbinding, hand typesetting using movable type, and printing.A group of honors students in front of the Charles Wright Museum.

HNRS 3204: Postmodern Dystopias

13880     TR    12:00 – 1:40 p.m.      1024 LHC      4 credit hours       Becky Cooper
*Note: This course satisfies General Education Area II: Humanities.
Although no one questions that our contemporary world should be termed “postmodern,” there is no consensus on the precise meaning of the term. Two crucial and precipitous historical events arising from World War II, the birth of computers and the atom bomb, signal a precipitous break from the modern, and have radically transformed all facets of contemporary political, social, and personal life. Yet if our global world and engagement has been fully embraced and integrated within contemporary life, often celebrating the “singularity” of technology and everyday life in an age of “spiritual machines” when “computers exceed human intelligence” (Ray Kurzwell). a decidedly dystopic imagination dominates the arts of films and literature. This course, through the exploration of fiction and film from the past half a century, aims to explore the meaning, significance and implications of postmodern life and culture. The course seeks to foster a critical analysis of postmodernity through class discussions, student presentations, short response essays, and the completion of three substantial essays, including a research paper.

HNRS 3302: Civil Rights and Jazz 

13919     MW     10:00 - 11:40 a.m.     1014 LHC     4 credit hours     Elizabeth Cowan
*Note: This course satisfies General Education Area III: United States: Culture and Issues.
This course places special emphasis on American jazz form as a crucial influence and metaphor for the very rhythm and experience of modernity as it explores the interrelations between literature, music, and American culture through the music of Louis Armstrong, Fats Waller, and Duke Ellington among others.

HNRS 3303: Vietnam and Rock

14743     TR     10:00 - 11:40 a.m.     1014 LHC     4 credit hours     Steve Feffer
*Note: This course satisfies General Education Area III: United States: Culture and Issues.
This course explores the history, meaning, and impact of the 1960s through two crucial cultural events: the Vietnam War and Rock music. The course aims to explore both the history of the war as well as the cultural debates and changes that continue to resonate today.

HNRS 3701: Technology in the Arts

14005     TR     3:30 - 4:45 p.m.     1022 LHC     3 credit hours      Kevin Abbott
*Note: This course satisfies General Education Area VII: Natural Sciences and Technology: Applications and Implications.
*Note: Students are required to bring a laptop to class.

This class will explore the ongoing relationship between the fine arts and technology, with an emphasis on recent practices and emerging technologies. Students will learn how musicians, theatre artists, choreographers and visual artists have taken advantage of technology to meet their needs, and how technology has influenced and inspired them to explore new creative territory. Students will also learn how technology itself is often the subject of artistic work, and that the questions surrounding human interaction with technology have proven to be a provocative subject for artists. Students will see how media technology has empowered composers, choreographers, designers and directors to create entirely new experiences for live audiences, Students will learn about technologies which have impacted the fine arts in recent years including video projections, interactive sensors and systems, motion capture, MIDI, audio processing, 3D printing, and envision how emerging technologies might be used to support artistic endeavors in the near future.

HNRS 4102: Studies in Film: Film Adaptations         

13591     T     6:00 – 9:15 p.m.     1011 LHC     3 credit hours     Scott Myers    
*Note: This course satisfies General Education Area I: Fine Arts
The majority of films made in Hollywood are adaptations of other material. This course will study film adaptations in many forms: remakes, novels, short stories, theatrical plays, graphic novels, etc. Class will study the source material and then the adapted film paying special attention to the artistic form of each distinct medium and the choices artists make in adapting a work to the cinematic medium. Class work will include reading journals, tests, and a major paper.

HNRS 4980: How and Why to Write an Undergraduate Thesis        

13594       online                1 credit hour     Beth Beaudin-Seiler         
13645        online               1 credit hour     Beth Beaudin-Seiler       
13674        online               1 credit hour     Jared Randall      
14019        online               1 credit hour     Jared Randall      
This online course covers all aspects of preparing and completing an honors thesis. Included are modules on identifying a thesis topic, conducting a literature review, citing sources, finding a thesis committee, structuring the thesis, and defending the thesis.

