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  • Nov. 15, 2020, Classes to go virtual Wednesday with other new safety measures

    Dear WMU community,

     

    This evening, Gov. Gretchen Whitmer announced a new emergency order from the Michigan Department of Health and Human Services—MDHHS. It enacts a three-week pause targeting indoor social gatherings and other group activities in an effort to curb the rapidly rising COVID-19 infection rate. The order is effective Wednesday, Nov. 18, at 12:01 a.m. and runs through Tuesday, Dec. 8, at 11:59 p.m. and could be extended.

    The emergency order has the following impacts on WMU's course delivery and operations for the duration of the order, unless otherwise specified.

    • All classes will be delivered via distance instruction. This accelerates by three days WMU's plan to move nearly all in-person instruction to distance education. Starting Wednesday, only classes involving health care programs may continue to be offered in person if they cannot be conducted via distance education.
    • WMUx will assist faculty members in developing strategies for continuing instruction remotely in those courses that had planned to continue in person for the full semester and that do not involve health care.
    • Students who are working at internships or externships should follow the direction and policies at their location to continue their work.
    • All WMU employees who can perform their duties remotely will do so to the maximum extent possible. This will be the case for the vast majority of WMU staff. In some cases, work duties cannot be done remotely. In those instances, safety precautions will continue to be enforced. Your manager/supervisor is your point of contact for questions about work arrangements.
    • Indoor gatherings may only occur in the residence halls. These gatherings must adhere to posted distancing requirements and are limited to students from no more than two different rooms or suites.
    • Other than the provision directly above, residence hall operations are not affected by this order.
    • Outdoor gatherings are limited to 25.
    • All RSOs will meet virtually and club sports are postponed for the duration of the order.
    • Indoor eating is permitted in WMU Dining Services if diners are seated at tables and are 6 feet apart. Members of a household (roommates or suitemates) may share a table. Tables must be spaced a minimum of 6 feet apart. Grab-n-go services will continue as indicated at dining locations.
    • Sindecuse Health Center’s drive-thru testing event has been extended to begin tomorrow, Monday, Nov. 16, and run through Thursday, Nov. 19. The state’s chief medical executive, Dr. Joneigh Khaldun, stressed the importance of continuing to conduct COVID-19 testing. Schedule your test by calling (269) 387-3287. Students who get tested during the testing event will receive a $5 certificate to spend at participating downtown businesses.
    • All campus research and creative scholarship that has a vice president for research and innovation-approved safety plan remains unaffected by this emergency order; this includes graduate and undergraduate work, including students working in research labs. To be clear, laboratory courses will not meet in person.
    • Waldo Library will remain open but at a reduced capacity.
    • In accordance with the order, the Student Recreation Center will remain open for individual exercise, however, group fitness classes are prohibited.
    • Public transit is permitted under the order.

    The rapid rise of cases combined with cold weather and the anticipated holidays are a concerning mix of factors that can make our current situation worse. We've proven this semester we know what to do; let's continue to do it.

    Be smart. Be safe. Be Broncos.

     

    Sincerely,

    Edward Montgomery
    President

  • Nov. 13, 2020, Start enhanced social distancing today as part of Thanksgiving planning

    Dear WMU community,

     

    We are now just a little less than 14 days before Thanksgiving. As we all think about how to gather with those we love, now is the time to take action to do that safely. This is especially important given that our trends are headed in the wrong direction. We are seeing a concerning rise of COVID-19 cases that are burdening health care systems across Michigan and right here in Kalamazoo County. Cases here at Western began to rise right after Halloween. We must work to flatten the curve. 

    Your unremitting dedication to all the related coronavirus safety practices is crucial. We join Gov. Gretchen Whitmer and the Michigan Department of Health and Human Services in calling for enhanced social distancing. Limit the places you go when you leave home to just the essentials—such as class, work, grocery runs and health care services. 

    Here are simple things you can do to get us back on track and ensure a safe Thanksgiving for your loved ones.

    • Please take advantage of rapid-result testing available through Sindecuse Health Center. On Nov. 18 and 19, the health center is offering drive-thru testing by appointment. Schedule your test by calling (269) 387-3287. Don’t risk inadvertently transmitting the virus to others—your best friend, your dad or your grandmother over the Thanksgiving table. 
    • Rethink those “Friendsgiving” plans. If you are exposed today or later, you can be asymptomatic and take coronavirus home. 
    • Limit your movement outside your home to only what is essential.

    As we continue to monitor our environment, we're not seeing the rise in transmissions occurring as a result of activities in classrooms or work settings, where individuals are following safety protocols. The rise is disproportionately happening as a result of social gatherings.

    Previously, close contact lists of COVID-19-positive students had typically been less than 10. But we are now seeing close contact lists of around 25 people or more—usually a list of others who were at a party. So, if you had plans to attend or host a party this weekend, think two weeks into the future and cancel those plans. The University's Student Code of Conduct office has been busy investigating and issuing hundreds of violations for disregarding safety rules.

    Our COVID-19 case dashboard shows a continued trajectory of escalating cases within the WMU community. Compared to the last seven-day period reported, we’ve gone up to 141 new cases versus 109 new cases in the last report. And 12.9% of tested individuals have tested positive for the virus compared to 11.4%.

    We must return to the things we know how to do to curb the spread of this virus. Individual decisions are the most powerful tools we have at our disposal. It’s within our power to flatten the curve. We may be getting tired of the coronavirus, but the virus has not nearly tired of us.

    Be smart. Be safe. Be Broncos.

     

    Sincerely,

    Kara Wood
    Associate Vice President for Community Partnerships
    COVID-19 Response Coordination Team chair

    Gayle Ruggiero, M.D.
    Medical Director
    COVID-19 Response Coordination Team co-chair

    Lt. Andrew Bachmann
    WMU Department of Public Safety, Emergency Management
    COVID-19 Response Coordination Team co-chair

  • Nov. 6, 2020, COVID-19 update: Your continued vigilance is required

    Dear WMU community,

     

    Our medical director, Dr. Gayle Ruggiero, recently sent a campuswide message reporting COVID-19 cases within the WMU community were trending downward, and she encouraged all of us to keep up the habits known to slow the spread of the infection. I want to thank everyone who has made efforts to help keep our campus safe and reduce our incidence of new cases. We have demonstrated that we know what to do and we are willing to do it. Thanks to committed faculty, staff and administrators and their comprehensive planning over the summer months, we resumed classes this fall positioned for safety and for fulfilling our educational mission. Thanks to our students who have abided by science- and expert-based health guidance.