An honors college graduate being corded by his friend.

HOL 2801: Health and Well Being – HC

12623     T     4:00 – 6:30 p.m.     1014 LHC     3 credit hours     Richard Szwaja   
*Note: This course satisfies General Education Area VIII: Health and Well-Being.
This course is designed to provide information on the multiple dimensions of health and well-being. This course provides students with a holistic approach to understanding self and community through a health focus. This course is designed around three central themes: self-care, community, and culture. Students will engage in a variety of activities which will foster critical thinking skills and personal exploration. Students exposed to theory and practice in the following areas: self-care and well-being, culture, research, and health broadly defined and encompassing psychological, physical, spiritual, environmental, social health.

MATH 1230: Calculus II-HC                 

See Course Lookup
*Note: In addition to the cost of a three credit class, there is a Mathematics Class Fee $15.00 Flat Fee
*Note: A graphing calculator is required.
*Prerequisite: MATH 1220 (recommended) or MATH 1700.
A continuation of Calculus I. Techniques and applications of integration, trigonometric functions, sequences and series, indeterminate forms, improper integrals, applications to elementary differential equations.

Three female students holding a Scrabble tropy.MATH 1710: Calculus II Science & Engineering-HC            

See Course Lookup
*Prerequisite: MATH 1700 (recommended) or (MATH 1220 and departmental approval).
*Note: Students who take more than one of MATH 1220, 1700, or 2000 will receive only 4 hours of credit toward graduation. This course satisfies General Education Proficiency 4: Mathematics or Quantitative Reasoning.
A continuation of MATH 1700, with further applications and preparation for science and engineering. Techniques of integration, more on trigonometric functions, sequences and series, indeterminate forms, improper integrals, and more on elementary differential equations.

MGMT 2500: Organizational Behavior-HC

10266     TR     12:30 - 1:45 p.m.    1350 SCHDR     3 credit hours     Paula Eckert
* Prerequisite: BUS 1750
* Restrictions: This course is restricted to majors/minors across multiple departments. Please see advisor for specific program restrictions.
* Restricted to majors/minors across multiple departments. Please see advisor for specific program restrictions.
This course provides an examination of individual, interpersonal, group, and organization processes faced by employees. Current theory, research, and practice regarding variables that influence human behavior are discussed. Emphasis is placed on learning relevant to goal setting, managing change, team processes, reward structures, human productivity, and career management in organization settings.

PHIL 2010: Intro to Ethics-HC

16088     TR     12:00 - 1:40 p.m.     4206 DUNBR     4 credit hours     Ashley Atkins
*Note: This course satisfies General Education Area II: Humanities.
An introduction to the philosophic study of morality. Deals with questions such as: What is the good life? Why should I be moral? What is the meaning of right and wrong?

PHIL 3340: Biomedical Ethics-HC

16091     TR     2:00 - 3:15 p.m.     G0111 MOORE     4 credit hours     David Charlton
*Note: This course satisfies General Education Area VII: Natural Science and Technology: Applications and Implications.
In this course, the ethical principles (respect for autonomy, non maleficence, beneficence justice) and other ethical concerns (e.g. privacy, confidentiality, compassion, relationships among patients and professionals) are studied and applied to contemporary problems in medicine and biomedical research. These problems include genetic testing and therapy; organ transplantation; decision-making regarding treatment and care at the end of life; research involving human subjects; and treatment issues in the AIDS epidemic. Case study methods are used.

A group of student volunteers standing in front of Gibbs house holding vegetables harvested from the garden.

PSY 1400: Introduction to Behavior Analysis-HC       

12264        TR     10:00 - 11:40 a.m.     2209 DUNBR     4 credit hours     Kelly Kohler
Provides the foundation for many of the other courses in the Psychology major, by introducing students to the principles of conditioning and learning, and behavior analysis concepts that can be applied to clinical, counseling, school, experimental, child, sports, community, and industrial psychology, as well as autism, psychoses, anorexia, phobia, ethics, religion, gender, procrastination, sexual behavior, drug use, speech pathology, developmental disabilities, social work, special education, behavioral medicine, animal training, juvenile corrections, and everyday life.