    We have received a reminder of just how important these steps are, that even a modest slip in vigilance has consequences, almost immediately. On today’s updated COVID-19 case dashboard, you’ll find an uptick that shows 52 new cases in the latest seven-day period. This follows five weeks of decreasing cases. We suddenly have new case clusters that have emerged from social gatherings and other large group interactions recently. What happened? Halloween parties, in some instances.

    I'm writing today to underscore the call for vigilance in light of this new data. It’s time for redoubled awareness and attention. Off campus and on, we must maintain around-the-clock compliance with wearing a mask, maintaining at least 6 feet of physical distance from others and frequently washing hands.

    COVID-19 is currently surging across the nation, in our state and in the local community. That does not have to be the case here. This is a caring campus. Strict adherence to COVID-19-conscious practices demonstrates your concern for your fellow Broncos and all those with whom you interact. We have shown we know what to do, and we know it can and does work. Another healthy step you can take is to get tested before joining family and friends for the Thanksgiving holiday. Sindecuse Health Center is offering drive-thru testing, by online appointment, on Nov. 18 and 19. Details for how to sign up are available on our website.

    As we near Thanksgiving and the final weeks of the semester, it's useful to reflect on how we've been doing broadly and where we are going from here. We have managed this pandemic together by everyone doing their part—and stepping up for each other.

    Albeit operating very differently in some respects, our community is pressing on across campus—finding ways to teach and learn effectively across modalities, advancing knowledge in our research and creative activity, earning grants and scholarships, and providing and engaging in the cocurricular activities that round out college life. Our housing is confronting and overcoming the various challenges associated with providing students a home away from home in the time of a pandemic. Sindecuse is delivering the elevated care needed to conduct hundreds of COVID-19 tests weekly while continuing their core services, as well.

    In line with our pre-fall planning, we remain on track to move to nearly all virtual classes after Nov. 20. Thereafter, aside from Nov. 26 and 27, campus remains open and operating through Dec. 19 with few exceptions (students will be off for Thanksgiving recess, Nov. 23 through Nov. 27).

    On the final day of the semester, Dec. 19, some 1,400 students are set to graduate. I'm pleased to announce we are planning virtual commencement ceremonies to celebrate our talented students as newly minted alumni. We are excited to offer these virtual experiences and will soon share more details. For April and June 2020 graduates, we are still committed to offering an in-person commencement ceremony as soon as we possibly can do so.

    Our community continues to be replete with accomplishment. We do well when we pause and take stock. A few additional examples:

    • Dr. June Gothberg, assistant professor in the College of Education and Human Development, was recently invited by the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights to give a presentation to the members of the Working Group on Gender Equality, Disability and Human Rights.
    • Dr. Kelley O'Reilly, interim chair and associate professor in the Department of Marketing, has been named recipient of the 2019-20 MAC Outstanding Faculty Award for Student Success.
    • Ky'Aria Moses, a second-year master’s student in the behavior analysis program, won the National Institute of Effective Instruction’s Cooper & Andronis Scholarship.
    • Eddie Codrington, saxophonist, composer and two-time graduate, has been named the ASCAP Foundation’s Johnny Mandel Prize winner. The foundation also bestowed him with its Herb Alpert Young Jazz Composer Award for the second year in a row.

    Here's a metric to reflect on: 10,000. That's the number of personal phone calls staff and leadership within academic affairs, diversity and inclusion, and student affairs are collectively making to check in on students. As the days get colder and hours of daylight lessen, the mental health of our students is on our mind. This is one example of how Broncos are still supporting each other's well-being. Those who would like to volunteer to call students, please reach out to Katie Easley at katie.e.easley@wmich.edu. Students, if you are struggling, I encourage you to contact Sindecuse, which offers mental health services. Keep yourself well, and check in on your friends. Faculty and staff, please remember the Employee Assistance Program is here for you.

    Despite the challenges we face individually and collectively, our community continues to be there for each other. Together, we persevere, and, together, we are making an appreciable difference. Thank you for doing your part.

     

    Sincerely,

    Edward Montgomery
    President

  • Oct. 27, 2020, COVID-19 testing event Nov. 18 and 19 ahead of Thanksgiving recess

    Dear WMU students, faculty and staff,

     

    Months into the pandemic and several weeks into the fall semester, we are seeing adherence to practices, known to curb novel coronavirus spread, making a difference in the WMU community. For the last few weeks, the positivity rate has declined while Sindecuse Health Center consistently administers some 200 tests daily. The trend is moving in the right direction, but it's up to all of us to continue that trajectory. To stay informed about the incidence of the virus in our community, visit the University's COVID-19 Case Dashboard.

    Vigilance is particularly crucial as we approach the end of nearly all in-person classes after Nov. 20 and begin the Thanksgiving recess the following week, Nov. 23 to Nov. 27. While campus buildings and offices remain open through the end of the fall semester on Dec. 19, many may take the transition to distance education or the holiday as an opportunity to return to home communities and reunite with loved ones. No one wants to carry the virus back home. To continue protecting family, friends and yourself, do not let up on wearing your mask, maintaining 6 feet of physical distance and washing your hands frequently. That's how we are mitigating virus exposure and transmission.

    As an extra precaution ahead of the Thanksgiving recess, you can also take advantage of an upcoming testing event. On Nov. 18 and 19, the health center will offer drive-thru testing by appointment. These special testing times are available to enrolled WMU students, faculty and staff members only. If students, faculty or staff have NOT used their two no-cost tests under the University's testing provisions, this test will be administered at no charge. Eligible individuals who already received two asymptomatic, no-exposure tests will have their insurance billed first. Without insurance, a test costs $50 out of pocket. You must make your appointment online for this testing event. Find additional details on Sindecuse Health Center's website.

    We want you, your loved ones and campus to remain healthy and safe, Broncos. Don't ever forgo safety practices—even after a negative test result—as a test is a snapshot in time.

    If you are currently experiencing respiratory symptoms, cough, headache, shortness of breath, fever or other symptoms associated with COVID-19, or if you have been exposed to a positive case, call (269) 387-3287 to schedule an appointment with a provider at Sindecuse today.

     

    Thank you,

    Gayle Ruggiero, M.D. 
    Medical Director and COVID-19 Response Coordination Team co-chair

  • Oct. 5, 2020, WMU mask policy, other COVID-19 safety protocols remain in effect

    Dear WMU community,

    With the Michigan Supreme Court's decision Friday to strike down Gov. Gretchen Whitmer's current use of emergency powers to enforce COVID-19-associated regulations, you may be wondering what impact this ruling has on Western Michigan University's own safety policies and protocols.

    Acting under its independent authority granted by the state's constitution and continuing to follow public health guidance, WMU will maintain and enforce the University's COVID-19-related safety rules. These include our facial covering policy, as well as measures detailed on the Safe Return website and the COVID-19 response website.

    Moreover, the Michigan Department of Health and Human Services late today issued an emergency order mirroring many of the major health and safety mandates in the governor’s COVID-19 executive orders, such as the use of masks and limiting the size of gatherings. The University also continues to work closely with the Kalamazoo County Health and Community Services Department in our response to the pandemic. Wearing a mask, physical distancing, washing one's hands frequently and restricting the size of gatherings all help prevent exposure and spread of the virus, according to these public health officials.

    Please stay the course in following COVID-19-conscious practices. Every member of the WMU community plays a vital role in creating and sustaining a healthy campus. Thank you for continuing to do your part.

    Sincerely,

    Kara Wood
    Associate Vice President for Community Partnerships
    COVID-19 Response Coordination Team chair

    Lt. Andrew Bachmann
    WMU Department of Public Safety, Emergency Management
    COVID-19 Response Coordination Team co-chair

    Gayle Ruggiero, M.D.
    Medical Director
    COVID-19 Response Coordination Team co-chair

  • Sept. 21, 2020, COVID-19 dashboard enhancements, operational contingencies

    Dear campus community,

    We have effectively managed to reopen in-person operations, and our community is two and a half weeks into the new school year. We are solving problems as they arise and adapting as we find new and better ways to manage in this unprecedented time.

    With some experts estimating a full national recovery from the pandemic as far as a year away, we have come to understand our circumstance as a marathon, not a sprint. Our planning is framed by the assumption that the effects of the pandemic could continue to extend for a long and undeterminable duration. I hope I am wrong, but hope is not a strategy. We must be realistic about what we face and flexible in how we adapt to shifting circumstances. Being practical means we must frame our thinking accordingly. Instead of considering our large university as one monolithic entity with a single, predetermined course, we must use our heterogeneity to our advantage in crafting solutions and responses to the crisis. The faculty have already been doing this in developing courses with five modalities to fit the educational circumstances in their respective departments. All buildings and units have unique operational plans placing safety first, yet crafted to fit individual circumstances. By thinking in multifaceted, non-binary terms, at a micro, not macro scale, we have also deployed targeted solutions that allow for safe continuity of University operations. This is the thinking that has informed our Response and Recovery Plan, which can be found on the Safe Return Plan website.

     

    Response and Recovery Plan
    The Response and Recovery Plan provides a framework for decision-making as we continuously assess the latest COVID-19 data about our community. It takes a matrix approach to establish operating phases that rise and fall based on six key factors: community spread, trends in COVID-19 cases on campus, hospital admissions, contact tracing and isolation resources, test availability and the availability of Personal Protective Equipment, or PPE. The University’s levels of service in instruction, research, cocurricular and administrative functions, whether they are in-person or virtual, are guided by the operational phase and determined by the relevant division leader in consultation with the President, President’s Cabinet and division stakeholders as appropriate.

    I appreciate the thoughtful counsel and good work of the Contingency Planning Task Force, chaired by Dr. Terri Goss Kinzy, vice president for research and innovation. The full list of contributors to this effort can be found on page three of the plan, and we owe them all a debt of gratitude.

    So, where do we stand today in relation to the plan? Our current status is Phase 2. We have no hospital admissions, and there are sufficient PPE, testing, contact tracing and isolation resources. Total incidence of COVID-19 cases at WMU is 0.7% of the population, with 165 active cases, as of the end of the day Friday, Sept. 19, among a total student, faculty and staff population of 23,353.

    However, community spread is a factor that we continue to watch carefully. We assess our data at regularly scheduled meetings between WMU’s COVID-19 Response Coordination team leaders and our county health officials. At its most recent meeting, the group concluded that we are seeing evidence of increasing disease transmission among WMU students. This is what we might expect following our campus return and the Labor Day holiday, as there is still communitywide disease transmission in our county. The majority of the positive cases seem to be stemming from off-campus living situations and off-campus social gatherings.

    While this trend has our attention, we also understand that it is consistent with what our local officials have seen in the general community. They are finding that individuals throughout Kalamazoo County are not necessarily being exposed while at work or school, as there are strict public health risk mitigation measures in those settings. The exposure is most often happening in informal social gatherings where people are not as vigilant about following public health precautions.

    I cannot overemphasize how critical it is that everyone take individual ownership and responsibility to avoid these parties and gatherings, consistently practice social distancing and wear a mask. These are the keys that will determine how much of our University will remain open without disruption. The data shows we must do better if we hope to maintain or improve our current operating status.

    If you are interested in additional insight, the Kalamazoo County Health and Community Services Department has provided an assessment of our current status. We will continue to work with them and monitor the data.


    Testing Availability at Sindecuse Health Center
    The testing protocol at Sindecuse provides a good example of our flexible plan at work. Sindecuse had a handful of days where staff determined that capacity was not sufficient. I, along with other campus leaders, learned about wait-time concerns. Before we could call on Sindecuse to address the matter, the staff was already working on a solution. The center has added nurses to its staff and is hiring more, and it increased its contact tracing capacity. There are expanded hours for testing, and the staff has adapted policies and practices to expedite appointments and increase daily testing volume. Through these measures, Sindecuse has more than doubled its testing capability without delay.

    We understand that there may be some confusion about scheduling. When scheduling a test, please remember:

    • There is more testing capacity than is indicated in the patient portal for COVID-19 symptomatic or exposed individuals. So, those who are symptomatic or believe they have been exposed should complete their daily health survey accordingly, then make an appointment. If a timely appointment cannot be made through the online patient portal, call Sindecuse at (269) 387-3287.
    • Tests are most effective five or more days after exposure. So, while a patient may want an immediate test and result, it is important to allow sufficient time to pass for an accurate test result.

    To most effectively manage demand and need, Sindecuse has been prioritizing symptomatic or exposed individuals for testing, as assessed by a Sindecuse health provider. This helps us target testing where it is most critical in identifying those with the virus.