PSY 1600: Child Psychology-HC

15042     TR     12:30 – 1:45 p.m.     2205 DUNBR     3 credit hours     Scott Gaynor
*Prerequisite: PSY 1000 with a grade of “C” or better.
An introduction to behavior principles in the analysis of complex behavior with an emphasis upon early childhood learning and the techniques for enhancing children’s development. Topics include mental retardation, behavioral problems in childhood, emotional development and language learning.

A group of honors students on a boat in front of the Statue of Liberty. STAT 2160: Business Statistics-HC

10751     MWF     9:00 - 9:50 a.m.     2110 SANGN     3 credit hours      Elisha Hall
*Prerequisite: MATH 1160 or MATH 1180 or MATH 1220 or MATH 1230 or MATH 2000; with a grade of “C” or better.
*Note: This course satisfies General Education Proficiency 4: Mathematics or Quantitative Reasoning.
An applications-oriented study of statistical concepts and techniques. The course focuses on the student as a user of statistics who needs a minimal understanding of mathematical theory and formula derivation. Major topics of study are statistical description, central tendency, dispersion, distributional shapes, sampling, confidence levels, probability, comparison tests, association tests, and regression analysis. The objectives of the course are to develop the skill to apply these concepts in conjunction with computer usage and make appropriate decisions regarding actual business problems. All STAT 2160 students are expected to take the final exam on the assigned mass exam day.

STAT 3660: Data Analysis for Biosciences-HC

13009     MW     2:00 - 3:40 p.m.     2303 KOHRM     4 credit hours     Carrie McKean
*Note: This course satisfies General Education Proficiency 3: College-Level Mathematics or Quantitative Reasoning.
*Prerequisite: MATH 1100 or MATH 1110 with a grade of “C” or better; or the equivalent or satisfactory score on the departmental placement exam.
An introduction to statistics for students in the biological and related sciences with an emphasis on the basic concepts and explanations of why things work. The focus is on quantitative reasoning and statistical thinking for making decisions and conjectures. This numerical art will be illustrated with a wide range of interesting problems. Topics include descriptive statistics like means, medians, standard deviation, percentiles; correlation and regression - interpretation and prediction problems; the normal and binomial distributions; law of averages; sampling variability and standard errors; inferential statistics to -confidence intervals and tests of hypotheses for one- and two-sample problems.

Experiential Credits

ED 4700: Intern Teaching: Early Childhood                                      

Various     Varies     5 credit hours     Staff
*Note: In addition to the cost of a five credit class, there is a Student Liability-Education $5.00 Flat Fee
*Restriction: This course is restricted to the following major(s): Early Childhood Prof Educ (ECEJ); Early Childhood Education (ECEM); Early Childhood (ECEN); Early Childhood & Elem Educ (EEEN)
Only for seniors who have been admitted to teacher education. This internship is required a semester or session prior to the full semester internship. This experience consists of five half-days per week in a fall or spring semester or five full days per week in a summer session in a pre-kindergarten program. Students will synthesize the knowledge, apply the understandings, and practice the skills which they acquired during University course work. They will participate in all phases of the school program where they are assigned. To be undertaken concurrently with ED 4090.

ED 4710: Intern Teaching: Elem/Mid School

Various     Varies     4 credit hours     Staff
*Note: In addition to the cost of a four credit class, there is a Student Liability-Education $5.00 Flat Fee
*Restriction: This course is restricted to certain majors. Please see the course listing online for a complete list.
*Prerequisites: All other courses and program requirements must be completed prior to Intern Teaching.
*Note: All sections count for honors college credit.
This course is only for seniors who have been admitted to teacher education and have completed all of their professional studies courses. This will be the final field experience consisting of five days per week in an educational setting. Students will synthesize the knowledge, apply the understandings, and practice the skills which they acquired during their University course work. They will participate in all phases of the school program where they are assigned. To be taken concurrently with ED 4100. Prerequisites: All other courses and program requirements must be completed prior to Intern Teaching.Students having lunch with an alumnus while on the Disney Study in the States trip.