    Other examples of flexible responses to the pandemic include a cluster of cases found in one academic program several weeks ago. A three-day shutdown allowed for cleaning and safety assessment. The program was back up and running quickly with no further issues. We also had a cluster of cases among nine student athletes in four sports. We suspended practice and established aggressive distancing precautions until we could fully assess the situation.

    We will continue to monitor data, assess and adapt. Thank you to those who have sent questions and identified concerns. You are always welcome to reach out to me, and I encourage you to continue to send questions and concerns to info@wmich.edu. Working together, we can continue to provide the best possible, yet safe University experience for our students.

    Sincerely,

    Edward Montgomery
    President

  • Sept. 4, 2020, Update: Testing availability, data and other updates

    Dear WMU Community,

    Congratulations on completing the first week of fall semester. In any academic year, acclimating to a new semester after a long recess can take a few days. This year has the additional challenge of learning how to operate as an on-campus community amid a global pandemic. Together, we're doing it for the worthwhile purpose of delivering or receiving WMU's quality educational experience while following safety precautions. Thank you for your contributions to making this semester one that is healthy, safe and full of learning opportunities and achievements.

    We also come to you today with another roundup of reminders and important new information for you to know. The latest:

    Additional no-cost COVID-19 tests: Students asked. Leaders listened. WMU is now offering one additional no-cost test for faculty, staff and students who are not exhibiting symptoms of COVID-19 but still want to be tested. Asymptomatic individuals can now receive a total of two rapid-result antigen tests for no out-of-pocket cost.

    WMU faculty, staff and students also receive a no-cost test if they have COVID-19 symptoms, answered "yes" to any of the questions on the daily self-monitoring survey or were directed to be tested as a close contact of an infected individual.

    It's important to understand that a COVID-19 test is a snapshot in time. An asymptomatic person who tests negative for the novel coronavirus must still continue to follow all the related health and safety precautions—consistently wearing a mask, social distancing in the presence of others, frequent hand-washing and staying home when ill. Tests are most accurate five days or more after exposure to a positive person, but they do not negate the need for continued quarantine.

    COVID-19 Case Dashboard: To stay informed about the incidence of COVID-19 among WMU community members, continue to visit the COVID-19 Case Dashboard on the University's Safe Return website. Individuals who have a confirmed case of the virus should isolate until a health care provider gives them clearance to circulate again among members of the general public.

    Bronco Student Pledge: We appreciate the overwhelming support for the Bronco Student Pledge—98.9% of students have so far affirmed the pledge, agreeing to follow all of the University's COVID-19-related health and safety requirements for the well-being of all members of the WMU community. Members of the President's Cabinet also have taken the pledge.

    Mask use: There has been some confusion about where one should wear a mask or a facial covering on campus. Please wear a mask indoors and outdoors when physical distancing is not possible. For instance, if you are outside and consistently beyond 6 feet from others, it's permissible to take your mask off. When you are within 6 feet of others outside, however, your mask should be covering your nose and mouth.

    As we move through this atypical semester together, we should continue to extend grace and gratitude to each other. Successfully navigating a new life experience often takes resilience, which, in turn, helps to build resilience. That's how Broncos thrive and prosper.

    Please continue to visit the Safe Return website and COVID-19 website for resources and information.

    Be smart. Be safe. Be Broncos.

    Sincerely,

    Kara Wood
    Associate Vice President for Community Partnerships
    COVID-19 Response Coordination Team chair

    Gayle Ruggiero, M.D.
    Medical Director
    COVID-19 Response Coordination Team co-chair

    Lt. Andrew Bachmann
    WMU Department of Public Safety, Emergency Management
    COVID-19 Response Coordination Team co-chair

  • Sept. 2, 2020, Fall semester welcome from President Montgomery
    Video of 8GohCDTEU4k

    Dear WMU student,

    Welcome to your first day of classes!

    Each new year brings excitement as well as some hesitation over what lies ahead. Whether you're a longtime Bronco or a new student, it's all the more challenging today, given the COVID-19 pandemic. You have already received lots of helpful information, and I would like to keep it simple with five key pieces of information for you to use as classes begin:

    1. Take the self-monitoring health survey daily before arriving on campus.
    2. Know your COVID-19-conscious behaviors and expectations, including the updated WMU Student Code of Conduct, spelling out the consequences for ignoring or violating health and safety guidelines on or off campus.
    3. It takes everybody for our Safe Campus Strategy to work.
    4. Check the Safe Return Plan first—it has answers to many common questions.
    5. Find support when you need it.

    Also know that employees in many student-facing offices are now physically back on campus to serve you. Office hours and general operations may differ from previous semesters, so check the office hours website or call the offices before visiting them.

    By working together to keep everyone healthy and engaged through social distancing, using face coverings, hand-washing and using common sense, we’ll have a great year. I’ll see you soon.

    Be smart. Be safe. Be Broncos.

    Sincerely,

    Edward Montgomery
    President

  • Aug. 28, 2020, WMU's Safe Campus Strategy and the COVID-19 Case Dashboard

    Dear WMU community,

    Thanks to all who joined us for Wednesday's Back to Campus Briefings, where President Montgomery and others reviewed the University's Safe Campus Strategy, the health and safety portion of our Safe Return Plan.

    Some highlights:

    • COVID-19 case counts will be posted in a dashboard on the Safe Return Plan website each Friday—beginning today;
    • Section 14 (Harm to persons) of the Student Code of Conduct has been updated to include sanctions for violating COVID-19 safety rules related to off-campus activities; and
    • All students, faculty and staff are required to complete a daily health survey before arriving on campus and may be asked to show clearance status to a supervisor, faculty member, Sindecuse Health Center staff member or others through the survey's badging system.

    It's useful to think of our Safe Campus Strategy as resting on four pillars—protect, monitor, test and isolate. The University will provide the tools and guidance—examples include the student mask distribution event, which begins Monday, Aug. 31, and the Safe Return Plan itself—but all of us must also do our part to individually stop the spread of the novel coronavirus. Please find more detail about each of the pillars of the Safe Campus Strategy below our signatures.

    We are confident the measures outlined in the strategy will mitigate the spread of COVID-19. But each of must make the commitment through our behavior to help keep ourselves, our neighbors and our campus safe—all together, all of the time. In this challenging period, we have the strength and the resilience to thrive and prosper as a community. We can do this.

    Sincerely,

    Kara Wood
    Associate Vice President for Community Partnerships
    COVID-19 Response Coordination Team chair

    Gayle Ruggiero, M.D.
    Medical Director
    COVID-19 Response Coordination Team co-chair

    Lt. Andrew Bachmann
    WMU Department of Public Safety, Emergency Management
    COVID-19 Response Coordination Team co-chair
     


    Safe Campus Strategy Overview


    Here's an overview of those four foundational strategies, which are detailed on the Safe Return Plan website.

    Protect

    • Wear a mask: Masks are required in indoor spaces and outdoor spaces where physical distancing is not possible.
    • Practice vigilant hygiene: Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds or use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer.
    • Maintain physical distance: Stay at least 6 feet away from others while in public spaces.
    • Stay home if ill: If you are experiencing even the slightest COVID-19 symptoms, stay home and call Sindecuse Health Center at (269) 387-3287 for next steps.


    Monitor

    Take the daily health survey: Students, faculty and staff must complete a self-monitoring questionnaire each day before arriving on campus. Find this health survey at wmich.edu/survey. The survey is integrated into the Sindecuse patient portal, which includes every WMU community member. You can also access it through GoWMU.

    Here's how it works:

    • Login directly through wmich.edu/survey using your Bronco NetID and password—or access the survey through GoWMU.
    • You will answer a series of screening questions.
    • Once completed, you will receive a "badge" that can be visible on your mobile device. You may be asked to show your badge before entering a class or event. Sindecuse staff also use the badging system to admit employees and visitors to the health center.

    Badges:

    Green = Cleared. It's OK to visit campus on the date shown.
    Yellow = Survey is overdue.
    Orange = Quarantine. You answered "yes" to a screening question and should contact Sindecuse for further assessment, or you have been identified as a close contact through contact tracing.
    Red = Isolation. You have tested positive, are being monitored by the health center and may live on or off campus.

    This time-stamped badge is accessible from the main screen of the patient portal.

     

    Test

    • Rapid-result testing: No-cost, rapid-result antigen testing for COVID-19 is available to the WMU community at Sindecuse.
    • Pre-fall mass testing: Ahead of the semester, a five-day, free testing event began Thursday and runs through Monday, Aug. 31, at the Student Rec Center. Call (269) 387-3287 to make an appointment. Due to the volume of tests and social distancing, walk-ins will not be accepted. Learn more about the event here.
    • Always use Sindecuse for testing: Sindecuse offers an advantage in our fight against COVID-19 spread through dedicated, highly accurate testing, contact tracing and care exclusively for the WMU community. That means faster isolation of outbreaks. But we only get that protection if Sindecuse clinicians know about all the cases.


    Isolate

    • COVID-19 case communications: WMU will balance communicating information necessary to keep individuals and the community safe while also protecting privacy and abiding by federal law (HIPAA). All four strategies in this plan are designed to limit COVID-19 exposure. Case communication is one of many protections.
    • Chain of notifications: If an individual tests positive for COVID-19 through on-campus testing, Sindecuse will quickly notify the patient and will inform close contacts about their exposure to an infected individual. Those exposed must quarantine for 14 days. Sindecuse staff will also alert local and state health officials.
    • If the patient is a student: The student's name and isolation dates will be communicated to the dean of students and faculty. If the student gives consent, their diagnosis will also be shared with the dean of students and faculty. The director of housing will be notified if the student lives on campus. Sindecuse will direct Facilities Management to spaces that require special cleaning, if needed.
    • If the patient is an employee: The employee’s name, positive test result and isolation dates will be confidentially communicated to their supervisor. Sindecuse will direct Facilities Management on spaces and University vehicles that require special cleaning, if needed. Depending on the circumstances, colleagues who share a space with the employee may be notified that a co-worker tested positive. No other information will be shared.
  • Aug. 28, 2020, Penalties for violating COVID-19 safety rules in student code, including hosting prohibited parties

    Dear WMU students,

    Everyone on campus is eager to welcome you next week for the start of our fall semester. Our faculty and staff have been putting a lot of thought and effort into providing you with a great educational experience in a safe and healthy environment.

    Our Safe Return Plan details the myriad steps we have taken to try to keep everyone safe. Critical to our collective success is that we all behave responsibly. As Vice President for Student Affairs Diane Anderson announced earlier this week, we are updating the WMU Student Code of Conduct to reflect the need to demonstrate a shared responsibility in keeping everyone safe and healthy. The code’s changes (found in section 14, Harm to Persons) mean there are consequences —including suspension—for those who fail to comply with the Safe Return Plan, for those who host, organize or attend on- or off-campus gatherings that fall outside of the plan or otherwise show noncompliance with state-level executive orders or local health department policies.

    Additionally, on Monday, a Bronco Student Pledge goes live online. Under the pledge, you are agreeing to being an active participant in keeping our campus and local communities safe from the spread of COVID-19 by following health and safety protocols specified in the WMU Safe Return Plan and adhering to behavior expectations designed to foster the well-being of all members of the WMU community. When you log into GoWMU, you will need to affirm your commitment to the pledge. If you do not affirm, you will not be able to login.

    When we surveyed students this summer, not surprisingly, there was variability in opinion over what type of educational experience students wanted. Our faculty have also developed an array of online offerings to meet the needs of the 25% of you who want a fully distance schedule. However, three out of four students responded they either wanted a fully in-person educational experience or a hybrid experience with some in-person and some distance classes. The Safe Return Plan was developed to make that possible. While the plan includes social distancing and masking requirements for those coming to campus, 85% of students said they could adapt to the Safe Return Plan or were not concerned about it. Some (11%) even said that based on the plan, they were going to enroll for the fall when they previously had planned not to do so.

    We can have a successful return to campus, but to stay here, we need everyone to behave responsibly at all times, whether on or off campus and regardless of the situation. Don’t think that you can let your guard down for one day without consequences to yourself or others. Let’s learn from the experiences on some other campuses and avoid allowing one lapse by a few to negatively affect us all.

    Be prepared. Review the Student Code of Conduct, check your email regularly and visit the Safe Return Plan website for updates to processes and protocols. And, as always, if you have any health-related questions, please contact the Sindecuse Health Center.

    I look forward to a great fall semester. Be Smart. Be Safe. Be Broncos.