ED 4750: Intern Teaching: Mid/Sec School

Various     Varies     5 credit hours     Staff
*Note: In addition to the cost of a five credit class, there is a Student Liability-Education $5.00 Flat Fee
*Restriction: This course is restricted to certain majors. Please see the course listing online for a complete list.
*Note: All sections count for honors college credit.
Students devote a minimum of five days per week for one semester to intern teaching. They are expected to have experience in both the curricular and extra-curricular programs of the school in which they teach.

ENGR 2980: Cooperative Education

Arranged     3 credit hours
*The following classes are restricted from taking this course: Freshman.
A parallel cooperative education program or internship; involves part-time planned and supervised work experience related to a student's major during a semester. A written report of the student's work activities will be required.

ENGR 2990: Cooperative Education

Arranged     3 credit hours
*The following classes are restricted from taking this course: Freshman, Sophomore.
A parallel cooperative education program or internship; involves part-time planned and supervised work experience related to a student's major during a semester. A written report of the student's work activities will be required.

ENGR 3980: Cooperative Education

Arranged     3 credit hours
*The following classes are restricted from taking this course: Freshman, Sophomore.
A parallel cooperative education program or internship; involves part-time planned and supervised work experience related to a student's major during a semester. A written report of the student's work activities will be required.

ENGR 3990: Cooperative Education

Arranged     3 credit hours
*The following classes are restricted from taking this course: Freshman, Sophomore.
A parallel cooperative education program or internship; involves part-time planned and supervised work experience related to a student's major during a semester. A written report of the student's work activities will be required.

HNRS 3990: Field Experience Practicum

Various     Varies     Variable credit hours           
**For course registration, complete the Agreement Form.

Students standing in front of the Golden Gate Bridge on the Disney Study in the States trip. HNRS 4950: Individual Study

Variable credit hours
**For course registration, complete the Agreement Form.

HNRS 4990: Honors College Thesis

Variable credit hours
**For course registration, complete the Registration Form.

Other Ways to Earn Honors Credit

In addition to the courses listed above, there are many other ways to earn honors credit. Please see below for options according to whether you have a course requirement (joined the honors college prior to the 2014-15 academic year) or credit hour requirement (joined honors college fall 2014 or after). If you are unsure about your specific requirements, please refer to your original requirements letter.

Course Requirement - The following options may count for ONE (1) honors course

  • One field experience or independent study. Visit the the website for more information.
  • Two semesters of a foreign language or American Sign Language. Courses must be taken at WMU after you become a member of the honors college.
  • Two semesters of a music ensemble, dance performance or theatre practicum resulting in academic credit on your transcript.
  • Any study abroad experience that results in academic credit on your transcript.

Credit hour requirement - Up to half of your honors course credit requirement may be satisfied with the options listed below. Students receive experiential honors credits via an approved internship/field experience or independent study for honors credits. Please note that to receive credit for internship/field experience or independent study, the appropriate approval form must be submitted PRIOR to initiation of the experience. It is possible to receive honors credit for more than one field experience or independent study with prior approval by the honors college dean or associate dean. Approval will only be granted if the experiences are substantially different.

  • Independent study, field experience, co-op, internships and clinicals that result in academic credit on your transcript.
  • Four honors credits will be given for two semesters of the same foreign language. May be repeated for additional honors credit for additional foreign language(s). However, no additional honors credit will be given if a student takes more than two semesters of the same language.
  • Honors credit may be awarded for approved non-honors experiential courses in dance, music or theater as well as for participation in a varsity sports course. Up to three credits may be counted toward honors credit hour requirements and these may be accrued by repeating a course, or by taking multiple approved courses. Please see an honors college advisor for details.
  • Study abroad credits appearing on a student's WMU transcript, whether for a WMU course or a course run through another institution, will be counted as honors credit, up to a limit of 3 credits per semester. Multiple study abroad experiences may count for additional honors credit with honors college advisor, associate dean or dean approval.