    Sincerely,

    Edward Montgomery
    President

  • Aug. 24, 2020, Back-to-School Briefing, testing event, the latest (employees)

    The countdown has begun: There are nine days to go before fall semester commences. To equip you for a smooth and safe transition to the 2020-21 academic year, below is a roundup of changes as well as reminders and other important information:

    Back-to-School Briefings
    Get detailed information about WMU’s Safe Campus Strategy, the health and safety portion of our Safe Return Plan, this Wednesday, Aug. 26. University officials who are overseeing testing, contact tracing, isolation and quarantine, cleaning processes, conduct and contingency planning will discuss the plan.

    Faculty and staff-focused content: 9 a.m. on Wednesday, Aug. 26
    Student and parent-focused content: 7 p.m. on Wednesday, Aug. 26


    Access both briefings from wmich.edu five minutes before the appointed time. The entire community is welcome at either or both briefings. They will also be recorded and posted. There is a great deal of information to share. Questions will not be taken. Inquiries can be directed to info@wmich.edu.

    Get Tested This Week
    WMU is holding a five-day COVID-19 testing event, Aug. 27 through 31, at the Student Recreation Center on Main Campus.

    To get tested:

    • As a benefits-eligible employee, you will not be charged out of pocket for the test. Temporary employees will be eligible for a no-cost test during this event only.
    • Make an appointment by calling Sindecuse Health Center at (269) 387-3287. Due to the volume of tests and social distancing, we will not be able to accept walk-ins.
    • Arrive a few minutes early for your scheduled time, and be sure to wear a mask.
    • Park in Lot 13, which is just east of the rec center across Ring Road South, and check in at the large roll-up door.

    Results are typically available within one hour, and these will be posted to your Sindecuse Health Center patient portal account. If you are positive, our staff will reach out to you regarding your positive result.

    Be Prepared, Read the Plan
    The University’s Safe Return Plan is formatted in an easy-to-skim website. Take a few minutes to review it this week to ensure you are prepared and don’t get surprised on the first day of classes.

    Note: This is the only presentation format of the Safe Return Plan. This approach allows the University to update information dynamically, increase accessibility and maximize communication with a web-based user experience.

    Here’s the latest:

    COVID-19 back-to-campus training video: WMU is offering access to a training program on COVID-19 safety for the return to campus. The Collaborative Institutional Training Initiative and the Association of American Medical Colleges have partnered to provide an overview of COVID-19, prevention strategies, recommended laboratory practices and points to consider as students, staff and faculty return to activities and operations. The course is available through Sept. 30.

    • Go to the CITI program website.
    • Click on the "register" button located in the blue login box to the right of the homepage.
    • Select Western Michigan University as your "organization affiliation" and follow the remaining registration steps.
     
    Accessing Waldo Library and University Libraries services: Waldo Library is starting a gradual reopening, beginning with the lobby and the first floor. While other parts of the library are closed, you can still access many services via an online chat or phone call.

    What to expect at the Bernhard Center: The Bernhard Center is enhancing many of its practices and procedures. Public spaces and meeting rooms will be cleaned more frequently, meeting room capacities reduced to accommodate for social distancing, furniture in dining and lounge areas has been spread out, hand sanitizer is available throughout the center, Bronco Express moved across the hall to the Global Lounge, which is much larger, and building hours have been reduced to accommodate extra cleaning (closing nightly at 10 p.m.). You can learn more by visiting the Bernhard Center website.

    Downloadable and self-adhesive COVID-19 signage available: WMU-specific signage with the University's safety messages is available in a variety of professionally printed, self-adhesive signs and floor decals. Messages include wearing a mask, social distancing, staying home when sick and overall COVID-19 reminders. An inventory of these signs and decals is available through Maintenance Stores in the Campus Services Building. University-branded signs may also be downloaded from the COVID-19 website.

    How to obtain an ID card and submit your photo: New this year, rather than University personnel taking photos for the Bronco Card, you may submit your own headshot. The Bronco Card is used for dining, residence halls, riding the bus, WMU events and more.

    Students and employees can start the process of getting their Bronco Card by submitting a photo online at https://photo.wmupd.wmich.edu. The site also provides details on the type of photos that will be permitted—think driver's license photo; selfies and filtered photos will not be accepted. After a photo has been submitted and approved, allow 24 hours for processing of the information you provided. Bronco Cards may be obtained at Parking Services after the photo has been submitted, accepted and approved. Parking Services, located at 2507 W. Michigan Ave., is open Monday through Thursday, 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m.; and Friday, 7:30 a.m. to 4 p.m.

    If a replacement card is needed, please contact the Bronco Card office at (269) 387-6278 or email dps-broncocard@wmich.edu. Obtaining a new Bronco Card may result in a replacement fee.


    For more information, continue to visit WMU's Safe Return Plan website, which will be continually updated with new information as it becomes available.

  • Aug. 24, 2020, Back-to-School Briefing, testing event, the latest (students and families)

    The countdown has begun: There are nine days to go before fall semester commences. To equip you for a smooth and safe transition to the 2020-21 academic year, below is a roundup of changes as well as reminders and other important information:

    Back-to-School Briefings
    Get detailed information about WMU’s Safe Campus Strategy, the health and safety portion of our Safe Return Plan, this Wednesday, Aug. 26. University officials who are overseeing testing, contact tracing, isolation and quarantine, cleaning processes, conduct and contingency planning will discuss the plan.

    Faculty and staff-focused content: 9 a.m. on Wednesday, Aug. 26
    Student and parent-focused content: 7 p.m. on Wednesday, Aug. 26


    Access both briefings from wmich.edu five minutes before the appointed time. The entire community is welcome at either or both briefings. They will also be recorded and posted. There is a great deal of information to share. Questions will not be taken. Inquiries can be directed to info@wmich.edu.

    Get Tested This Week
    WMU is holding a five-day COVID-19 testing event, Aug. 27 through 31, at the Student Recreation Center on Main Campus.

    To get tested:

    • As a benefits-eligible employee, you will not be charged out of pocket for the test. Temporary employees will be eligible for a no-cost test during this event only.
    • Make an appointment by calling Sindecuse Health Center at (269) 387-3287. Due to the volume of tests and social distancing, we will not be able to accept walk-ins.
    • Arrive a few minutes early for your scheduled time, and be sure to wear a mask.
    • Park in Lot 13, which is just east of the rec center across Ring Road South, and check in at the large roll-up door.

    Results are typically available within one hour, and these will be posted to your Sindecuse Health Center patient portal account. If you are positive, our staff will reach out to you regarding your positive result.

    Be Prepared, Read the Plan
    The University’s Safe Return Plan is formatted in an easy-to-skim website. Take a few minutes to review it this week to ensure you are prepared and don’t get surprised on the first day of classes.

    Note: This is the only presentation format of the Safe Return Plan. This approach allows the University to update information dynamically, increase accessibility and maximize communication with a web-based user experience.

    Here’s the latest:

    COVID-19 back-to-campus training video: WMU is offering access to a training program on COVID-19 safety for the return to campus. The Collaborative Institutional Training Initiative and the Association of American Medical Colleges have partnered to provide an overview of COVID-19, prevention strategies, recommended laboratory practices and points to consider as students, staff and faculty return to activities and operations. The course is available through Sept. 30.

    • Go to the CITI program website.
    • Click on the "register" button located in the blue login box to the right of the homepage.
    • Select Western Michigan University as your "organization affiliation" and follow the remaining registration steps.
    Accessing Waldo Library and University Libraries services: Waldo Library is starting a gradual reopening, beginning with the lobby and the first floor. While other parts of the library are closed, you can still access many services via an online chat or phone call.

    What to expect at the Bernhard Center: The Bernhard Center is enhancing many of its practices and procedures. Public spaces and meeting rooms will be cleaned more frequently, meeting room capacities reduced to accommodate for social distancing, furniture in dining and lounge areas has been spread out, hand sanitizer is available throughout the center, Bronco Express moved across the hall to the Global Lounge, which is much larger, and building hours have been reduced to accommodate extra cleaning (closing nightly at 10 p.m.). You can learn more by visiting the Bernhard Center website.

    Downloadable and self-adhesive COVID-19 signage available: WMU-specific signage with the University's safety messages is available in a variety of professionally printed, self-adhesive signs and floor decals. Messages include wearing a mask, social distancing, staying home when sick and overall COVID-19 reminders. An inventory of these signs and decals is available through Maintenance Stores in the Campus Services Building. University-branded signs may also be downloaded from the COVID-19 website.

    How to obtain an ID card and submit your photo: New this year, rather than University personnel taking photos for the Bronco Card, you may submit your own headshot. The Bronco Card is used for dining, residence halls, riding the bus, WMU events and more.

    Students and employees can start the process of getting their Bronco Card by submitting a photo online at https://photo.wmupd.wmich.edu. The site also provides details on the type of photos that will be permitted—think driver's license photo; selfies and filtered photos will not be accepted. After a photo has been submitted and approved, allow 24 hours for processing of the information you provided. Bronco Cards may be obtained at Parking Services after the photo has been submitted, accepted and approved. Parking Services, located at 2507 W. Michigan Ave., is open Monday through Thursday, 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m.; and Friday, 7:30 a.m. to 4 p.m.

    If a replacement card is needed, please contact the Bronco Card office at (269) 387-6278 or email dps-broncocard@wmich.edu. Obtaining a new Bronco Card may result in a replacement fee.


    For more information, continue to visit WMU's Safe Return Plan website, which will be continually updated with new information as it becomes available.

  • Aug. 21, 2020, Mass testing event set for Aug. 27-Sept. 1; make your appointment today

    Editor’s note: Message updated to reflect an extra day added to the multiple-day testing event. The final day is now Tuesday, Sept. 1.


    Dear campus community,

     

    We're thrilled to welcome you back to campus. WMU is a University in which you can thrive and prosper, and we always want the on-campus experience to be as safe and healthy as possible.

    A critical step toward a safe campus is to test as many of us as possible before we rejoin the campus community. We need your help: Get tested now. We are fortunate to have no-cost, rapid-result antigen testing for COVID-19. Results are typically available within one hour, and these will be posted to your portal account. If you are positive, our staff will reach out to you regarding your positive result.

    We’ve made this as easy as possible for you: Testing is at no cost, and we’re having a multiple-day testing event, Aug. 27 through Sept. 1, at the Student Recreation Center on Main Campus.

    To get tested:

    • As a student or benefits-eligible employee, you will not be charged out of pocket for the test. Temporary employees will be eligible for a no-cost test during this event only.
    • Make an appointment by calling (269) 387-3287. Due to the volume of tests and social distancing, we will not be able to accept walk-ins.
    • Arrive a few minutes early for your scheduled time, and be sure to wear a mask.
    • Park in Lot 13, which is just east of the rec center across Ring Road South, and check in at the large roll-up door.

    Many of us are a little anxious about the start of school. I want to reassure you that we can have a safe and productive year. As our University's medical director, I cannot overemphasize that testing is a crucial step to fighting the disease and staying safe. Get tested. Encourage your friends to do the same. We can do this. Here are other ways to keep us all safe:

    • Wear a mask: On campus, masks are required in indoor spaces and outdoor spaces where physical distancing is not possible.
    • Keep your hands clean: Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds or use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer.
    • Maintain physical distance: Stay 6 feet away from others while in public spaces.
    • Monitor symptoms and get tested: Even after getting tested next week, if you ever develop symptoms of COVID-19, no-cost testing will be available to all on campus.

    Your well-being is paramount at WMU. We put measures in place to safeguard your health and constantly evaluate ways to improve our safety practices. To that end, please continue to read your emails and visit the University's Safe Return Plan website.  You will learn about new developments, enhancements to our safety protocols and our expectations of you as a campus community member. Together, we will make this a great year.

     

    Be Smart. Be Safe. Be Broncos.

     

    Thank you,

    Gayle Ruggiero, M.D.

    Medical Director

    Sindecuse Health Center

  • Aug. 19, 2020, Fall plans for in-person instruction remain in place

    Dear campus community,

     

    Recently, some universities have made headlines by choosing to move their fall courses online, as Michigan State University did late yesterday. While MSU is maintaining in-person instruction for graduate students as well as for those in its health, law and veterinary colleges and for those in lab, studio and performance-based classes, their decision has led to questions about whether our plans have changed.

    Given that our focus is on the health and safety of our community, we have consistently made decisions based on practices recommended by health professionals, the data about conditions on our campus and in our area, and government regulations. We will continue to do so. As the pandemic is ever changing, we are prepared to, and will, adapt accordingly. Based on these factors, we are continuing to implement our Safe Return Plan.

    Each day we are reviewing data and remain in continuous communication with the Kalamazoo County Health & Community Services Department (KCHCS). Just yesterday, Health Officer Jim Rutherford, who is leading our community response to the pandemic, met with University academic leaders at a Provost's Council meeting.

    I’ve asked for Mr. Rutherford’s current assessment of our situation. He says:

     

    Throughout the COVID-19 pandemic response, the Kalamazoo County Health & Community Services Department has been carefully evaluating data and providing public health guidance based on current trends in our county, state and country. We are applying that same methodology as we consult with WMU on their reopening plans and support their plan to welcome Broncos to campus this fall.

    From a public health perspective, risk cannot be entirely eliminated. So, we focus on reducing risk and providing practical ways to keep risk low. Our guidance is based upon the implementation of risk mitigation measures, which WMU has emphasized in its plan. These measures have proven to minimize transmission of COVID-19. Our health department staff continues to monitor relevant data and case studies, and we will continue to guide WMU based on the data and research as we move through the school year.

    By diligently following the public health recommendations, not only while in school, but most importantly during social interactions outside of school, people are reducing their risk of contracting COVID-19. It takes all of us sharing the responsibility and adhering to all of the public health recommendations.

     

    In addition to the guidance of health officials, we consider state and local information, such as local trends in new cases, state trends in new cases relative to testing and local hospital ICU capacity, to name a few. Yesterday I reviewed relevant data with cabinet members who are advising me on our response. Here are a few data points that you might find helpful:

    • Since mid-June, Michigan’s test positivity rate has remained flat, while testing has steadily grown. Positivity rate is the percentage of all tests that are positive. Among its neighboring states, Michigan has the lowest positivity rate and the second-highest testing rate.
    • Kalamazoo County’s new-cases trend peaked in mid-July and has flattened with a slight downward trend since then.
    • The local number of hospitalizations is low with sufficient capacity for critical cases.

    We also have one of the most comprehensive plans in the state, with every department having a tailored return-to-work strategy. Many of our employees will continue to work from home some or all of the time, and faculty and staff will meet in a variety of in-person, distance education and hybrid formats. We also have available to us highly sophisticated, rapid testing that we’ve made barrier-free for students, faculty members and staff through Sindecuse Health Center. Testing is complemented by a thorough contact tracing program—capacity that most peer institutions do not have available on site.

    As we move forward, I will continue to monitor an array of data and continue to work closely with KCHCS. I am prepared to take actions necessary to manage spread, should it occur, while delivering our mission to the fullest extent our local situation allows. Our community can safely come back to campus if we remain vigilant and continue to follow the plans so many of us have worked hard to develop and that will promote safety in all settings. We will succeed if we work together; I invite you to join me.

     

    Sincerely,

    Ed Montgomery

    President

  • Aug. 10, 2020, Updates in return-to-campus planning and a cautionary experience

    Dear WMU students, faculty and staff,

    One week from today, our preparations for the return of students to campus will take the next step with the opening of several student-facing offices and return of additional residence hall staff. Shortly thereafter, on Sept. 2, we will be together again as a University community for the beginning of fall classes.

    In preparing for a safe in-person experience, the COVID-19 Response Coordination Team spent the summer planning with colleagues from across WMU to establish department-level protocols and practices that will guard against the exposure and spread of the novel coronavirus. I am grateful to everyone who has been involved in these efforts. They have done incredible work.

    In addition to these thoughtful strategies designed to safeguard our community, it's equally critical that our efforts to manage a public health crisis engage and enlist the public. All of us play a critical part in fostering a safe environment by adopting behaviors that mitigate spread.

    The news is filled with daily reports of outbreaks tied to events or gatherings where key behaviors—such as wearing a mask and physically distancing—were not observed consistently. Late last week, we learned that six members of the College of Aviation community tested positive for COVID-19, likely as the result of one such gathering. We hope their symptoms will be mild and their recovery speedy, but we also hope the lessons learned from this experience will be long lasting.

    While students, faculty and staff have adhered to health and safety protocols when at the aviation college, it appears that wasn't the case for one off-campus activity. As Aviation Dean Dave Powell wrote in his notification to the college, "The disease does not clock out when you leave campus."

    Many of those involved are now expressing regret. That is a positive sign, but this case suggests that each one of us also must make good choices—at all times. We can use this unfortunate moment to see that the virus is real, and while our precautions do work, we all have to do our part.

    As a campus, we will be continually monitoring and adapting as new information emerges, the thinking about best practices or the science develops, or the internal or external environment changes.

    You may have heard the Mid-American Conference announced over the weekend that fall sports will be postponed. While this is a loss for our student-athletes and our community, I wholeheartedly support this decision because it puts student-athlete safety and well-being first. In general, it is difficult to practice physical distancing or wear a mask while competing or practicing in sports. This is especially true in contact sports such as football and soccer. They simply do not allow for the safety measures we will employ in classrooms and labs, where physical distancing and masks will be universal precautions.

    It's clear that 2020-21 will be atypical in many ways, but we will traverse it successfully together. Throughout the year, we commit to communicating new or altered operational expectations. We ask you to stay informed by reading messages that come through your email and by frequently visiting the University's Safe Return Plan website, COVID-19 response website, as well as departmental websites.

    To that end, please find below a list of new developments that have recently been added to the plan. With these and other efforts implemented to date, we are planning for a healthy and productive academic year. We appreciate you for doing your part to keep yourself and campus well.

    Be Smart. Be Safe. Be Broncos.

    Thank you,

    Edward Montgomery
    President

    • The Safe Return site now offers guidance on using outdoor spaces and holding indoor and outdoor gatherings, in accordance with state directives, Kalamazoo County public health guidance and WMU's own health and safety plan. The guidelines detail the number of individuals permitted to gather in one location and under what circumstances.

    • Beginning with the fall semester for students, the WMU Parking Services permit system will go virtual, replacing physical parking tags and stickers. No more standing in lengthy lines to obtain a permit in person. Details are to come on a similar system for faculty and staff.

    • Textbooks, course materials, technology and gear are available to order online on the WMU Bookstore’s website. The bookstore also provides contact-free home delivery. Pickup will be available beginning Tuesday, Aug. 18, when the bookstore opens in the Bernhard Center. To accommodate physical distancing, a limited number of customers (about 50) will be allowed in the store at one time. Masks are required, and order pickup lines will reflect 6-foot distancing. Closer to the start of school, curbside pickup will be available in front of the building.

    • From antimicrobial solutions and misters to electrostatic disinfecting equipment and new UV light equipment, a number of state-of-the-art cleaning processes are being employed to mitigate spread of COVID-19 on campus. Read more about Custodial Services' innovations in cleaning and sanitation processes here.